Author Topic: Confused over Countertops  (Read 3180 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Kemosa

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 75
Confused over Countertops
« on: October 21, 2008, 06:46:27 PM »
I am looking for some advice with respect to countertop ovens.   Some of these ovens state "Not recommended for fresh dough".  Can anyone who has one of these ovens please comment.  Is this the case for most of these type of ovens?  Guess I don't understand why if the oven reaches 650 degrees, has a stone, and is seemingly well insulated.  I make NY Style.  Thin crust.

The other questions relates to the electrical information & suitability.  I plan on using the oven outdoors protected by a BBQ island kitchen (below a granite countertop).  First of all, is this safe?  or is the oven going to require a fair amount of clearance and really good ventilation?

Lastly, I know that with home use I need to have a phase I setup, but what voltage and watt power should I be looking for? Probably use it for parties, making thin crust pies.  Will make anywhere from 5 to 20 pies.  Does the power relate to recovery time?

I am looking at two ovens, the Bakers-Pride P-22S and the Cecilware P-20.  Would these ovens work for me or any suggestions?
Thanks.


Offline enchant

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 307
  • Age: 62
  • Location: Marshfield, MA
  • World-class pizza maker in the making
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2008, 09:17:42 AM »
The "not recommended for fresh dough" part puzzles me, too.

I have a couple of well-used Bakers Pride 18" countertop ovens, and I use nothing but fresh dough.  Screw the warnings.  I tear the warning tags off my mattress, too.

Although the temperature comes up to 650 on my ovens cooks a great thin-crust NY pizza in about 6 minutes, it doesn't retain that temperature.  I find that the stone temp will drop to about 500 and will require a good ten minutes of recovery time to get back up to about 600.

The voltage should be indicated on the oven itself.  You can probably tell just by looking at the plug.
--pat--

Offline Frankie G

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 176
  • Location: Northern California
  • Wood-Fired ovens RULE!
    • Frankie G's Pizza Oven Project
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2008, 10:42:31 AM »
Sometimes... pizza ovens can be "glorified Toaster Ovens"  This could be the reason for the "not-for-fresh dough" remark.

But I have an older Bakers pride, double deck oven that runs on 110.  and fits two 14" pizzas.... gets up to 750 degrees... works great.

One must consider what they'll use it for... size (both horizontally and vertically) and mobility (will you be using it for travel like fairs and food shows...?  if so these ovens get hot... and take a while to cool down.)

Just some thoughts.


Frankie G


Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3073
  • Age: 43
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2008, 05:04:35 PM »
Frankie, have you measured the stone temp at 750?  If so, do the pizzas brown evenly top and bottom at this temp?

Offline Kemosa

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 75
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2008, 09:29:02 AM »
Thanks for the replies.  Think I have found the oven.  Bakers Pride P-22S BL.  According to their website, this oven heats to 680, has 2 large decks (can make my 20" pie!), and the BL stands for "Brick-Lined" which aids with heat recovery times and better top heat coverage. 

Still not sure what to expect the as far as electrical set up.  I guess I could email the company, but just wondering if anyone here is familiar with the power aspect.  This oven is Phase 1, 208V (??).  Is this going to require an electrician?  Don't really understand the electrical part of this.  Thinking it will have one of those 3 prong power cords??  Can anyone comment? 

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2008, 01:39:27 PM »
Thanks for the replies.  Think I have found the oven.  Bakers Pride P-22S BL.  According to their website, this oven heats to 680, has 2 large decks (can make my 20" pie!), and the BL stands for "Brick-Lined" which aids with heat recovery times and better top heat coverage. 

Still not sure what to expect the as far as electrical set up.  I guess I could email the company, but just wondering if anyone here is familiar with the power aspect.  This oven is Phase 1, 208V (??).  Is this going to require an electrician?  Don't really understand the electrical part of this.  Thinking it will have one of those 3 prong power cords??  Can anyone comment? 
I am not an electrician! However I am pretty sure that 208V service is usually available in commercial settings, not a home use. 220 outlet can be obtained by using 2 standard breaker panel slots joined together (2 hot leads from the panel). You can look at your panel now and see if it has two breaker handles that are connected, that would normally be a 220.

