Author Topic: "Pourable" Pizza Dough  (Read 11179 times)

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Offline Pizzacrazy7

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"Pourable" Pizza Dough
« on: February 08, 2009, 03:03:29 PM »
After telling my Aunt about my recent pizza making adventures she said that when she used to be a school cook, they had a recipe for a "pourable" pizza dough that they would cook up, freeze what they didn't use, and top it and serve at a later time.  She said she really liked it and it had a real unique texture.  Well, I found it.  Personally, I can't imagine it's really that good since it's a school lunch pizza but I did find it quite fascinating.  So, heres's the link if anyone wants to check it out or even try it out if your feeling adventurous!  Let me know what you think of this craziness.

http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/nfsmi/Information/school_recipes/B-15.pdf
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2009, 04:47:09 PM »
Tony,

If you want to see what the Pourable Pizza Crust dough recipe looks like from a baker's percent standpoint, according to my calculations and the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, it is as follows, based on the 50 Servings numbers:

Pourable Pizza Crust Dough Formulation -- 50 Servings
All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (119.22%):
ADY (2.14285%):
Salt (0.43945%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.71642%):
Sugar (9.375%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (16.5179%):
Total (249.41162%):
1587.6 g  |  56 oz | 3.5 lbs
1892.74 g  |  66.76 oz | 4.17 lbs
34.02 g | 1.2 oz | 0.07 lbs | 9 tsp | 3 tbsp
6.98 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.25 tsp | 0.42 tbsp
27.25 g | 0.96 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6 tsp | 2 tbsp
148.84 g | 5.25 oz | 0.33 lbs | 12.44 tbsp | 0.78 cups
262.24 g | 9.25 oz | 0.58 lbs | 60.81 tbsp | 3.8 cups
3959.66 g | 139.67 oz | 8.73 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: For use with two 18" x 26" full sheet pans and one 13" x 18" half-sheet pan totalling 1170 sq. in. area; excludes cornmeal for sheet pans

As noted above, the two full sheet pans and one half-sheet pan have a total surface area of 1170 sq. in. For 139.67 ounces of dough, that means that the thickness factor is 139.67/1170 = 0.119376. With this number, you can use the expanded dough calculating tool to determine the amounts of ingredients needed to accommodate any size pan, rectagular/square and even round. For example, for the 8" x 8" square pan you mentioned in another thread, the required ingredients for that size pan are:

Pourable Pizza Crust Dough Formulation for 8" x 8" Pan (w/o Bowl Residue Compensation)
All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (119.22%):
ADY (2.14285%):
Salt (0.43945%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.71642%):
Sugar (9.375%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (16.5179%):
Total (249.41162%):
86.84 g  |  3.06 oz | 0.19 lbs
103.53 g  |  3.65 oz | 0.23 lbs
1.86 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.49 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
0.38 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.07 tsp | 0.02 tbsp
1.49 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.33 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
8.14 g | 0.29 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.04 tsp | 0.68 tbsp
14.34 g | 0.51 oz | 0.03 lbs | 9.98 tsp | 3.33 tbsp
216.6 g | 7.64 oz | 0.48 lbs | TF = 0.119376
Note: For 8" x 8" pan; excludes cornmeal for pan

If you want to use a bowl residue compensation for your stand mixer, say, 1.5%, the final dough formulation becomes:

Pourable Pizza Crust Dough Formulation for 8" x 8" Pan (With Bowl Residue Compensation)
All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (119.22%):
ADY (2.14285%):
Salt (0.43945%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.71642%):
Sugar (9.375%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (16.5179%):
Total (249.41162%):
88.15 g  |  3.11 oz | 0.19 lbs
105.09 g  |  3.71 oz | 0.23 lbs
1.89 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
0.39 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.07 tsp | 0.02 tbsp
1.51 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.33 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
8.26 g | 0.29 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.07 tsp | 0.69 tbsp
14.56 g | 0.51 oz | 0.03 lbs | 10.13 tsp | 3.38 tbsp
219.84 g | 7.75 oz | 0.48 lbs | TF = 0.1211666
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.119876; bowl residue compensation = 1.5%; excludes cornmeal for pan

Because of the small amount of "dough" involved, only 7.75 oz., you might find it easier to make it by hand. In that case, you can use a bowl residue compensation of 2.5% in the expanded dough calculating tool.

