Author Topic: More Charring, Less Browning  (Read 1644 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
More Charring, Less Browning
« on: December 25, 2008, 12:40:06 PM »
I use a high-temp oven (700-800) and I noticed different results in terms of charring and crust color. Sometimes the pies come more charred and whiter in color and some other time they are just a little less charred but more bread-brown colored. These results occur even within pies from the same dough.

How can I control that? Is it purely a temperature-related issue or it also has to do with hydration % and flour type?


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21873
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2008, 01:29:32 PM »
Saad,

All of the things you mentioned are factors but it is hard to generalize from them to specific situations. It is easier to address specific examples. For example, are you using sugar in the dough and, if so, how much and what is the fermentation protocol (e.g., room temperature or cold fermentation) and fermentation time?  Then, what kind of flour are you using? The hydration may be a factor (because of its effect on the rate of fermentation) but it is not quite as important as the residual sugar in the dough at the time of baking, the protein content of the flour, and the general baking protocol.

Peter

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2008, 01:57:46 PM »
Pete,

Thanks for replying.

My dough is as follows:

50:50 (GM bread+GM AP)
Water: 66.67%
Salt: 1.66%
ADY: 0.54%

I use a 72 hours cold fermentation and I let the dough for 2 hours at room temperature before baking.

Saad

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2008, 02:00:37 PM »
Ok I lied  ;D

Sometimes I rush and use the dough after 48 hours of cold fermentation but never before. As for the pre-bake time, it's 1:30 to 2:30 hours depending on how much the dough has risen.

But my previous post is more generalized and is the actual case 85% of the times.

Saad

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21873
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2008, 03:56:16 PM »
Saad,

Since you are not adding sugar to the dough, and assuming that the flour or flour blend is a constant, then the varying crust coloration is most likely because of varying levels of residual sugar in the dough at the time of baking. After about two days of cold fermentation, the residual sugar levels will be lower (because of consumption by the yeast), manifesting itself by a lighter colored finished crust.

Peter

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2008, 02:20:43 AM »
Actually my goal is to make it lighter in color than it is right now. I guess leaving it ferment longer wouldn't make much of a difference as I go up to 72 hours sometimes. Do I have other options?

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2008, 03:49:41 AM »
Question for you....

I don't know if I understood your initial post correctly but it sounds like you want a light-colored crust with some leoparding on it, correct? Like the pizze in Naples, right?

You might want to try a combo of 75% Caputo Pizzeria and 25% AP or Bread flour and combine that with a longer fermentation time. At least that's what I would start out with and adjust those two variables accordingly, one dough at a time.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
Re: More Charring, Less Browning
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2008, 04:11:55 AM »
Essen,

Thanks for using the term "leoparding" as it is the best way to describe what I have in mind. My current crust gets a nice "leoparding" but the rest of it is definitely not light-colored. I really want more contrast if I should say.

Can you please let me know the reason behind your suggestion? I would like to get a better understanding so I can better adjust my end results.

Saad


 

pizzapan