Best to consult a real electrician, although I have yet to burn down my house! LOL

PNW

Offline pcampbell

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 767
  • Age: 34
  • Location: VT & NJ
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2008, 01:54:32 PM »
This is right 208 is 3 phase, 240 is 2 phase.  Also keep looking at the bakers pride website - there is one that allows you to individually control the temperature of the bottom and top decks - it may be the one you're looking at.  Usually you can order these in either  2 or 3 - just make sure it's 2 and yes you will need a special outlet.
Patrick

Offline goosen1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 211
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Originally from Joliet IL.. Now in Buffalo Mo.
  • What can Brown do for you??
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2008, 02:37:31 PM »
Just about all residential homes have 220v single phase electric service. To have a 208v 3 phase you would need an expensive phase converter. The cost can be anywhere from $500-$1000 for the converter. Also, That is not the cost for the labor to hook it up.

Now if you want more power... You can always have the electric company come out and hook up to around 10,000v - 20,000v if needed... But I think that would be just a tad tooooo much!!!  LOL!!!!

Anyways.. You should always have have a licensed electrician do this type of work. 3 phase is not for the DIY weekend warrior.
 
Goose
Arguing with a truckdriver is like wrestling with a pig in the mud.. After a while.... you realize the pig enjoys it!!!!

Offline Kemosa

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 75
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2008, 02:49:52 PM »
The oven is definitely available in single phase, but the voltage is 208.  Wasn't sure if I needed anything special to supply power to it safely.  I'll call an electrician, they'll know instantly what I have  do...if anything. 

Offline ctimmer

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 39
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Big Lake, Alaska
  • Just let me have one more pizza and then I'll quit
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2008, 11:51:39 PM »
I worked for Pizza Hut when they were using a standard Blodgett oven with a slate floor. The ovens were converted to a steel floor. This was before deep dish and all of the pizza's were cooked in cutter pans. This was also when the company still cared about quality - no more.

The slate floor was more suited to a lower volume operation where the oven door was closed most of the time. If the oven door was open for more than 15 seconds the slate floor acted like an insulator, slowing down the heat recovery process.

The steel floor transmitted the heat almost instantly. If you were working the pie's for more than 10-15 seconds your arm started to cook. Once the oven door was closed temperature recovery was very quick.

Under ideal conditions , I think the slate floor delivered slightly better results. The steel floor was a better overall compromise.

Curt


Offline Frankie G

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 176
  • Location: Northern California
  • Wood-Fired ovens RULE!
    • Frankie G's Pizza Oven Project
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2008, 09:08:57 AM »
Frankie, have you measured the stone temp at 750?  If so, do the pizzas brown evenly top and bottom at this temp?

Hey Scott r, no I have not measured the temp... I haven't used this oven in a few years... and I usually fired it up to about 500 and it worked great.  although one still needed to spin the pie half way through. 

I this was my pizza oven before the brick beast in the back yard.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2008, 11:53:51 AM »
Hey Scott r, no I have not measured the temp... I haven't used this oven in a few years... and I usually fired it up to about 500 and it worked great.  although one still needed to spin the pie half way through. 

I this was my pizza oven before the brick beast in the back yard.
What model is that oven? I have not seen any of those newer counter top ovens that will get over 700.

Thanks

PNW

ps -want to sell it?

Offline Frankie G

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 176
  • Location: Northern California
  • Wood-Fired ovens RULE!
    • Frankie G's Pizza Oven Project
Re: Confused over Countertops
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2008, 11:31:33 PM »
just sold it. Sorry..... :(

And while I know that the dial goes to 700 degrees.... I have not measured the temp for accuracy...




 

pizzapan