Author Topic: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]  (Read 5166 times)

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Offline Steve

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Re: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2005, 04:00:29 PM »
You want a nice charred crust like that Lombardi's pizza?

I suggest you have a look at this thread:

http://forum.pizzamaking.com/index.php?topic=440.0

This pizza was made using the "pizzamaking.com" NY style pizza and a regular home oven:
« Last Edit: January 22, 2005, 04:07:11 PM by Steve »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]
« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2005, 04:12:51 PM »
Snowdy,

The reason I asked about using a screen is because the dough ball produced following the Lehmann recipe you used is around 20 oz. This is at the low end of dough ball weight used by most pizza operators to make a 16-inch pizza. Most stones are not big enough to accommodate that size. If you make a smaller-diameter pizza to fit your stone size, the crust will be thicker. You can remove a piece of the dough if you'd like in the future, but you may instead want to calculate the amounts of ingredients you will need to make a dough that will almost exactly fit your stone. Maybe I have already worked up a recipe at the Lehmann thread that will work for your size of stone, so if you will let me know what size your stone is (and whether it is round or rectangular), I can look into it. The pizza screen, particularly a 16-inch screen, is a good idea because it allows you to make a 16-inch pizza and cook it until it sets up and becomes firm, at which time you can slide it onto your pizza stone for final browning. The pizza will hang over the side of your stone a bit but it will be rigid at that point. Some people like using the screen alone, but my preference to date is to use both the screen and pizza stone for the 16-inch size.

I also temperature control the water I use in my pizza dough recipes, to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80 degrees F. Not everyone does this, but apparently member DINKS does--in order to achieve consistency from one dough to the next. With me, it has become a habit. If you are interested in knowing how to calculate the water temperature to use, you can refer to some of the postings at the Lehmann NY pizza dough thread. Also, just because the Fleishchmann yeast package says that temperatures over 120 degrees F can be used, that doesn't mean that you should do so. Many of the so-called "Rapid Rise" yeasts were developed to allow one to make a pizza in record time. In fact, if you go to the Fleischmann's website you will find many pizza recipes but just about all of them are intended to be made in about an hour or so. Fleischmann's markets differently to pizza operators than to consumers, and, according to an email exchange I had with Fleischmann's, even promotes a somewhat different strain of yeast for professional bakers.

Another point to keep in mind is that a NY style dough like the Lehmann dough normally requires about an hour or two at room temperature (after coming out of the refrigerator) before shaping. After that, the dough should be OK for about another 2 to 3 hours. In my experience, when I am making several pizzas one after the other, the last piece of dough is usually the easiest to handle.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 22, 2005, 04:26:15 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline snowdy

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Re: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2005, 04:14:49 PM »
awesome!! my oven only goes to 500 but should be able to try this and get it going hotter for sure!!!
got an adventure for next week :)

Offline snowdy

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Re: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2005, 04:39:54 PM »
Hey Peter... thanks for the reply man :)

the Lehmann dough was actually smaller of a ball than the pizzamaking.com dough... but it wouldnt stretch as far for some reason.. i got it out as far as i could which was about 12 inches.

It was sitting out for about 3 1/2 hours at room temperature.

I think part of the problem of it turning out too thick was my inexperience in stretching it out.... It was tearing but maybe i should have just started over and gave it another try.

I can fit about a 15" pizza onto my stone.

I'll have to try this recipe again.

What water temperature do you start with to maintain the dough temperature?

Also, the pizzamaking.com recipe said to mix it for 15 minutes, after that long that dough felt pretty cold to me. is that okay or should it always stay warm until youre ready to refridgerate it?

I only mixed the lehmann dough for about 8 minutes.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]
« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2005, 05:35:40 PM »
Snowdy,

I don't believe I ever calculated the ingredients for a 15-inch Lehmann NY style pizza dough. I am away from home at the moment but will calculate the quantities you will need for the 15-inch on the plane on my way back to Texas (if the snow doesn't mess up my trip).

The water temperature I use is based on the temperature of the room where I am making the dough, the temperature of the flour I am using, and the frictional temperature of the machine I am using to do the kneading, such as a stand mixer or food processor. If you can tell me what kind and make of machine you are using, I can give you a rough idea of the frictional temperature to use to calculate the water temperature, along with the simple formula for calculating the water temperature.

I will also give you some simple instructions for making the dough for the 15-inch size, based on the machine you are using, if it is a fairly standard unit. BTW, the recipe you used called for more yeast (IDY) than it should have. I arrived at 1 1/2 teaspoons through a math error. The pizza dough worked out very well nonetheless, but I have more recently been using a much smaller amount of yeast. You can go either way on this, but I will do the calculations both ways so that you have either option. I will also lower the hydration percentage a bit (i.e., the amount of water used relative to the weight of flour), so that the dough handles well while also achieving a crust that will be open and airy.

Peter

Offline snowdy

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Re: Friday Night New York Style... [PICS]
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2005, 07:29:18 PM »
Hey Peter...
thanks for all your help!

This is my mixer:

http://www.kitchenaid.com/catalog/product.jsp?src=STAND%20MIXERS&categoryId=310&productId=348

Can't wait to give this another go next friday.


 

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