Author Topic: Cracker crust I can make and use now  (Read 2150 times)

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Offline lj

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Cracker crust I can make and use now
« on: November 20, 2008, 10:11:43 AM »
Do you guys know a good cracker crust recipie I can use to make
now and use in a few hours.
  Thanks


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cracker crust I can make and use now
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2008, 12:04:08 PM »
lj,

One of the few recipes I have seen on the forum for a cracker style pizza that can be made and used fairly quickly is the one described in a series of posts starting at Reply 3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1311.msg17388.html#msg17388. While that recipe does not call for any yeast, I believe that you should be able to add some yeast (I would use IDY and a fair amount of it) for flavor purposes more so than for fermentation purposes. I would also use water that is quite warm, about 120-130 degrees F. Also, if you have a source of heat to warm up the dough (to about 110-120 degrees F) before rolling it out, I think you will find it much easier to roll out. Otherwise, it may take a fairly long time, multiple rest periods, and a lot of brute force to roll out the dough.

If you don't have high gluten flour, you should be able to use bread flour without changing the recipe. The Better for Bread flour or the Harvest King bread flour from General Mills would be a good choice. All-purpose flour may also be possible but you would have to reduce the amount of water (because of the lower absorption value for all-purpose flour) and you will not get a lot of crust color. You should also be able to use a pizza stone if you don't have a cutter pan. With a stone, you will have to adjust the size of the rolled-out skin to the size of your stone.

If you decide to proceed, please let us know what results you get.

Peter

Offline JConk007

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Re: Cracker crust I can make and use now
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2008, 09:16:02 PM »
Peter,
Hello again I am going thru the cracker crust recipes in the recipes section. The cracker style and the thin crispy cracker style seem to have the same picture? I see both call for overnight minimum rise to develop. Does one call for docking and The cracker and crispy not? Is your experience you should use the cutter pan? I think I have only 1- 12" or can I get a good result directly on my  Wolfe oven brick? Not the outdoor, oven I am closing that down soon.  :(  Why the food processor on the first and KA on second? Also why reg. olive oil and not extra virgin? Just curious. This crust will be my next effort indoors. We have Pizza joint here  in Mahwah NJ called Kinchleys Tavern if you do some looking that is what I am after and I would love to clone that. Its great stuff but I think just think it may be pre made shells they pump out so many so fast! and the place is packed beyond belief allways. They have not put a dime into it since who knows when and the taste is great. beside that its Cash only! serious margins here.
Thanks
John
« Last Edit: November 20, 2008, 09:49:44 PM by JConk007 »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cracker crust I can make and use now
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2008, 10:01:20 PM »
John,

Can you refer me to some posts where a cracker style and a thin crispy cracker style seem to have the same picture? Often the main difference is the thickness of the crust, which can yield a "saltine" or tender cracker type of crust in one instance but a thin and crispy, flaky (brittle) crust in another instance. From a photography standpoint the two can look pretty much the same, especially if dressed in the same way.

There are a lot of variations in cracker style doughs. The doughs can be made using either a food processor or a KitchenAid or similar type of mixer, although I believe that the food processor does a better and quicker job. The doughs can be fermented at room temperature--for only a few hours and even overnight--and they can be fermented in the refrigerator. It is also possible to do a combination of both methods of fermentation. If the doughs are to be cold fermented, they can be shaped into skins either before or after refrigeration. It is also common to dock the skins, whether for a cracker style or a thin and crispy and flaky crust. The skins can be pre-baked or not. I personally prefer to use a nonperforated dark anodized cutter pan but it is also possible to bake the pizzas directly on a pizza stone. The oil can be just about anything. From what I can tell, professionals tend to use ordinary vegetable oil (usually soybean), because it is cheap, but it is also possible to use olive oil or an olive oil/canola or similar blend. I generally don't use the extra virgin olive oil, but if you like the taste, then you should use it. Professionals tend not to use extra virgin olive oil because it is too expensive and the taste may be a little too potent. I am hard pressed to recall reading about extra virgin olive oil being used by professionals for this style of pizza.

Many of the chains that sell cracker style or thin and crispy pizzas use par-baked crusts (often called shells) that are prepared offsite and delivered to the stores where they can be frozen or refrigerated until ready to be used. There are also companies that specialize in par-baked crusts for use by pizza operators. There are pizza operators, however, who make their own skins for the cracker style. They use dough rollers/sheeters and stamp out skins, which may or may not be docked before using.

If you want to get more detail on dough preparation and management techniques for the cracker style, you may want to take a look at this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.0.html.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 20, 2008, 10:06:37 PM by Pete-zza »


 

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