Author Topic: fresh mozzarella curd  (Read 12162 times)

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Offline fcbuilder

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fresh mozzarella curd
« on: February 07, 2009, 01:29:02 PM »
I live in southern California and i have been trying to find a place that sells fresh mozzarella curd. I know on the internet i can find it but most of these company's are on the east coast and the shipping is double the amount the curd costs.So dose anybody know of a place i could find it. thanks


Offline Jackitup

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2009, 01:34:56 PM »
I know this doesn't answer your question, but have you tried making homemade mozz? It comes out pretty darned good the few times I've made it. Haven't gotten around to ordering some more rennet to do same again. It's actually a very easy process.
Jon
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Offline fcbuilder

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2009, 05:30:22 PM »
I know this doesn't answer your question, but have you tried making homemade mozz? It comes out pretty darned good the few times I've made it. Haven't gotten around to ordering some more rennet to do same again. It's actually a very easy process.
Jon
That is probably what I am going to have to do. Do you have any links on the net to do that. When I lived in ny it was easy to go out and buy the curd in the store ,here it is difficult . Today I went to go find rennet and citric acid but couldn't find either. However I did find un homogenized milk , which was good. I guess I will have to order supplies from the net thanks fc.

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2009, 10:27:08 PM »
fcbuilder,

This is a pretty good site:  http://www.cheesemaking.com/cheesemakingingredients.html
They have "beginner kits" as well as most ingredients.

You might also try looking for a homebrew (beer and wine) store near you.  They often carry cheese making supplies, too, since they already carry other related items (citric acid and cheesecloth, for instance).

~sd
Never trust a skinny cook!

Offline fcbuilder

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2009, 01:18:03 AM »
fcbuilder,

This is a pretty good site:  http://www.cheesemaking.com/cheesemakingingredients.html
They have "beginner kits" as well as most ingredients.

You might also try looking for a homebrew (beer and wine) store near you.  They often carry cheese making supplies, too, since they already carry other related items (citric acid and cheesecloth, for instance).

~sd
thanks sourdough girl I will do that . fc

Offline Frankie G

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2009, 12:31:53 PM »
I have seen the curd at Trader Joes.

And ... I may be a fool... but doesn't one need curd to make fresh mozz?

Frankie g

Offline fcbuilder

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2009, 01:20:50 PM »
I have seen the curd at Trader Joes.

And ... I may be a fool... but doesn't one need curd to make fresh mozz?

Frankie g
    Thanks , You can either make the curd youself or buy it from a cheese company like grande. I will check trader Joe's there is one down the block from me. Hey is Frankie your given name? I am Frankie c. and Frankie is my given name and people are  always wondering what my real name is.. funny.

Offline jimd

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2009, 06:27:21 PM »
I have tried three different brands of curd. The one I have found to be the best, for my taste, is Polly-O--I know that Polly-O makes commercial mozzarella which is just ok, but I believe their fresh curd comes out creamier than the others. I buy mine from a local Italian Deli that uses the curd to make their own mozzarella. The owner of the shop also prefers Polly-o. BTW, they charge me $6.50 a pound, which is probably twice the wholesale price, but I get to buy as  much or as little as I want. (If you do buy more than you need, it can be frozen and later defrosted, but defrost in the fridge for a day so that the whey does not separate out---you do lose a little texture and creaminess when using frozen curd, but it is still very very good.) It is worth trying to get your hands on some curd and practicing a bit. I could still use improvement, but guests are really wowed when they see you stretch and serve your fresh mutz.

Jim

Offline dzpiez

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2009, 04:01:18 AM »
Hey fcbuilder,
if ya find any fresh mozz curd let me know, I'm in SoCal too and been lookin' for some time now.  I know a few pizzerias in the L.A. area that use Polly-O, but can't get my hands on any.

Offline jeff v

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2009, 11:05:10 AM »
Sorry to jump in late here, but living in WI there are plenty of places that sell mozz curd-I can just go in and ask. That's what I did before I found the place I use currently. I would say to seek out some producers and ask if they'll ship you some. You should be able to do the same thing in CA.

