Author Topic: doubling a recipe  (Read 936 times)

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Offline Chet

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doubling a recipe
« on: November 28, 2010, 09:03:07 AM »

 This is an emergency recipe I use on occasions. If I wanted to double it it, would using twice the ingredients work out,

1 cup warm water
1 package ADY
2 1/2 to 2 3/4 cup AP flour
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 tbl olive oil

    thanks
       Chet


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: doubling a recipe
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2010, 10:38:12 AM »
This is an emergency recipe I use on occasions. If I wanted to double it it, would using twice the ingredients work out,

1 cup warm water
1 package ADY
2 1/2 to 2 3/4 cup AP flour
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 tbl olive oil

    thanks
       Chet

Chet,

I would say yes. On very rare occasions I have seen recipes scaled differently but the quantities of ingredients were commercial quantities. Doubling the quantities in your case and using only a single bulk fermenting dough might alter the timing somewhat so you should monitor the dough accordingly, or else divide up front before fermenting.

Peter

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: doubling a recipe
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2010, 08:04:33 PM »
Almost every batch of dough I make contains 1 pound of flour. When I expect to make pizza for a party or for guests, I usually double the amount of every ingredient in my dough to make double size batches.

For reasons I can't quite understand (and haven't really tried to figure out), a double-sized batch of dough seems to ferment A LOT faster than my normal-sized batch of dough. I don't think it's in my head, either.

If you look closely at any of John Correll's formulas on the Encyclopizza web site (here is an example: http://www.correllconcepts.com/Encyclopizza/05_Dough-making/01_dough_recipe.htm), you'll see that Correll uses a lower percentage of yeast in his full batch than he does in his test batch.

Here’s the formula for the dough:

100 Flour
58 Water
1 ADY
1 Sugar
2 Salt
3 Oil

When I plug the figures from his full batch into a spreadsheet to convert it to a test batch expressed mostly in volumetric measurements, I get roughly the same measurements he shows in his formula, except for the yeast measurement. In the list below, Correll’s test-batch figures are shown first, followed by the measurements I’ve gotten from a lot of weighing, double-checking, and translating.

Flour: 16 oz -- 16 oz
Water: 9.25 oz -- 9.28 oz
ADY: 2.5 tsp -- 1.6 tsp
Sugar: 1.125 tsp -- 1.31tsp
Salt: 1.625 tsp -- 1.86 tsp
Oil: 0.5 oz -- 0.48 oz

That’s a big disparity, and it’s not a result of my math or scaling skills. So why does Correll use a smaller percentage of yeast in bigger batches while expressing it as if each batch size contains the same amount of yeast? I don’t know, but it does seem to me that small batches of dough require a higher ratio of yeast than large batches to get the same rate of fermentation.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2010, 09:25:16 PM by AimlessRyan »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: doubling a recipe
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2010, 10:56:17 PM »
Ryan,

The different fermentation rates may be due to the "mass effect", which is discussed at page 5 of this document: http://www.sfbi.com/pdfs/NewsF04a.pdf.

With respect to your scaling issue, you might take a look at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,909.msg8207.html#msg8207. I have observed what you have noted but in only one instance, which is discussed in the abovereferenced thread.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: doubling a recipe
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2010, 11:15:04 PM »
Ryan,

You can see in this post at Reply # 387, Peter explained to me that my larger batch of poolish might be fermenting faster because of the “mass effect”.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg94753.html#msg94753

Also in that same post he referenced this post at Reply #490 at:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg30150.html#msg30150

I have seen the results of the “mass effects”, when there is more dough.  It seems to ferment faster even if the same amounts of yeast are used for a smaller dough.

Norma
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: doubling a recipe
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2010, 12:14:54 AM »
Man, there are a million things I want to say in reply to your replies, Peter and Norma, but I don't think I can organize the stuff in a way that will make any sense. It's weird because there are so many things I've learned about pizza/baking on my own, strictly through trial and error over the last 14 years or so--that's just how I work--but now I'm being pointed toward some explanations that are pretty common knowledge among people who learned through instruction. Sometimes it's cool to find the explanations, but other times I almost don't want to know.

Or maybe I'm just glad I've figured out what happens when you do this or that before learning WHY it does this or that. For example, I figured out a long time ago that my dough ferments a lot faster when I mix a 2X batch, just by learning from experience, but now I have an idea why it does that.

Hope that made some sense to y'all.


 

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