Author Topic: 2 stone or not  (Read 1226 times)

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Offline bonesbr549

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2 stone or not
« on: February 08, 2009, 12:25:01 AM »
Well, I'm a newbie here and stumbled across the site and have beed gobbling up the information now for hours.  Very interesting.  I have loved pizza my whole life and have finally got a crust that tastes ok, but the consistency has never been quite what I like.  I've deduced from the info here that I've never cooked it to the proper heat level.  Secondly, I use an old graniteware pan I've had for over 25years. I'm looking to go to a stone, and was wondering would two be better that one i.e. one above and one below? I'm also going to order the high gluten flour.  So much to learn.  Secondly, the sauce will be next.  Never have found that combination of things I liked. 


Offline Matthew

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Re: 2 stone or not
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2009, 07:02:22 AM »
Well, I'm a newbie here and stumbled across the site and have beed gobbling up the information now for hours.  Very interesting.  I have loved pizza my whole life and have finally got a crust that tastes ok, but the consistency has never been quite what I like.  I've deduced from the info here that I've never cooked it to the proper heat level.  Secondly, I use an old graniteware pan I've had for over 25years. I'm looking to go to a stone, and was wondering would two be better that one i.e. one above and one below? I'm also going to order the high gluten flour.  So much to learn.  Secondly, the sauce will be next.  Never have found that combination of things I liked. 

Welcome aboard, What type of pizza are you making?  I'm assuming since you are interested in hg flour, you are looking to do NY style?  For example, In my indoor oven, I usually do Neapolitan/NY style pizza.  I have a corderite shelf on the bottom & a Fibrament stone on the very top shelf.  I usually bake my pizza for about 3 minutes (stone temp approx 650 deg) & then finish it under the broiler for about a minute.  If your question is regarding what type of stone to purchase you'll see that most members would recommend Fibrament D or Corderite.  If you are looking at improving the taste of your dough, then I would definitely recommend using a starter.  Hope this helps.

Matt

Offline bonesbr549

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Re: 2 stone or not
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2009, 08:23:51 AM »
Welcome aboard, What type of pizza are you making?  I'm assuming since you are interested in hg flour, you are looking to do NY style?  For example, In my indoor oven, I usually do Neapolitan/NY style pizza.  I have a corderite shelf on the bottom & a Fibrament stone on the very top shelf.  I usually bake my pizza for about 3 minutes (stone temp approx 650 deg) & then finish it under the broiler for about a minute.  If your question is regarding what type of stone to purchase you'll see that most members would recommend Fibrament D or Corderite.  If you are looking at improving the taste of your dough, then I would definitely recommend using a starter.  Hope this helps.

Matt

I do like the NY style.   What is a starter, and how do you Start (sorry for the pun).  Secondly, your stone arangement.  Do you put the stone directly under the broiler with just enough clearance to slide the pie in, or further down. 

Offline Matthew

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Re: 2 stone or not
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2009, 12:03:34 PM »
I do like the NY style.   What is a starter, and how do you Start (sorry for the pun).  Secondly, your stone arangement.  Do you put the stone directly under the broiler with just enough clearance to slide the pie in, or further down. 

You can find quite a few posts on starters if you do an advanced search from the home page.  A starter is essentially a wild yeast also known as sourdough.  If you are courageous,  you can try to make one yourself, you may be successful you may not, there is really know way of knowing as alot rely's on the environment that it's exposed to.  It's a little complicated to explain so your best bet it to buy a book & read up on it.  I did what most members who use a sourdough starter did & that is to buy a proven culture & activate it.  Many people, including myself, purchased the cultures from www.sourdo.com.  Dr.Ed Wood's book, "Classic Sourdoughs" is very good & has alot of good information.  Some cultures come with activation instructions, so you don't have to get the book if you don't want to.  For pizza, the Italian cultures that he sells are amazing & you get 2 different ones.  Dr. Wood is also very good at responding to emails if you have any questions.

To answer your second question, I place my stone on the very to shelf just under the broiler.  My oven is equipped with an infrared radiation broiler, similar to that of a salamander, so the charring happen quite fast, so you have to keep a constant eye on it, it's not a good idea to walk away, usually takes about 45 seconds. 
« Last Edit: February 08, 2009, 12:08:38 PM by Matthew »


 

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