As the above dough formulations show, the "dough" is indeed wet, with a hydration of 119.22%. Also, with 9.375% sugar, the crust is likely to be quite sweet. The amount of salt is minuscule, just a bit more than 1/16 t. for your 8"-square pan application.
It is easy to make the "dough", so if you decide to try it, please let us know how it turns out. Maybe you can make it for your Aunt for Valentine's Day :chef:.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 19, 2009, 10:10:07 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline djones148

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2009, 07:21:37 PM »
Jim Lahey, the guy from Sullivan Street bakery who is famous for the No-Knead bread, uses a dough with extremely high hydration like this (his is 109%) for his potato pizza. He instructs people to use the paddle attachment on their mixers at pretty high speed for a whopping 20 minutes to develop the gluten.

Here's a discussion and pics of it http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5285/sullivan-street-potato-pizza




Offline Pizzacrazy7

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2009, 11:37:53 AM »
Peter,
      Now that it's scaled down to normal size I just might give it a go for the heck of it.  I better use up my other doughs that I've been wanting to try out first though.  I'll report progress of this goofy concept.  Great work with your calculations again Peter.
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Offline ericrx

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 04:24:14 PM »
Peter, Thanks so much and I plan to try this. How would the recipe be scaled for just one (half sheet) pan? Thanks, and I'll let you all know how it turns out.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 05:34:15 PM »
Peter, Thanks so much and I plan to try this. How would the recipe be scaled for just one (half sheet) pan? Thanks, and I'll let you all know how it turns out.

Here you go:

Pourable Pizza Crust Dough Formulation for a 13" x 18" Half-Sheet Pan (with 1.5% Bowl Residue Compensation)
Flour (100%):
Water (119.22%):
ADY (2.14285%):
Salt (0.43945%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.71642%):
Sugar (9.375%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (Carnation's) (16.5179%):
Total (249.41162%):
322.28 g  |  11.37 oz | 0.71 lbs
384.22 g  |  13.55 oz | 0.85 lbs
6.91 g | 0.24 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.83 tsp | 0.61 tbsp
1.42 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
5.53 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.22 tsp | 0.41 tbsp
30.21 g | 1.07 oz | 0.07 lbs | 7.58 tsp | 2.53 tbsp
53.23 g | 1.88 oz | 0.12 lbs | 12.34 tbsp | 0.77 cups
803.81 g | 28.35 oz | 1.77 lbs | TF = 0.1211666
Note: Nominal thickness factor = 0.119376; bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

I look forward to your results.

Peter

Offline ericrx

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 06:16:59 PM »
Wow!! COOL!  :chef: Peter that was fast, I just finished writing 8" x 8" version to Microsoft Word and was going to go ahead and make it. I clicked this tab in my taskbar so that I could add the source link to the file and saw your post. Thanks so much. I'm a newbie here and the post to which you replied was my first. What a great welcome and I will be sure to let you know how it turns out. I'm going to try it the first time exactly by the recipe and then a second time, minus the sugar, using my Ischia sourdough culture. Can't wait to try it and post the results and photos!!

Offline ericrx

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2009, 11:01:43 PM »
Ok, the results are in for the Pourable Pizza Dough Experiment, thanks to Pete's calculations. I am new to Pizza making so please remember that I am not trained in all the technical descriptions of crumb, texture, etc. The only thing I've learned so far is ANYTHING is better than frozen pizza, which I hated more and more the older I got, finally to the point of being determined to learn how make my own pizza. This began about 4 years ago, when I ordered the San Francisco Sourdough Culture from Ed Wood. While trying to learn how to work with it, I discovered Jeff Varasano's  legendary page. I was quite overwhelmed, as Ryan (codeninedesign) says on his blog. On his page Ryan says it took him months to get through the text. It took me about 4 years. A few months ago I was finally able to shrink all of the photos and reduce the font size into a MS Word document that was "printer friendly". I printed it, bound it, and I have been working on studying it, slow and steady and I'm almost ready to give it a try.

