Author Topic: all purpose flour  (Read 1186 times)

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Offline mpiasec

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all purpose flour
« on: February 02, 2009, 01:20:03 PM »
what kind of a pie crust does apf make does it matter what kind of flour bread or apf


Offline JConk007

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Re: all purpose flour
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 01:27:55 PM »
Pizza Pie crust?
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: all purpose flour
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 01:54:12 PM »
what kind of a pie crust does apf make does it matter what kind of flour bread or apf

mpiasec,

I will assume for the following discussion that you are talking about pizza dough. In that context, there is a difference between using all-purpose flour and bread flour, and any other flour for that matter. Maybe a simple comparison of flours, for example, three basic flours from King Arthur that are commonly used to make pizza dough, will help. Those flours are the KA all-purpose flour, the KA bread flour, and the KA Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour

For background purposes, the KA all-purpose flour has a protein content of 11.7%; the KA bread flour has a protein content of 12.7%; the King Arthur high-gluten flour has a protein content of 14.2%. As you move up the protein scale, you can expect the following effects:

1. The flour will be able to hold more water (for a given weight of flour), and the dough, if properly prepared, should have a more developed gluten structure that is able to better retain the gases of fermentation, resulting in a greater rise in the dough and a better volume in the finished crust.

2. The "window" of usability of the dough should be longer, that is, it can tolerate longer fermentation times without overfermenting.

3. The finished crust will be chewier, and with more color and taste.

Of course, other things used in a dough will also have their own independent effects. To eliminate having to discuss those effects, the above example assumes that only flour, water, salt and yeast are used.

Peter





 

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