Author Topic: Ciabatta Pizza  (Read 9367 times)

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Offline briterian

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Ciabatta Pizza
« on: October 13, 2008, 09:26:56 PM »
Anyone every try this recipe for Ciabatta Pizza. It looks interesting mainly from the perspective of how hydrated and how well mixed the dough is.  I bet the gluten creation is massive here and it might be what I'm looking for to get the chew and blistering.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3621/quick-rustic-ciabatta-pizza-recipe-full-howto-pics


Offline sheffield

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2008, 10:04:24 PM »
I've made this bread.  It's pretty good.  Will make a good pizza!

Offline BurntEdges

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2009, 02:33:26 PM »
Briterian,

Yes, I have.  My results & photos are here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8539.0.html

Offline andreguidon

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2009, 08:35:51 PM »
I made the same recipe, and it turns out PERFECT !!

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7779.0.html
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." Leonardo da Vinci

Infoodel

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2009, 10:55:31 PM »
The intensive mix is absolutely unnecessary for making high hydration dough - even at 95%. The dough oxidation from intensive mixing does help gluten formation but (according to Calvel et al) excessive oxidation can also have a negative impact on flavour.
Careful mixing procedure (don't add the salt initially) followed by periodic stretch-and-fold is a much gentler but very effective way of developing the strength.
I formulated a similar recipe for making Pizza Bianca a few weeks ago. Originally it started out as a sourdough recipe but I adapted it for IDY.
Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/foolishpoolish/sets/72157622081301770/
Recipe: http://seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/08/how-to-make-pizza-bianca-at-home-recipe.html


Enjoy!,
Foolish Poolish

note: Another effective technique is double hydration (I might use this if I were incorporating a significant portion of preferment) - but that's another recipe entirely.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2009, 10:58:34 PM by Infoodel »

Offline Matthew

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2009, 08:30:40 AM »
The intensive mix is absolutely unnecessary for making high hydration dough - even at 95%. The dough oxidation from intensive mixing does help gluten formation but (according to Calvel et al) excessive oxidation can also have a negative impact on flavour.
Careful mixing procedure (don't add the salt initially) followed by periodic stretch-and-fold is a much gentler but very effective way of developing the strength.
I formulated a similar recipe for making Pizza Bianca a few weeks ago. Originally it started out as a sourdough recipe but I adapted it for IDY.
Pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/foolishpoolish/sets/72157622081301770/
Recipe: http://seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/08/how-to-make-pizza-bianca-at-home-recipe.html


Enjoy!,
Foolish Poolish

Could you kindly provide the sourdough recipe.  I would like to try it in the Wood Fired Oven using a sourdough starter.

Thanks,
Matt

note: Another effective technique is double hydration (I might use this if I were incorporating a significant portion of preferment) - but that's another recipe entirely.


Infoodel

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2009, 04:28:40 PM »
Hi Matt
I lost my notes on the sourdough recipe (it was in July while I was still in TN) but essentially it's the same recipe as the IDY version but using about 10% (wrt flour) 100% hydration starter - fermentation time was 10-12 hours.
I never got what I thought was a totally satisfactory result with the sourdough because the additional acidity tended to yield an overly chewy result. With that in mind, I'd suggest the following:

100% flour
83-88% water (depending on the flour - although I'd recommend KA Bread or even All Trumps for this one)
5% olive oil
2.5% salt
10% sourdough starter (100% hydration)

If you're using a high gluten flour, you could just mix all the ingredients in one go and then stretch and fold periodically over the next 12 hours, otherwise you might want to add the oil and salt after an initial 30 minute resting period.  I included the oil because of the aforementioned 'chew' factor but I've only actually tried adding oil to an IDY version...you can omit it and take the hydration up to 90-95% if you prefer.
Sorry I can't be more exact about percentages etc. Never really nailed the sourdough version to my complete satisfaction. I look forward to hearing about your efforts.

Cheers,

FP


« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 04:30:53 PM by Infoodel »

Offline Matthew

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2009, 05:41:33 PM »
Hi Matt
I lost my notes on the sourdough recipe (it was in July while I was still in TN) but essentially it's the same recipe as the IDY version but using about 10% (wrt flour) 100% hydration starter - fermentation time was 10-12 hours.
I never got what I thought was a totally satisfactory result with the sourdough because the additional acidity tended to yield an overly chewy result. With that in mind, I'd suggest the following:

100% flour
83-88% water (depending on the flour - although I'd recommend KA Bread or even All Trumps for this one)
5% olive oil
2.5% salt
10% sourdough starter (100% hydration)

If you're using a high gluten flour, you could just mix all the ingredients in one go and then stretch and fold periodically over the next 12 hours, otherwise you might want to add the oil and salt after an initial 30 minute resting period.  I included the oil because of the aforementioned 'chew' factor but I've only actually tried adding oil to an IDY version...you can omit it and take the hydration up to 90-95% if you prefer.
Sorry I can't be more exact about percentages etc. Never really nailed the sourdough version to my complete satisfaction. I look forward to hearing about your efforts.

Cheers,

FP




Thanks for the info.  I'll give it a shot & post the results.  I am thinking of omitting the oil, increasing the hydration to 90% & using 15% starter (total dough weight). I'm going to let it ferment for 24 hours & then start to stretch & fold.
Matt

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2011, 08:09:55 PM »
I know it is an old post,  but I made the ciabatta with a starter, so I am replying here.  I used 50% ground winter red wheat and 50% winter white wheat,  water 85%,  2.5% salt, and 15% starter ( 100% hydration wheat starter) , with a little extra yeast thrown in. ( this was a test pie of 150 grams flour, so the yeast was around 1/16 tsp.)  I mixed it and let is rise at room temperature ( 68 F ) for around 6 to 7 hours, then balled, and let rise another hour or two.  It was very thin, paper thin in part, and very wet .  It tasted very good,  though it was so thin, it developed a hole when I loaded it onto the stone and some of it stuck to the stone when I tried to get it out.  I will be trying it again and dropping the hydration a little -     


 

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