Author Topic: crust  (Read 2465 times)

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mrmonte

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crust
« on: January 15, 2005, 07:46:33 PM »
what have i done wrong ? I made the dough according to the instructions, let it set in the refridgerator over night, then set it out on the counter for 5 hours, roled it out , poked holes in dough, placed it on pizza stone that had been in 500 degree oven for 1/2 hour, topped it with sauce and toppings, but the crust , while thin, came out HARD and Cripsy, an not airy and light.


Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
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Re: crust
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2005, 08:51:09 PM »
Which recipe? What type of pizza?  ???
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jimmy

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Re: crust
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2005, 11:43:06 AM »
it was the thin crust pizza  recipe from  here at pizzamaking.com. I'm not sure what im doing wrong, but i cant get a decent thin crust thats light and airy

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
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Re: crust
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2005, 11:45:24 AM »
Check out the two new "DKM Thin Crust" topics that I just created. They should answer your questions.
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Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
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Re: crust
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2005, 11:53:48 AM »
I just re-read your post and noticed your use of the words "airy and light"

I think you may be somewhat confused by the wording on this website.

There are two meanings for the word "thin crust pizza."

The first is your typical "New York" style, which has a light and airy, or puffy, edge which tapers down to a thin and crisp center. This type of pizza is usually folded to keep the point from drooping downwards.  NY Style pizza is made by hand-tossing and stretching the dough.

The other type is a "Thin and Crispy" or "Crackery" type crust. This pizza is characterized as having a uniformly thin and crackery crust from edge to center. The crust has a lot of "toothiness" to it, and it's made by rolling out the dough with a rolling pin or a dough sheeter. It is then docked (pricked with holes), and cooked in a pan.

It sounds to me like you're looking for a NY style pizza recipe and not a thin and crackery pizza. You might want to try the NY style recipe on this site if that's the case.  :)
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Offline canadave

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Re: crust
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2005, 12:00:09 PM »
Yes, Steve is exactly right...."thin crust" and "light and airy" are not words that should be used in the same sentence ;)

Dave

jimmy

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Re: crust
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2005, 05:19:54 PM »
Thanks you Steve, actually Im new at this and the crust im shooting for will be the thin and crackery type. I'm purchasing a 16 " cutter pan and as son as it gets here i will give the recipe a try. thanks again for the info, pics. etc. been a great help,especially the pics, they really explain a lot.

jimmy

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Re: crust
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2005, 12:46:19 AM »
help !  I made up a batch of dough according to the thin and crackery crust recipe from Steve. I have a digital scale and i measured all ingrediants exactly. I started the dough at 1:00 p.m. and its 10:00 p.m. now. The hasnt "risen" at all, should it have by now ? Should I give it the full 24 hours and try and roll it out and try and make a pizza ? I will mention that  I did NOt have a high gluten flour.

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
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Re: crust
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2005, 08:20:53 AM »
It won't rise much.
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jimmy

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Re: crust
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2005, 11:22:01 AM »
Thanks for the info again Steve, I had one more question. When making the dough, why do we add the yeast directly to the flour rather than adding it to warm water and letting it activate for several minutes ? Thank you for your comments.


Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
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Re: crust
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2005, 11:49:22 AM »
I use instant yeast (IDY) which does not need to be hydrated before use. If you use active dry yeast (ADY), then you should add it to the water first.
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