My first baking experience with pizza was with a source I felt I could trust, America's Test Kitchen (ATK). I saw their episode about Pepperoni Pan Pizza on PBS last summer and printed the recipe from their webpage. I gave it a try and could hardly believe how good it was, like I said, with only a history of frozen pizza to judge it against. Not only was it good, it was quite easy and turned out PERFECT! So, before I post my Pourable Pizza Dough Results I would like to post the recipe for the Pepperoni Pan Pizza from ATK because I used several of their methods in my Pourable Pizza Dough making.

=====================================================================================================

Pepperoni Pan Pizza
from the Episode: Pizza Party

Makes two 9-inch pizzas serving 4 to 6

Dough

½    cup olive oil 
¾    cup skim milk plus 2 additional tablespoons, warmed to 110 degrees
2   teaspoons sugar 
2 1/3   cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for counter
1   package  instant yeast 
½    teaspoon table salt 

Topping
1   (3.5-ounce) package sliced pepperoni 
1 1/3 cups tomato sauce  
3   cups shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese 

1. To make the dough: Adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 200 degrees. When oven reaches 200 degrees, turn it off. Lightly grease large bowl with cooking spray. Coat each of two 9-inch cake pans with 3 tablespoons oil.

2. Mix milk, sugar, and remaining 2 tablespoons (⅛ cup –er) oil in measuring cup. Mix flour, yeast, and salt in standing mixer fitted with dough hook. Turn machine to low and slowly add milk mixture. After dough comes together, increase speed to medium-low and mix until dough is shiny and smooth, about 5 minutes. Turn dough onto lightly floured counter, gently shape into ball, and place in greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and place in warm oven until doubled in size, about 30 minutes.

3. To shape and top the dough: Transfer dough to lightly floured counter, divide in half, and lightly roll each half into ball. Working with 1 dough ball at a time, roll and shape dough into 9 1/2-inch round and press into oiled pan. Cover with plastic wrap and set in warm spot (not in oven) until puffy and slightly risen, about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat oven to 400 degrees.

4. While dough rises, put half of pepperoni in single layer on microwave-safe plate lined with 2 paper towels. Cover with 2 more paper towels and microwave on high for 30 seconds. Discard towels and set pepperoni aside; repeat with new paper towels and remaining pepperoni.

5. Remove plastic wrap from dough. Ladle 2/3 cup sauce on each round, leaving 1/2-inch border around edges. Sprinkle each with 1 1/2 cups cheese and top with pepperoni. Bake until cheese is melted and pepperoni is browning around edges, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven; let pizzas rest in pans for 1 minute. Using spatula, transfer pizzas to cutting board and cut each into 8 wedges. Serve.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2009, 12:48:44 AM by ericrx »

Offline ericrx

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Pourable Pizza Dough - Using Weight
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2009, 12:28:25 AM »
Here is the recipe for the Pourable Pizza Dough, using Pete's calculations (see above) for a half-sheet pan along with the procedure (using conventional oven) from the USDA School Recipe:

======================================================================================================

POURABLE PIZZA CRUST
from USDA Recipes for Schools & PizzaMaking.com

Ingredients needed for crust: 

•   6.91 grams active dry yeast
•   322.28 grams  all-purpose flour 
•   53.23 grams dry non-fat milk
•   30.21 grams sugar   
•   1.42 grams salt
•   5.53 grams vegetable oil 
•   384.22 grams water 

For best results, have all ingredients and utensils at room temperature.

