Author Topic: A formula for increasing flour gluten  (Read 3643 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Matthew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2228
A formula for increasing flour gluten
« on: December 18, 2008, 09:02:11 AM »
Hi there,

I have read alot about high gluten flour when making pizza, the general consensus is that it really doesn't make that much of a difference.  I thought that I would experiment a little bit & draw my on conclusions.  That being said I tried to devise a formula for increasing the gluten/protein level in my flour from 12.5% to 14%.

I live in Toronto, Ontario Canada & use a western hard wheat white unbleached flour with a protein/gluten content of about 12.5% that I purchase from a local mill that services the bakery industry.  A friend of mine owns an artisan bread company & swears by it so I thought that I would give it a shot for pizza.
I also purchased a high gluten flour with a content of about 80%.

Now, as we all know too much gluten can be toxic so I want to ensure the proper amount is being added.

I spoke to a food chemist at the mill & she gave me this really complicated formula.  She also mentioned that a real simple formula is 1-1.5 tbs of high gluten flour (80%)  for 3 cups of flour.  I prefer to us a measurement in weight as oppose to volume.

She was speaking quite fast & had a heavy accent so this is what I pieced together on her formula.

Based on 100 gms:

.14  (end result; % of gluten to be achieved, 14%) * 100 grams=.125 (% of gluten in flour 12.5%) + .80x (the gluten content of high gluten flour 80%)

Does this make sense????  ???

I wasn't sure if the above formula was correct so I made up my own formula & came up with the following;

100 grams of flour = 12.5 grams of gluten
100 grams of high gluten flour = 80 grams of gluten

Therefore by replacing 2 grams of regular flour with high gluten flour, the following end result will be achieved:

12.5 - .25 (.125*2) + 1.6 (.8*2)=13.85 or 13.85%  ;D

The only problem is that I don't know how accurate my digital scale is when dealing with such a low value as 2 oz's.  Maybe time for a new scale.  Anyone have any recommendations on a highly accurate scale?











Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: A formula for increasing flour gluten
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2008, 11:00:10 AM »
Matthew,

There is already a formula on this forum for calculating the amount of vital wheat gluten (VWG; what you are calling high gluten flour with 80% protein) it takes to increase the overall protein percentage of another flour.  You can find the formula here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4252.msg35773.html#msg35773

and you can find the Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator to do the math for you here:

http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/

If you click on the summation symbol (Greek Sigma letter) you will also see the formula for calculating the reverse: what the total protein percentage is of two flours of known quantities combined.  I attached both formulas here for convenience.

- red.november
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 08:15:25 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Matthew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2228
Re: A formula for increasing flour gluten
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2008, 01:51:45 PM »
red.november,

Thanks so much, really helps alot.  I double checked against my calculations & worked out to be the exact same.

Matt

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: A formula for increasing flour gluten
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2008, 02:58:54 PM »
Thanks so much, really helps alot.  I double checked against my calculations & worked out to be the exact same.

You're welcome.  Although I thought you would have been more interested in the first formula (the one used to determine how much VWG to use) rather than the second formula.  I didn't know you had any calculations to compare against for the first formula.