Author Topic: anyone ever make bread from Lehmann's dough recipe?  (Read 1221 times)

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Offline fizzala

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anyone ever make bread from Lehmann's dough recipe?
« on: January 10, 2009, 04:45:35 PM »
I can't find a post regarding this but surely someone has done this.  Any idea of how I might make a loaf of bread from his recipe?  Rising times, baking temp and time in oven?
I've made many an Italian bread but nothing comes close to a local Italian market. Their bread is reminiscent of a good Pizza crust, nice and crusty and sort of tough on the outside and lots of big holes inside.
I made the recipe posted by Pete-zza that called for 202 g of flour and I doubled that then split it into 2.  My intention was to make Pizza of course but I have to wonder if this would be good for a nice artesian type of bread also. I made it yesterday in my new Kitchen Aid Mixer and I have to say it was the best looking dough ball I think I've ever seen! Don't know if it was the mixer or the dough recipe of both but I can't wait to see how it comes out.


Online Pete-zza

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Re: anyone ever make bread from Lehmann's dough recipe?
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2009, 05:06:04 PM »
fizzala,

I have a brother who once told me that he made bread rolls out of a Lehmann NY style dough recipe that I gave him, with very good results, but I don't recall anyone reporting on the forum that they made a bread loaf out of the dough. The basic Lehmann NY style dough recipe is intended to be used mainly to produce a low-yeast dough that is to be cold fermented for about 1-3 days before using. So, the yeast level may be lower than what one might normally use to make bread dough. Also, the dough for bread purposes would be kneaded more in order to get full development of the the gluten, mainly by mechanical means, whereas for pizza dough the preferred method is to slightly underknead the dough and rely on biochemical gluten development to complete the job. The Lehmann dough may also be a bit low on hydration. The salt level is fine, however. If desired, using autolyse would be a good idea if the dough is to be used to make bread. This would improve the hydration of the flour, reduce oxidation and overall makeup time, and yield a nice cream colored crumb with good texture and improved flavor.

Peter

Offline fizzala

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Re: anyone ever make bread from Lehmann's dough recipe?
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2009, 09:10:38 PM »
Thanks for your reply, that makes perfect sense. Maybe one day I'll try rolls and see how they do.