Author Topic: Using the lehmann dough calculator  (Read 1242 times)

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Offline gfgman

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Using the lehmann dough calculator
« on: February 07, 2009, 01:51:54 PM »
Hey all.  I have a question for anybody who would like to answer.  I used the lehmann dough calculator for the first time to make a ball of dough.  I used my bread machine to mix it, which leaves no residue.  According to the calculator it calls for .57 lbs of flour, which translates to 2 cups and slightly less than 1/8 cup.  (I used bread flour) It called for 5.79 ounces of water, which I measured out with a glass cup that had ounce markings on it.  The amount of yeast called for is .34 tsp for ADY, which seems like quite a bit less than I would normally use for a ball of dough, which is maybe 1/3 of a package. 
Anyway, I put the yeast in the water first and let it sit, then added everything else.  The final product looked like a pile of dry bubble gum pieces.  I rubbed it with a little oil and have it in the fridge to sit overnight.  I'm curiuos if it is really supposed to be like that, or if I did something wrong. 

Here's the numbers I used and what the calculator gave me
.1 thickness, 1 ball of dough, 14 inch round, 63% hydration, .5% ADY, 1% kosher salt, 1.5% oil, 1.5% sugar, and 0% residue. 
Lehmann Calculator
Flour (100%):    260.55 g  |  9.19 oz | 0.57 lbs
Water (63%):    164.14 g  |  5.79 oz | 0.36 lbs
ADY (.5%):    1.3 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.34 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
Salt (1%):    2.61 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.77 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
Oil (1.5%):    3.91 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.87 tsp | 0.29 tbsp
Sugar (1.5%):    3.91 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.98 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
Total (167.5%):   436.41 g | 15.39 oz | 0.96 lbs | TF = 0.1

Thanks for the help!

GMan



Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Using the lehmann dough calculator
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2009, 02:35:11 PM »
GMan,

You didn't indicate what brand of bread flour you used, and what kind of measuring cup you used to measure out the flour, but 9.19 ounces of the King Arthur bread flour translates into 2 c. plus about 1 3/8 t. For the Harvest King (Better for Bread) flour, it would be 2 c. plus 2 t. plus about 7/8 t. These numbers are from the Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator (http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/) using the Textbook method of flour conversion. If you used a different flour measuring method, you could have ended up with more flour and, hence, a drier dough.

It appears that you may also have made a mistake in measuring out the water. The water given in the table you posted is by weight, not volume. That amount, 5.79 oz., translates volumetrically into 1/2 c. plus 2 t. plus about 1/3 t. In my Pyrex glass measuring cup, 5.79 oz. is somewhere between 2/3 c. and 3/4 c. However, it looks like your mistake would have made a wetter dough, not a drier one.

If you can tell us how you measured out whatever bread flour you used and how you got 2 cups and slightly less than 1/8 c. flour, we may be able to tell where, if anywhere, you went wrong. I checked out the numbers you posted from the Lehmann dough calculator and they are correct. 

Peter
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 05:01:43 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline gfgman

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Re: Using the lehmann dough calculator
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2009, 02:53:47 PM »
Pete,

I used the pyrex measuring cup, and you're right on with the amount of water I used.  I found a website that indicated that 1 pound of flour is 4 cups.  I worked backwards from there.  .5 lbs would be two cups.  The remaining .07 works out to slighly less than 1/8 cup.  It seems like the water is right on.  In my normal dough recipe I use 1/3 cup water per cup of flour, and I don't use oil.  If I'm mixing by hand, I don't get the full two cups of flour in.  In the bread machine, though, I put the full amount in and it doesn't usually come out so dry.  I would think that a ball of dough that came out that dry is not going to magically change into a perfect ball of dough just by letting it sit in the fridge overnight. 
I was mainly curious to check out the taste difference by letting it sit, and what kind of difference I get with the oil, and with different amounts of salt and sugar.  I typically get a nice crispy crust, but the middle tends to get soggy.  Even thickness seems to be the problem there, which is why I wanted to try a different dough formulation and see if I can get more elasticity to it, like the local pizza shops.  Better flour would help also.  I was using King Arthur, but changed to gold medal when the price doubled.  I suppose I could get one for Pizza, and the cheaper flour for anything else I would use bread flour for.

GMan


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Using the lehmann dough calculator
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2009, 03:15:13 PM »
GMan,

I wouldn't give up just yet with the dough you made. Nominally, the hydration you used was 63%. However, if you mis-measured the amount of flour, the hydration may have dropped several percentage points. But, a hydration of about 56-59% should still work in your case, if your actual hydration actually fell into that range. That range is one that many pizza operators intentionally use because it makes the dough easier to handle and shape into skins. In your case, you might let the dough ferment a day more to compensate for the fact that a low hydration ferments more slowly than a high hydration dough. The amount of yeast you used, 0.50% ADY, should allow you to get that extra day without the dough overfermenting.

I hope you will let us know how your dough and pizza, if you get to that point, work out.

Peter

Offline gfgman

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Re: Using the lehmann dough calculator
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2009, 03:30:51 PM »
I let you know how it turns out.  I did try to moisten it a little bit.  I think the hydration was well below what it should have been because the dough was heavy and difficult to work with.  I may have to compensate for the fact that the bread machine gets warmer than room temp when mixing.
Thanks for the help. 
GMan

Offline Art

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Re: Using the lehmann dough calculator
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2009, 04:19:20 PM »
I have used a bread machine to make every single pizza dough (100's) since the "beginning". My Lehmann recipe (formula) for a 14" pie is the same one you show except for the yeast. My suggestion is to change to IDY (Fleischmann's Bread Machine Yeast) and add it to the bowl last (in a small well in the flour, away from the other ingredients).
Art

When baking, follow directions.  When cooking, go by your own taste.

Offline gfgman

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Re: Using the lehmann dough calculator (Update)
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2009, 07:38:54 PM »
So, the first ball of dough was a bust.  It was too dry.  I made a second ball and upped the water to 7 ounces.  I also upped the yeast to the full percentage.  It could stand to have a little more water, but it did stretch pretty nice and even, and it had a pretty good taste.  Another day in the fridge would add more taste.  A little more moist dough would probably make it more chewy. 
Now I just have to get some 6 in 1s or something else that I've used that is good.  I tried something from the store that was tomatoes only, and supposedly from Italy, but it was terrible.  A different taste then anything I've used before.  I threw it out and tried the only other thing I had on hand which was the Muir Glen fire roasted tomatoes.  Definitely something different, but probably a better base for soup then for pizza sauce. 

GMan