Adjust oven rack to lowest position and preheat oven to 475°. (moving rack to bottom is from America's Test Kitchen)

Lightly coat a half-sheet pan (13” x 18”) with cooking spray. Sprinkle each sheet pan with 2 tablespoons of cornmeal.

Mix yeast, flour, dry milk, sugar, and salt together.
 
Add oil to dry mixture & blend for 4 minutes on low speed.

Add water to dry ingredients. Blend for 10 minutes on medium speed. Batter will be lumpy.

Pour or spread batter into sheet pan. Let stand for 20 minutes.

Prebake for 10 minutes or until crust is set.

Remove pan from oven and top prebaked crust with desired toppings.
 
Return pan to oven and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes or until heated through and cheese is melted.

Remove pizza from oven and allow to cool for a few minutes. Portion by cutting pan 2 x 5 (10 pieces).


======================================================================================================

Eric's Notes:

1. I followed the ingredients and procedure to the letter. I was very nervous about doing this, my worst fears being that it would be a
dense, gummy, brick of flour that would require a chisel to remove from it from the pan. Because of those fears, instead of using cooking spray I used 4 tablespoons olive oil, following America's Test Kitchen's (ATK) procedure. I sprinkled the two tablespoons of cornmeal (I only had Maseca brand of masa harina and used it instead of cornmeal) using a strainer, shaking it lightly over the pan. My second fear was that it would taste as bad as I remember school pizza tasting. I'm very much an optimist though, and set my fears aside ready to be totally surprised by great results!

2. I preheated the oven and adjusted the rack to the lowest position. This wasn't in the school recipe but was part of the ATK recipe's procedure.

3. The procedure says "batter will be lumpy". It was! I made sure to carefully scrape the sides and bottom of the Kitchen Aid mixing bowl several times.

4. I mixed for 10 minutes and poured into the pan as instructed. I was so tempted to autolyse (following Jeff Varasano's method) after a brief minute or 2 of mixing, and after the 10 minutes of mixing, but I fought that tempation and stuck to the exact procedure as written.

5. During the 20 minute rest, I placed 24 pepperoni slices onto a double layer of paper towels, covered with a double layer of paper towels, and microwaved them for 30 seconds, again using the America's Test Kitchen procedure to reduce the grease from the pepperoni. I also removed the Pizza Sauce that I had made the night before and allowed it to come to room temperature (hours before starting the pizza).

5. Since the pre-bake is only 10 minutes, I sat in front of the oven, ready to be amazed, and I REALLY was!!! I'm from the South and watching the way it baked reminded me of the way cornbread batter poured into a cast-iron skillet bakes. It started puffing up and pulling away from the sides of the pan, I could also see it lifting from the bottom of the pan as it puffed.

6. I removed the pizza from the oven and sprayed it with Olive Oil Pam so it wouldn't get soggy from the pizza sauce. This wasn't part of the recipe but it seemed to really pay off later. There was one small break in the crust so I made sure to not put any sauce or cheese over this to prevent the crust from sticking to the pan. I used 2 cups Kraft part-skim shredded Mozzarella and 24 pieces pepperoni.

7. I put the pizza back into the oven and it was golden-brown-delicious in exactly 10 more minutes.

8. It looked PERFECT when it came out of the oven. I let it rest for a minute or so and then carefully lifted it out of the pan and
onto the marble tile to cut. The texture was perfect, small, normal size bubbles evenly distributed. The easiest way I know to describe the texture's appearance was that it looked very close to store-bought white sandwich bread. It had a nice chewiness, no dense, gummy parts AT ALL! That really surprised me. Flavor-wise, the only way I could think of to describe it would be a "homemade frozen pizza." Not a lot of flavor dough wise, like frozen pizza, but the texture was so much better than frozen pizza. Considering the ease in making it and the fact that it only took less than an hour to make, not a bad recipe at all. Without a Kitchen Aid or other stand mixer, it might be a little tough to go for 10 minutes, but further experiments will test if this recipe works with the longer ferment and no-knead method. The one thing that I didn't care for was the sweetness. It didn't bother me too much with the first piece or so, but by the third or fourth piece I was thinking "next time, no sugar."

