Author Topic: February 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Less is More"  (Read 14139 times)

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Offline jeff v

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Re: February Challenge = LESS WORK PIZZA
« Reply #40 on: February 24, 2009, 04:29:43 PM »
Jeff,

It doesn't look like it turned out all that bad.  If you ever decide to try it again, maybe you could start with a spray of water on the pan before starting the pile of flour.

- red.november

Yes it was actually edible! The water is a good idea should I make it again.

Thanks for the idea,

Jeff
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.


Offline scott r

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Re: February Challenge = LESS WORK PIZZA
« Reply #41 on: February 25, 2009, 02:54:54 AM »
I know I am stretching the theme a bit here, but I recently had an amazing pizza,  ok I can't believe I am saying this,  an amazing FROZEN pizza from Trader Joes.

This pizza was not only easy to procure, but it also had less work going on inside of it as I noticed that there was no yeast or any other levening agent in there at all.   I have read about this type of quickee crust before on the forum, and had dismissed the idea, but now that I have tried it I think I want to do it from scratch.

Do yourself a favor and check out the Trader Joes Tarte Alsace.  I found it interesting that they don't call it a pizza anywhere on the packaging, but it is definitely the best frozen pizza I have ever had, and all that with no yeast.

Offline jeff v

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Re: February Challenge = LESS WORK PIZZA
« Reply #42 on: February 25, 2009, 10:36:53 AM »
I know I am stretching the theme a bit here, but I recently had an amazing pizza,  ok I can't believe I am saying this,  an amazing FROZEN pizza from Trader Joes.

This pizza was not only easy to procure, but it also had less work going on inside of it as I noticed that there was no yeast or any other levening agent in there at all.   I have read about this type of quickee crust before on the forum, and had dismissed the idea, but now that I have tried it I think I want to do it from scratch.

Do yourself a favor and check out the Trader Joes Tarte Alsace.  I found it interesting that they don't call it a pizza anywhere on the packaging, but it is definitely the best frozen pizza I have ever had, and all that with no yeast.


French pizza-  ::)

Just when I thought I had no reason to return to TJ's, I'll try this one for sure. I have made the pissaladiere recipe from Cook's Illustrated (which I liked) but then I had to punch myself for trying to use a French accent so haven't made it again.  8)
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline scott r

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Re: February Challenge = LESS WORK PIZZA
« Reply #43 on: February 25, 2009, 12:03:16 PM »
A dear friend of min that grew up in the alsacian region is the person who turned me on to this product.  She says it is exactly like she remembered it from growing up, and that they were very very popular, even made by her school for lunch.

From Wikipedia:
Tarte flambée is an Alsatian dish composed of thin bread dough rolled out in a circle or a rectangle, which is covered by crème fraîche, onions and bacon. It is one of the most famous gastronomical specialties of the region.
Depending on the area of the region, this dish can be called in Alsatian flammekueche, in German Flammkuchen, or, in French, tarte flambée.
Legend says that the creators of this dish were those Alsatian farmers who used to bake bread once a week. A tarte flambée would be used to test the heat of their wood-fired ovens. At the peak of its temperature, the oven would also have the ideal conditions in which to bake a tarte flambée. The embers would be pushed aside to make room for the tarte in the middle of the oven, and the intense heat would be able to bake it in 1 or 2 minutes. The crust that forms the border of the tarte flambée would be nearly burned by the flames.
The name itself comes from this method of baking, the English translation of the original Alsatian name meaning "baked in the flames".
In some parts of Alsace the crème fraîche may be replaced by fromage blanc (similar to Quark), or by a mixture of half fromage blanc and half crème fraîche. The result resembles a thin pizza.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: February 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Less is More"
« Reply #44 on: February 26, 2009, 09:20:41 AM »
There is already a thread on this style of pizza:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5581.msg47245.html#msg47245

Bill/SFNM

Offline November

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Re: February 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Less is More"
« Reply #45 on: February 26, 2009, 08:44:08 PM »
We're near the end of the month so here is a list of ideas in case anyone was running low.  I'm saving my favorite to do this weekend.

Less baked: don't bake the pizza at all
Less evolved: amoebae shaped
Less aerodynamic: concave square shaped
Less motion: stop sign shaped, red sauce visible, "STOP" printed with cheese
Less pizza: baked with a slice already cut out of it
Less pizza 2: baked as a single slice
Less appealing: topped with Clamato sauce, limburger cheese, escargot
Less edible: cut out a corrugated cardboard circle, soak it in yeast water for an hour, drain liquid, ferment, top, and bake
Less edible 2: mix, knead, ferment, shape, and top pizza while ingredients are directly on the floor
Less less: make an enormous pizza
Less eligible: bake a cake that's frosted to look like a pizza
Less safe: top with raw spoiled meat
Less flat: stand all the pepperoni on their edges and bake the pizza on a severely warped pan
Less bumpy: use sandpaper to sand the crust rim until smooth
Less sensible: throw the pizza away after baking
Less thrifty: use the most expensive ingredients available, e.g. caviar
Less permeable: coat with Thompson's WaterSeal after baking
Less natural: silicone rim implants
Less visible: mix spinach and green food dye into dough (camouflage effect); top with green sauce, sparse cheese, and green bell peppers; and take a picture against a foliage backdrop
Less shaping: top dough ball with sauce, cheese, and some other toppings, do not shape into skin
Less repeatable: don't measure anything
Less equation: small pizza, two breadsticks (equal sign), large pizza
Less than: shape pizza like a less than sign
Less domestic: use only imported ingredients and slap a "Made in China" label on it
Less sober: use straight beer for the liquid in the dough
Less repetition: find a wheel of cheese that can cover the whole pizza with a single slice, same for other toppings
Less work: get someone else to do it
Less destructible: lay rebar (chicken wire) in between layers of dough
Less relevant: bake a bean casserole