Try- www.cedargrovecheese.com, I walked in and asked if they'd sell me some raw curd and voilla! Most of the places I found didn't offer raw curd-I had to ask for it specifically.

Before I did this I actually found some on eBay!  :-D I can't remeber where they shipped from though.

Best,

Jeff


Offline fcbuilder

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2009, 12:33:26 PM »
thanks Jeff ,It is a challenge here in southern California to find places that make there own fresh mozzarella . I am from NY and could go to any Italian deli and they would give the curd to me.I went to a deli here named Claro's and asked if they had any fresh mozz curd and they looked at me like i had two heads.Anyway thank you for the info I will give them a try. FC

Offline Pizza Rustica

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2009, 10:54:37 PM »
FC,

Check out this link for Bubalus Bubalis a "real mozzarella di bufala" maker in Southern California. http://www.realmozzarella.com/index.php

I have not personally tried their cheese. They are in So. Cal. I am sure you could probably buy some curd from them. Let us know more about them if you decide to order. I am interested in trying the process as well. Also, in the most recent issue of gourmet magazine they had an article on making Mozz from curd.
Russ

Offline RadarRick

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2009, 02:20:50 AM »
Here is a easy and quick way to make Mozzarella at home WITHOUT buying curd....you are making the curd yourself....Did I mention this is pretty easy. ENJOY! Good resources at the bootom of this post also.

History
Daphne started the evening by introducing herself as a "Cheese Maturer", with the Artisanal Cheese Center (she is Director of Affinage) and then gave us a brief history of Italian mozzarella. According to Daphne, mozzarella has been produced in the Puglia region of Italy ("the heel of the boot of Italy") for at least 300 years, in part because the it's a hospitable region for Indian water buffalo -- extremely large, difficult, and tempermental beasts that like to wallow in slightly salty marshes. During World War II, the Germans slaughtered all of the buffalo in Italy, to resulting in complete eradication. The population was partially restored by importing water buffalo from India.

In Italy, mozzarella is eaten very fresh. It is made in the morning, and is considered past its prime if not eaten the same day. This is in part because they use cultures that develop very quickly. In the U.S., slower developing cultures are used to extend the "freshness" of mozzarella. Today in the U.S., production of dry, industrial mozzarella -- the kind you find shredded at the grocery store -- is greater than the production of all other cheeses combined.

Making Mozzarella
There are basically two steps to make mozarella -- transforming milk into curd, and then transforming the curd into mozzarella through a stretching process. In this course we focused on the second step, stretching the mozzarella, which I have detailed below.

After you have prepared your curd, you will want to cut it into small pieces. Next you'll want to prepare a brine bath. Add 1 cup of salt to 2 gallons of room temperature water. Stir to dissolve, then add ice to chill the brine. You'll also need a bath of very hot water, just below boiling. Take a handful of curd pieces, about the size of a tennis ball, and carefully place them in the hot water bath, so that they retain their ball-shape. Do not stir or disturb the curd, just let it rest in the hot bath until it begins to melt. You can check for its readiness by making sure all the curd pieces are sticking together. Once its ready, remove the ball from the hot water bath, then stretch the mozzarella by folding it backwards, like you would while kneading bread. Fold just until it is fully melted and free of clumps. The outer skin should appear very pearly and shiny. Make a final fold, then pinch edges together to form a ball, and place in the the iced brine bath.

Below is the recipe we were provided with for making mozzarella at home. Note that the technique for stretching mozzarella varies slightly from the one we used. I have yet to try this at home, but I suspect the technique we used in class will prevent over-working the mozzarella and is closer to foolproof.

Making Fresh Mozzarella at Home
*This recipe and information was adapted from the book Home Cheese Making by Ricki Carroll, copyright 2002*

Ingredients
2 teaspoons citric acid
1 gallon pasteurized whole milk (not ultra-pasteurized)
1/4 teaspoon liquid rennet diluted in 1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon salt

Procedure

Pour milk into a large pot.