So give it a try and let me know what you think. While I was weighing out the ingredients, I decided to pour them into volume measures and I will post a version of the recipe with the volumes in just a few minutes. Thanks again, Pete!!
« Last Edit: May 26, 2009, 02:30:18 PM by ericrx »

Offline ericrx

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"Pourable" Pizza Dough - Using Volume
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2009, 01:05:41 AM »



POURABLE PIZZA CRUST
from USDA Recipes for Schools & PizzaMaking.com

Ingredients needed for crust: 

•   2 ¼ teaspoons (1 packet) active dry yeast
•   2 ⅔ cups all-purpose flour 
•   ¾ cup dry non-fat milk
•   2 ½ tablespoons sugar   
•   ¼ teaspoon salt
•   1 ¼ teaspoons vegetable oil 
•   1 ⅔ cups water 

For best results, have all ingredients and utensils at room temperature.

Adjust oven rack to lowest position and preheat oven to 475°.

Lightly coat a half-sheet pan (13” x 18”) with cooking spray. Sprinkle each sheet pan with 2 tablespoons of cornmeal.

Mix yeast, flour, dry milk, sugar, and salt together.
 
Add oil to dry mixture & blend for 4 minutes on low speed.

Add water to dry ingredients. Blend for 10 minutes on medium speed. Batter will be lumpy.

Pour or spread batter into sheet pan. Let stand for 20 minutes.

Prebake for 10 minutes or until crust is set.

Remove pan from oven and top prebaked crust with desired topping.
 
Return pan to oven and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes or until heated through and cheese is melted.

Remove pizza from oven and allow to cool for a few minutes. Portion by cutting pan 2 x 5 (10 pieces).




Eric's Notes:

As I was making the pizza using weight measurements, I poured each ingredient into measuring containers in an effort to convert the wieght recipe to volumes. These are not perfect conversions. I did make the pizza a second time, though, using my volume conversions in order to test the volume recipe before posting, and again, it turned out perfect. What really surprises me the most with this pizza is that it tastes SO much better than I remember school pizza tasting!




Offline Pete-zza

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2009, 10:25:45 AM »
Eric,

I am glad to hear that things worked out well with the scaled down version of the original recipe. I was hoping that someone would give the recipe a try and post the results. I can see how over 9% sugar might be too much, making the pizza almost like a cake product with a high degree of tenderness in the finished crust and crumb. Leaving out the sugar altogether will produce a crust with a different texture and possibly color. If you decide to go this route, I would love to see and read about your results.

Peter

Offline piemaker2007

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2009, 12:00:33 PM »
Cooks Illustrated also had an interesting pourable pizza dough. I'll see if I can find my old issue.

PM

Offline carbon

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2009, 11:02:37 AM »
I followed this recipe last night and my pizza came out decent using my outdoor gas grill.
But one thing I was expecting was the dough to be really 'pourable', like batter.  Well, it wasn't and I ended up having to shape and work the dough to the edges of the pan.  The dough looked and felt like ordinary pizza dough.  Where did I go wrong?  BTW, I don't have a mixer so I mixed the dough using a large metal spoon.  Should I have increased hydration while mixing?
I would like to try this recipe again.

Thanks!!
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 11:06:31 AM by carbon »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2009, 01:57:22 PM »
carbon,

I'm not sure which pourable dough recipe you actually used but the dough recipe given in Reply 5 in this thread contains a large quantity of sugar (about 9.5%) and a large quantity of nonfat dry milk powder (about 16.5%). If you add the amounts of those two dry ingredients to the amount of flour, which is also dry, the "effective" hydration drops to around 95%. That number would represent a poolish-like preferment. As such, it would not "pour" like water but should still be quite wet. Unless you mismeasured something, or you used inaccurate volume measurements for the dry ingredients, I don't think you did anything wrong, even if you did not use a mixer.

