Author Topic: Having trouble stretching dough for Artichoke Basile's Margherita recipe.  (Read 376 times)

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Offline 3pedals

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Hello All,

I've made the Artichoke Basile's Margherita pizza the other night using high gluten flour, I've been making neapolitan pizza's all summer long and never had as much of a problem stretching out the dough as I did the other night. I understand the hydration is a little lower than I use in my neapolitan but it was extremely difficult, is this normal for high gluten doughs? Anyone make the same pizza and have similar problems? I followed the directions in the cook book and let it bulk for about 1 1/2 and balled for an hour . Attached below is the recipe.

Flour - 435.2g (100%)
Water - 236.59g (54.36%)
Salt - 12g (2.75%)
IDY - 9g (2%)
Oil - 53.8g (12.36%)


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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"High gluten" high protein flour will almost always give a tougher and more elastic dough than all purpose, or lower protein content flours with all things being equal. When high protein flour is used, especially with lower dough absorption the dough typically needs to be fermented for a longer period of time. For a dough made with a high protein/high gluten flour, even with 2% IDY, a total of only 2.5-hours of total fermentation is quite short, especially in view of the 54.36 dough absorption being used and what I will assume is a hand forming technique for opening the dough ball into a pizza skin as opposed to using a mechanical dough sheeter/roller. Actually, the dough that you are making along with the dough management procedure employed isn't all that much different from an emergency dough which can save the day in a pizzeria if you find yourself out of dough for any reason, but aside from that there isn't too much to say about it. A good experiment would be to oil the dough balls immediately after forming and place in individual plastic bags (do not seal closed) instead twist the open end into a pony tail and tuck it under the dough ball as you place it in the fridge. Allow the dough balls to cold ferment for 24-hours, and 48-hours to see if that improves the way the dough opens for you. I'm betting it will. If you don't want to cold ferment try allowing the dough balls to ferment at room temperature for more than the 1.5-hours they are presently receiving, by progressively allowing the dough balls to ferment for at least 2-hours more in 30-minute increments you should see some improvement and be able to zero in on a time that allows the dough to be opened more easily.
Keep us posted on your results.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline 3pedals

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Thank you for your input, I really appreciate it. I will try it sometime this week, should I bulk ferment it? Or just ball it and let it sit?

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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3P;
I'd suggest going straight from the mixer to the bench for scaling and balling, then into the bags and directly in the fridge.  After you pull the dough out after 24 and 48-hours in the fridge, allow the bagged dough ball to set on the counter until the dough ball reaches a temperature of 50 to 55F, then turn the dough ball out of the bag into a bowl of dusting flour and proceed to open the dough into a pizza skin by your preferred manner. Whatever you do though, DO NOT work the dough after turning it out of the bag, just go straight to opening it into a pizza skin.
Let us know what your results are.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline jsaras

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Hello All,

I've made the Artichoke Basile's Margherita pizza.......Attached below is the recipe.

Flour - 435.2g (100%)
Water - 236.59g (54.36%)
Salt - 12g (2.75%)
IDY - 9g (2%)
Oil - 53.8g (12.36%)

That is a ridonculous amount of oil.   Are you sure that's correct?  That would even make Peter Reinhart blush.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline mitchjg

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That is a ridonculous amount of oil.   Are you sure that's correct?  That would even make Peter Reinhart blush.

http://www.villagevoice.com/restaurants/heres-the-recipe-for-artichoke-basille-pizzas-margherita-pie-6560104

This article shows 3 1/2 cups high gluten flour  and 1/4 cup oil.  Yep, seems "correct."
Mitch

“We hate math,” says 4 in 10 – a majority of Americans

Offline jsaras

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I wonder if this formulation is really what they use at the restaurant.  If you make it let us know how it turns out. 
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.


 

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