Author Topic: Anyone know where to get Simpson Crushed San Marzanos  (Read 1148 times)

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Offline gfgman

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Anyone know where to get Simpson Crushed San Marzanos
« on: February 05, 2009, 09:37:04 AM »
I'm curious if anyone has tried the San Marzanos from Simpson imports, and where you found them.  I discovered them on Sanibel Island, in Florida.  They made a fantastic pizza sauce as well as an awesome salsa and a great red pasta sauce.  I understand the company is based in NJ.  Being from PA, and having family in NJ, I thought they would be easy to find, but I've had no luck so far. 
The crushed variety is a white label with purple stripe on the top and bottom.  It is crushed and diced together, and nothing else.  I'll have to dig up a picture I found and post it.  I can order them online, but the price is too high, in my opinion. 
I tried something from a store in NJ that was crushed with salt, and I've tried Delallo, which has basil added.  Both have a good taste, but have too much water compared to the Simpson product.

GMan


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Anyone know where to get Simpson Crushed San Marzanos
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 09:58:27 AM »
GMan,

I have not tried the Simpson Ltd San Marzano tomatoes in some time, but when I did try them I did not like them. You should be aware, as the label notes (you may have to search for it), that the San Marzano tomatoes are grown in the U.S., apparently from San Marzano varietal seeds. That is something that a lot of people may not know, especially since the label uses Italian words (like pomodoro pelati) and graphics that might lead one to believe that the tomatoes are San Marzano tomatoes imported from the area around Naples where the authentic San Marzanos are grown in volcanic soil. Of course, none of this is of any consequence if you like them, especially if they are priced right. Where I live in the Dallas area, the Simpson product costs more than the authentic San Marzanos imported from Italy. The ones I saw recently are like those shown at http://farawayfoods.com/sanmarzano.html.

Peter

Offline gfgman

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Re: Anyone know where to get Simpson Crushed San Marzanos
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009, 10:11:22 AM »
I have friends in the Dallas area, and considered asking them if they've seen this product.  You've answered that one!
I'm aware that they are not imported.  I thought it a bit odd that they could even label their product as san Marzano. 
I think I paid around $3, which is a bit steep to me given how often I would use them.  I thought they might be cheaper closer to the source.  It's fascinating that they are available where you are, but not here in PA. 

GMan

Offline David

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Re: Anyone know where to get Simpson Crushed San Marzanos
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2009, 10:25:40 AM »
I believe some of the Wholefoods stores in NJ had these on sale recently.
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Anyone know where to get Simpson Crushed San Marzanos
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2009, 10:26:04 AM »
GMan,

I saw the Simpson product last Saturday in Dallas at The Central Market, at Greenville and Lovers Lane. I believe the price was around $3.59 a can.

If you research the subject, I think you will find a lot of abuse surrounding the San Marzano name. Companies will use the name in a trademark sense and they might refer to the city of San Marzano, or to the San Marzano "region". It is usually done in a way that I think is intended to deceive. The true (authentic) San Marzanos bear special labels denoting their authenticity. I think it is also important to keep in mind that not all imported San Marzano tomatoes are great. Some of the best ones don't make their way to the U.S. Also, there can be variations from crop to crop that results in getting a bad can from time to time. You also need to look at when the tomatoes were harvested or canned, especially at stores where the inventory doesn't turn over all that quickly.

Peter