Author Topic: ny style and oil (y/n)  (Read 1172 times)

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Offline gfgman

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ny style and oil (y/n)
« on: February 09, 2009, 02:01:33 PM »
I'm a bit new around here and learning quite a bit that I didn't know.  I have been using sugar in my dough for quite some time, but I see that NY style dough does not use sugar.  I dropped oil from my recipe some time ago as I tried several different formulations and preferred the ones without oil. 
Here's the question.  If I make a dough without oil and put it in a sealed container in the fridge, is it still recommended to rub the surface with oil?  Ehen I watch someone pull out dough at a pizza shop, it appears to be fairly dry on the surface.  The last ball of dough I made didn't have any oil rubbed on it.  My plastic wrap over the top did have a hole in it, so that could explain the overly dry top of the dough.
Just trying to get handle on doing this right.  I do bake on a preheated stone at 500, so all is good there, and I like my sauce formuation if I can get a good tomato product to use. 

GMan


Offline tdeane

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Re: ny style and oil (y/n)
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2009, 02:23:35 PM »
I'm a bit new around here and learning quite a bit that I didn't know.  I have been using sugar in my dough for quite some time, but I see that NY style dough does not use sugar.  I dropped oil from my recipe some time ago as I tried several different formulations and preferred the ones without oil. 
Here's the question.  If I make a dough without oil and put it in a sealed container in the fridge, is it still recommended to rub the surface with oil?  Ehen I watch someone pull out dough at a pizza shop, it appears to be fairly dry on the surface.  The last ball of dough I made didn't have any oil rubbed on it.  My plastic wrap over the top did have a hole in it, so that could explain the overly dry top of the dough.
Just trying to get handle on doing this right.  I do bake on a preheated stone at 500, so all is good there, and I like my sauce formuation if I can get a good tomato product to use. 

GMan
There is no need to rub the surface with oil.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: ny style and oil (y/n)
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2009, 02:31:39 PM »
GMan,

Sugar is not an essential ingredient for the NY style dough. However, table sugar is sometimes used in the dough if the dough is to ferment for a long time and there is a likelihood that the yeast will run out of natural sugars that it uses as food.

The recommendation that is usually dispensed to professional pizza operators is to wipe the dough balls with oil (usually a basic salad oil). See, for example, the instructions given at http://www.pmq.com/tt2/recipe/view/id_151/title_New-York-Style-Pizza/. Even then, the oil at the surface of the dough balls can be absorbed into the dough during the period of fermentation and result in a somewhat dry outer surface. Some pizza operators actually take advantage of the dry tops of the dough balls by using the tops to form the bottoms of the skins. This apparently helps produce a crispier bottom crust. In my case, the container I usually use has a lid with a small hole in it (for release of pressure) so I coat the dough ball with oil to prevent the top of the dough ball from overly drying out.

Peter

EDIT (3/22/13): For the updated link to the PMQ recipe, see http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/index.php/name/New-York-Style-Pizza/record/57724/
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 09:12:19 AM by Pete-zza »


 

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