Peter

Offline ericrx

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2009, 02:33:13 PM »
Carbon - Sorry you had problems with that second version. One of the first things I did before I started baking pizzas (which has only been recently) was to finally break down and buy a scale since everyone kept saying it was important in achieving the best results. The recipe worked out great by Pete's calculations, based on weight. The next time I make it I will measure the weighed amounts again, just to double-check them. If possible, try the weight version and see how it goes. It's funny you guys posted these two replies, because when I found them in my mail this morning I knew that meant it was time to start typing up a recipe I found, completely by accident, for another pourable pizza dough. I recently bought some Swans Down Cake Flour for a pound cake and was looking at their online free recipe booklets for download:

http://www.prestoflour.com/Portals/TheArtOfBaking/portal.aspx?tabid=29

In this list you will find a recipe booklet titled "Scatch Baking Made Simple". It contains a recipe for "No Roll Pizza Dough" (in pdf format). I just typed it up a few minutes ago for posting and it follows, below. I have not tried it yet. It does not say what size pizza pan to use so I'm not sure about that.

NO ROLL PIZZA DOUGH
from Swans Down “Scratch Baking Made Simple” Recipe Book

Ingredients needed:

•   2 ½ cups sifted Swans Down Cake Flour
•   1 teaspoon baking powder 
•   1 ½ teaspoon salt
•   ½ teaspoon oregano
•   ½ teaspoon pepper
•   1 cup milk
•   2 large eggs

Preheat oven to 425° F. Lightly grease and flour round pizza pan. Combine flour, baking powder, salt, oregano, and pepper, mix well. Stir in milk and eggs until smooth. Spread batter onto pizza pan and bake for 15-20 minutes. Remove from oven. Cover with your favorite toppings and bake an additional 15-18 minutes until crust is crisp and cheese is melted.

Topping Suggestions:

Traditional Pepperoni Pizza

Approx 25 pepperoni slices
½ cup pizza sauce
1 ½ cups grated mozzarella cheese

Zesty BBQ Chicken Pizza

1 ½ cups cubed chicken
½ cup BBQ sauce
¼ teaspoon cumin
¼ cup sliced yellow onion
1 ½ cups grated mozzarella cheese

Offline carbon

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2009, 03:12:48 PM »
Pete-zza and ericrx,

Thanks for your quick replies!  I used ericrx's second version using the volume measurements.  I guess I was expecting the dough to be more batter-like where it would quickly conform to the shape of the pan with very little handling.  That probably is not to be the case, I assume.
BTW, I used brown sugar instead since I did not have any regular sugar, if that mattered.

I will try the same recipe again this weekend but using a scale (digital postal scale I have for weighing cycling components from my weight weenie days).  I know, I should have just used the scale in the first place...:))

Thanks again!

Offline sallam

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2010, 09:42:46 PM »
That pourable dough is very interesting.
But I have a questions:
- how come there is no rising step in making the pourable dough? usually the dough has to be risen twice, but not in this dough. The only rising it calls for is a 20 minute proofing in trays.

I did follow the steps, but the cake came out flat with very little rising during baking. I expected that, because it didn't have enough time to rise at all before baking. How is it supposed to rise in 20 min?

(I've done a similar recipe before, but with a proper rising to double before pouring in trays, plus 30 min proofing in trays, and it came out much better.)

Offline sallam

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2010, 12:05:00 PM »
anyone please?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: "Pourable" Pizza Dough
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2010, 12:58:19 PM »
sallam,

I have not tried the recipe so I can only comment on the basis of looking at the baker's percents and the processing steps. Clearly, the recipe is a very unusual one, and I would guess that only one rise step is used in order to save time. Also, with a batter-like dough, there would not be much point to "punching" it down to permit a second rise, assuming this could even be done. What allows the dough to rise within 20 minutes is the combination of 130 degree F water and a very large amount of ADY, about 2.14%. Skipping the 20-minute rise is likely to produce a different outcome.

Peter


 

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