Author Topic: Question about Pizza Sauces  (Read 3505 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline LeeB

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 38
  • I Love Pizza!
Question about Pizza Sauces
« on: January 06, 2005, 04:02:46 PM »
I hear everyone talk about 6-1 tomatos and different brands like that.  I understand some are better than others but I'm confused of really what I should be looking for.   The cans you buy at the store, are we looking for tomato sauce, tomato puree, crushed tomatos or what.    Kinda confused between the difference in a puree or sauce.  So what type should I be looking for ????


Offline Arthur

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 253
  • When Brooklyn Was the World
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2005, 04:28:34 PM »
Take a look at the ingredients:

http://www.redgold.com/products/redpack_sauce_puree.html

sauce and puree = water + tomato paste  <- who wants this much water on pizza :)
crushed and whole are mostly tomatoes <- you want this for pizza because it taste better.

Better to use whole and puree them in a food proc.

Start there.

Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2005, 09:03:18 PM »
Lee, what most of us use is 6-in-1 crushed tomatoes. Some like to use them right from the can.  I like to add Penzey's pizza spices when I make my sauce.
Shipping on 3 cans of crushed tomatoes is only 75 cents.

http://www.penzeys.com/

http://www.escalon.net/home.asp

Hope this helps
Randy

Offline LeeB

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 38
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2005, 08:39:45 AM »
Hmmmm, I may have to change my strategy.  I have been using the Margarhita or however you spell it recipe from the "American Pie" book and it seems pretty good.  However it has you put in quite a bit of water to the point that I have to simmer on a stove for quite a while to boil down the liquid.  We tried it straight as the recipe called for and when it was spooned on to the crust the water portion seemed to make a bee line for the edge of the crust and on to the baking stone which was not good.

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1983
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2005, 09:53:16 AM »
Heat = tomato's worst enemy.

When you heat a tomato it begins to lose its fresh taste. Most canned tomato products are made from paste and water (paste = tomatos that have been cooked down).

The 6-in-1 tomatoes that we're all raving about are different in that they use a low-heat method to can their product. Here is a snippet from their website:

"The Escalon facility is designed with proprietary technology that minimizes the 'heat' applied to the tomatoes during processing. By minimizing heat and residence (cooking) time, Escalon is able to capture more fresh, tomato color and flavor than other processors who design their factories to maximize throughput."

Click this link to read more about their process:
http://www.escalon.net/differences.asp

There are only two manufacturers that I am aware of that use similar processing techniques and therefore produce a superior tasting tomato product. Those two companies are Escalon (6-in-1) and Stanislaus.

As I've said before, I have tasted numerous canned tomato products side-by-side, raw, straight out of the can. The 6-in-1 tomatoes, by far, have the freshest tomato flavor.

When making a pizza sauce, you sould try not to pre-cook (or simmer) the sauce before applying it to the pizza. Remember, cooking removes the fresh taste. You should apply the sauce in a raw, uncooked, state and let it cook in the oven on the pizza. You might have to blend two types of tomato products together in order to have a thick, non-watery, raw sauce. I usually mix 6-in-1 tomatoes with Escalon's Bonta sauce (Bonta is similar to tomato paste, yet Escalon's processing technique retains much of the fresh flavor of the tomato.)


Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1983
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2005, 09:58:40 AM »
Also, I've found that it's best to keep a pizza sauce simple.

Here's my favorite NY style sauce:

6-in-1 crushed tomatoes mixed with Bonta tomato sauce, oregano flakes, fresh garlic, salt, and pepper.

That's it. You don't need a lot of herbs and spices because the tomato sauce blends with the crust, cheese, and toppings when you eat it.
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.

Offline LeeB

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 38
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2005, 11:43:05 AM »
Wow, excellent feedback.  I'm definitely going to be scrambling tonight to find a differnent way to make the sauce.  Again, what I have been making is very good, but I'm, getting the feeling that it can be much better.  Thanks

Offline JRD

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6
  • Location: Chicago, Illinois
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2005, 01:28:50 PM »
I used RedGold's crushed tomatos on my last pizza. Previously, I had been using Hunt's tomato paste, watered down. The crushed tomatos were several orders of magnitude better in taste...I highly recommend them. At some point, I'll order some 3 in 1 from Escalon, but the RedGold brand is availalbe in my local supermarket for a good price.

I usually mix the tomatos with some spices--oregano, basil, garlic, and red pepper flakes--and let it all sit in the refrigerator for an hour or two to let the flavors blend. Simple, and tasty.

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2005, 02:30:22 PM »
My Chicago style is simple, 6-in-1 out of the can, topped with basil.

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline LeeB

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 38
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2005, 03:57:05 PM »
Ok, it's almost "Showtime". I made the dough last night when I got home from work and it is out of the fridge now warming up.  Will roll it out later when the wife & kids get home from bowling.

As far as the sauce, I'm using Contadina crushed tomatos and added the spices they said to use in the  "American Pie" book, with the exception I added 1/8 tsb. of marjoram & thyme.  Also I didn't heat it, just straight out of the can and then through it in the fridge early this morning.

As far as the cooking temp. I'm going to try 475 deg. for 10 minutes and then check.  Also I have a stone on the middle rack and the pie will go on the other one that is on the lower rack.  Whoo- Hooo!

Thanks again for everyones input.  ;D


Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re: Question about Pizza Sauces
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2005, 04:48:50 PM »
Lee don't use thr preshreaded cheeses like kraft.  Use Poly-O part skim and shreaded it yourself.  Not sure which recipe you are using so I can't say about the oven setting.

Happy pizza.
Randy