- red.november

Offline Essen1

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Re: February 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Less is More"
« Reply #46 on: February 26, 2009, 11:38:36 PM »
Quote
Less destructible: lay rebar (chicken wire) in between layers of dough

By all means, don't stop yourself at giving it a shot. But I sincerely hope that you have a good dentist's number handy. You'll need it, my friend.  8)
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline waco_huber

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Re: February 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Less is More"
« Reply #47 on: February 27, 2009, 05:47:39 PM »
Less sober: use straight beer for the liquid in the dough

Tried this as a modification to the Lehman New York style... >:D  Better skin color in a low temp home oven, but it was just Budweiser (not all that different than filtered water :-D)

Offline November

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Less Portable Is More Secure
« Reply #48 on: February 28, 2009, 08:33:00 PM »
For those days you want to reduce the chance your pizza "walks away," nail it to the countertop.

- red.november

Offline davtrent

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Re: "Less is More" Recession Pizza
« Reply #49 on: March 31, 2009, 02:15:38 PM »
As a matter of fact, what you bought was ConAgra Mill's Minnesota Girl flour.  It has a protein content of 11.8%.  See their brochure and notice that the suggested uses are the same.

http://www.conagramills.com/media/ConAgraMillsBrochure.pdf

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=10250592&whse=BD_823&Ne=4000000&eCat=BD_823|9896|10035&N=4031138&Mo=7&No=5&Nr=P_CatalogName:BD_823&cat=10694&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&topnav=bdoff



Prior to reading this post, I contacted ConAgra Mills and requested the product specification for their Harvest Bread flour distributed through Costco.  I also asked  which of their Bakery flours was most similar to Harvest.

Lynne Foxvog (ConAgra SE Regional Sales) said that Harvest bread flour has a protein level of 11.3  +/-0.3%. 

She said Harvest is most similar to ConAgra H&R (hotel & restaurant) which has a protein level of 11.0  +/- 2.0%.

However, given the wide range of allowable protein in H&R (9.0% - 13%), it's possible that Harvest could be closer to Minnesota Girl (11.8  +/-.3%).

I'm going to buy a bag and see how it works for me.  In any event, 50 lbs. of  flour will keep a sourdough culture alive for quite a while, even if its pizza dough making properties are less than stellar. 


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: February Challenge = LESS WORK PIZZA
« Reply #50 on: April 08, 2009, 02:02:00 PM »
I know I am stretching the theme a bit here, but I recently had an amazing pizza,  ok I can't believe I am saying this,  an amazing FROZEN pizza from Trader Joes.

This pizza was not only easy to procure, but it also had less work going on inside of it as I noticed that there was no yeast or any other levening agent in there at all.   I have read about this type of quickee crust before on the forum, and had dismissed the idea, but now that I have tried it I think I want to do it from scratch.

Do yourself a favor and check out the Trader Joes Tarte Alsace.  I found it interesting that they don't call it a pizza anywhere on the packaging, but it is definitely the best frozen pizza I have ever had, and all that with no yeast.


Scott,

I had one of these for lunch today. Not pizza, but not bad. In fact, I really enjoyed it. Thanks for posting about this.

Bill/SFNM

Offline Chocolatesa

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Re: February 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Less is More"
« Reply #51 on: April 15, 2009, 04:18:05 PM »
We're near the end of the month so here is a list of ideas in case anyone was running low.  I'm saving my favorite to do this weekend.

Less baked: don't bake the pizza at all
Less evolved: amoebae shaped
Less aerodynamic: concave square shaped
Less motion: stop sign shaped, red sauce visible, "STOP" printed with cheese
Less pizza: baked with a slice already cut out of it
Less pizza 2: baked as a single slice
Less appealing: topped with Clamato sauce, limburger cheese, escargot
Less edible: cut out a corrugated cardboard circle, soak it in yeast water for an hour, drain liquid, ferment, top, and bake
Less edible 2: mix, knead, ferment, shape, and top pizza while ingredients are directly on the floor
Less less: make an enormous pizza
Less eligible: bake a cake that's frosted to look like a pizza
Less safe: top with raw spoiled meat
Less flat: stand all the pepperoni on their edges and bake the pizza on a severely warped pan
Less bumpy: use sandpaper to sand the crust rim until smooth
Less sensible: throw the pizza away after baking
Less thrifty: use the most expensive ingredients available, e.g. caviar
Less permeable: coat with Thompson's WaterSeal after baking
Less natural: silicone rim implants
Less visible: mix spinach and green food dye into dough (camouflage effect); top with green sauce, sparse cheese, and green bell peppers; and take a picture against a foliage backdrop
Less shaping: top dough ball with sauce, cheese, and some other toppings, do not shape into skin
Less repeatable: don't measure anything
Less equation: small pizza, two breadsticks (equal sign), large pizza
Less than: shape pizza like a less than sign
Less domestic: use only imported ingredients and slap a "Made in China" label on it
Less sober: use straight beer for the liquid in the dough
Less repetition: find a wheel of cheese that can cover the whole pizza with a single slice, same for other toppings
Less work: get someone else to do it
Less destructible: lay rebar (chicken wire) in between layers of dough
Less relevant: bake a bean casserole

- red.november

Rofl!!! :D I think I'm gonna like this forum :P


 

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