Author Topic: Chicago Style Pizza Definition  (Read 3140 times)

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Offline Randy

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Chicago Style Pizza Definition
« on: September 22, 2003, 06:09:09 PM »
We really had some great input on the New York style pizza definition.  I wonder if those people on this forum that have eaten a Chicago  style pizza could give us a good description or definition.  As an example, do all Chicago style pizzas have a cornmeal flavor to them?  Are the pans the pizzas are cooked on all sloped on the sides or straight up and down?

There are many questions to be answered for those of us that have not had the good fortune to eat a pizza in Chicago.

Randy


Offline Steve

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Re:Chicago Style Pizza Definition
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2003, 10:05:27 PM »
I've been to Chicago a dozen or so times. Eaten mostly at Due's. I've been told that Giordano's is one of the best pizzerias in Chicago and is known for deep dish pizza. The finished product has been described as having a biscuit-like texture with a hint of butter. Use a 2" straight-sided pizza pan.
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Offline buzz

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Re:Chicago Style Pizza Definition
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2003, 11:26:23 AM »
No cornmeal in Chicago-style deep dish pizza (at least none detectable)--Pat Bruno says they uses a food coloring called "egg shade" (yellow).

All the pans I've seen have straight sides.

Offline Steve

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Re:Chicago Style Pizza Definition
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2003, 11:48:57 AM »
(taken from http://www.pmq.com/mag/2003winter/pizzatypes.shtml)

Chicago Style

One of the identifying features of Chicago style pizza is its deep dish. In 1943, Ike Sewell created a deep-dish pizza. Ike's belief was if you made a pizza with massive amounts of ingredients (especially sausage) it would become a hearty meal choice for people. He was right, so he opened Pizzeria Uno, which specialized in deep-dish pizza and started the Chicago style phenomenon. Chicago style pizza is usually eaten with a knife and fork rather than the hands because it is so thick and heavy. The dough, which contrary to many beliefs, is not really thick, but has a biscuit-like texture and has raised high on the sides of seasoned deep dish pans to hold all of the ingredients in. The cheese is placed directly on the dough and toppings added on top of that. The top is cheesed and sauced with a chunky sauce with a light sprinkling of cheese scattered on top of the sauce. Cooking times are usually longer due to the overall thickness of the pizza. The dough used for this style usually contains between 10.5 and 11.5 percent protein and is under-mixed (not smooth). Table grade margarine is used in the pans to add a slight, fried crispness, contribute to the rich flavor and to aid as a release agent in helping to get the baked pizzas out of the pan.
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Offline DKM

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Re:Chicago Style Pizza Definition
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2003, 11:57:30 AM »
The dough, which contrary to many beliefs, is not really thick, but has a biscuit-like texture and has raised high on the sides of seasoned deep dish pans to hold all of the ingredients in.

That sounds familiar!  ;D ;D ;D
I'm on too many of these boards


 

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