Add citric acid to the milk and mix thoroughly.

Gently stir in the diluted rennet with an up and down motion, continue heating until the temperature reaches 105 degrees. Turn off the heat and the curd set for 5-10 minutes.

Scoop out the curds with a slotted spoon and put into a large bowl. Press the curds gently with your hands, pouring off as much whey as possible. Reserve the whey.

Heat the reserved wehy to at least 175 degrees. Add salt to the whey or directly to the curd.

Ladle hot whey over the curd and begin to knead with 2 wooden spoons until the curd is smooth and pliable.

The internal temperature of the curd needs to reach around 165 degrees to become pliable and stretchy. If the curd breaks, it needs to be reheated.

When the cheese becomes smooth and shiny, it is ready to eat. Eat warm or save covered in the refrigerator.

Yield: 3/4 - 1 pound

Mozzarella Tasting
After everyone had a chance to make their own ovilini, we moved on to the cheese tasting. We tasted seven different cheeses in all. In the photo of my tasting plate, the first cheese listed below, the Arthur Avenue Mozzarella, is just above the fork at approximately four o'clock, then you can follow along moving clockwise. Here are the cheeses we tasted, along with my very brief, non-expert notes on each:




Fresh Domestic Mozzarella (ovolini), Arthur Avenue, Bronx: dense, corky texture. milk-flavored.

Domestic Buffalo, Star Hill Dairy, Vermont: smoother in texture than the Arthur Ave, slightly sour/tangy, slight cream.

Mozzarella di Buffala, Puglia, Italy: spongy texture, almost citric undertone. a favorite..

Oaxaca, The Mozzarella Company, Texas: Mexican mozzarella, wrapped like a ribbon instead of solid ball. creamy, light yellow.

Capriella, The Mozzarella Company, Texas: Made from goat's milk. dense.

Cacciocavalo Polodico, Gufannti, Sicily Italy: aged mozzarella. strong, sharp, peppery. A favorite.

Provolone Mandarone, Guffanti Italy: another aged mozzarella, made in northern Italy then taken south to age by the sea. "hung in the sea breeze" for 9 months. size of large pumpkin! also sharp tasting.


Overall, the course was great fun and educational; I'll definitely consider attending another of their course offerings or tastings in the future. My only complaint was that we didn't get more hands-on insight into making curd. The next Hands-On Mozzarella course is June 30th, and registration is available online.

Resources
Artisanal Cheese Center
Arthur Avenue, Bronx
DiPalo's
Mozzarella Company
New England Cheesemaking Supply Company
Starhill Dairy

Ricky

Offline dzpiez

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2009, 03:40:56 AM »
Fcbuilder is right, it is hard to find anyone here in SoCal how makes there own cheese using curd.  And the ones who do makes you feel like the curd is worth it's weight in gold.  But thanks for the info RadarRick, maybe I will go ahead and get a kit and make my own curd.

Dave

Offline Frankie G

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2009, 02:01:12 PM »
    Thanks , You can either make the curd youself or buy it from a cheese company like grande. I will check trader Joe's there is one down the block from me. Hey is Frankie your given name? I am Frankie c. and Frankie is my given name and people are  always wondering what my real name is.. funny.

Hey Frankie C... Frankie G here!  yep...  my name at birth is Frank (jr.) so everyone calls me Frankie since I was a boy... 

Thanks for everyone's help in this topic..

frankie G

Offline dzpiez

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2009, 04:24:36 AM »
Hey RadarRick,
Did you ever try making your own mozzarella?  I just got a kit today, need to pick up a gallon on milk and give it a try.

Offline Jersey Pizza Pride

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Re: fresh mozzarella curd
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2009, 09:58:25 PM »
http://www.dibruno.com/Detail.bok?no=196

Didn't see if they ship to Cali but I'm guessing they do.  Good luck.