Author Topic: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!  (Read 936 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline waltertore

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1992
  • Location: granville ohio
    • The Smiling With Hope Bakery
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2015, 07:11:28 AM »
Cool old pictures Walter, and interesting info about the ovens. It's amazing how the quality of so many products have gone downhill despite (or because of?) all the advances in technology.

I don't know why the newer BP/Blodgett/Montague/Marsal ovens don't bake as well as the old ones.  Some have more BTU's and top/bottom lined stones but still produce uneven top/bottom and rim browning.  I have worked on newer ovens and if you go in a deck oven pizzeria today the odds are way high they will be rotating pies.   That adds a lot of labor and oven heat loss. Walter


Offline waltertore

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1992
  • Location: granville ohio
    • The Smiling With Hope Bakery
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2015, 07:12:40 AM »
I am just HUMBLED when I see slices of Walter's and Norma's pies. ........

Thanks Bob and your pies look darn good too :)  Norma's pies taste as good as they look.  Walter

Offline Pizza Shark

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 47
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2015, 01:23:26 PM »
Geeze folks... I never knew I'd be famous on Pizza Making for the cheap paper plate secret!  Glad I could contribute something.  I have a Costco close by my work apartment in PA where I can purchase a stack of either 500 or 750 I believe for $4-$5.  It is about a penny a plate.  I will say they are soooo cheap that one could probably fold the pizza and the plate as one and take a bite and not even know they were eating plate!  Those are the plates I do love though. 

Years ago when I worked for Pizzeria Regina in Boston (although now they've reversed it and call it Regina Pizzeria for some reason or another) I was quite cocky when it came to pizza making.  I mean, Pizzeria Regina was named Best of Boston for so many years and the award seemed to get bounced back and forth between Regina and Santarpio's for a while.  Anyway,  I can tell everyone here with absolute certainty (including myself now) that thanks to this forum and the work, experimentation and suggestions that all make far better pizzas than those pizzerias that may be awarded best of this city or that city. 

To be quite frank, someone like me has had to eat several slices of humble pie" as I've read many threads and incorporated the ideas and techniques others have used and those changes have escalated my pies to a level so far beyond Regina it isn't even funny.  If I were to return to Boston and take a bite of a Regina Pizza today I would most likely be highly disappointed.  I mean, Look at Norma's pizzas!  I have yet to taste a slice of her's and hope to make it to her market some day but Good Lord she cranks out a pie that looks absolutely exceptional as does Walter from Granville, Ohio (the town I grew up in if he can believe it or not) who does such great work in Newark, Essen and so many others here regardless of style be it NY, Detroit, Cracker, Chicago, Midwest/American, Sicilian, you name it and there are people here making pizzas that exceed anything that can commonly be purchased.

I need to get an accurate scale as I've always done everything by look/touch/feel and just what I know.  As such, I can't contribute in a way others can here (yet).  That will change when I find a scale that works for me.  Any ideas on a small inexpensive scale that is accurate enough?

I will also say that anyone in the South Eastern PA, Jersey, Northern DE area looking for premium commercial ingredients has to make the trip to Bova Foods in Chalfont, PA as I did recently.  How can you beat cases of 7/11 for $29 and Grande loafs (by the case only) for $2.79/lb and 50lb bags of GMFS for under $20 and they are all such nice people who have build a family owned pizza distribution empire in the tri-state area. 

Anyway,  I am rambling.  Best to all!       

Offline waltertore

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1992
  • Location: granville ohio
    • The Smiling With Hope Bakery
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #28 on: August 02, 2015, 03:26:45 PM »
Pizza Shark:  Thanks for the compliment and sharing your information/expertise.  We buy the paper plates by t he case from Sysco. I think it is $27 and has 12/100 plate packets.  The only thing is we have to separate each plate early in the day or you will end up using 5 plates for 1 :)  How small a scale are you needing weight wise?  People here have had a lot of success with scales and could tell you what one to get. If you are going big batches I can share what we use.  Walter

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3742
  • Location: SF Bay Area
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #29 on: August 02, 2015, 04:45:10 PM »
Geeze folks... I never knew I'd be famous on Pizza Making for the cheap paper plate secret!  Glad I could contribute something.  I have a Costco close by my work apartment in PA where I can purchase a stack of either 500 or 750 I believe for $4-$5.  It is about a penny a plate.  I will say they are soooo cheap that one could probably fold the pizza and the plate as one and take a bite and not even know they were eating plate!  Those are the plates I do love though. 

Years ago when I worked for Pizzeria Regina in Boston (although now they've reversed it and call it Regina Pizzeria for some reason or another) I was quite cocky when it came to pizza making.  I mean, Pizzeria Regina was named Best of Boston for so many years and the award seemed to get bounced back and forth between Regina and Santarpio's for a while.  Anyway,  I can tell everyone here with absolute certainty (including myself now) that thanks to this forum and the work, experimentation and suggestions that all make far better pizzas than those pizzerias that may be awarded best of this city or that city. 

To be quite frank, someone like me has had to eat several slices of humble pie" as I've read many threads and incorporated the ideas and techniques others have used and those changes have escalated my pies to a level so far beyond Regina it isn't even funny.  If I were to return to Boston and take a bite of a Regina Pizza today I would most likely be highly disappointed.  I mean, Look at Norma's pizzas!  I have yet to taste a slice of her's and hope to make it to her market some day but Good Lord she cranks out a pie that looks absolutely exceptional as does Walter from Granville, Ohio (the town I grew up in if he can believe it or not) who does such great work in Newark, Essen and so many others here regardless of style be it NY, Detroit, Cracker, Chicago, Midwest/American, Sicilian, you name it and there are people here making pizzas that exceed anything that can commonly be purchased.

I need to get an accurate scale as I've always done everything by look/touch/feel and just what I know.  As such, I can't contribute in a way others can here (yet).  That will change when I find a scale that works for me.  Any ideas on a small inexpensive scale that is accurate enough?

I will also say that anyone in the South Eastern PA, Jersey, Northern DE area looking for premium commercial ingredients has to make the trip to Bova Foods in Chalfont, PA as I did recently.  How can you beat cases of 7/11 for $29 and Grande loafs (by the case only) for $2.79/lb and 50lb bags of GMFS for under $20 and they are all such nice people who have build a family owned pizza distribution empire in the tri-state area. 

Anyway,  I am rambling.  Best to all!     

PS,

Thanks for the honorable mention.  ;D

As far as scales go, I highly recommend this one with the Baker's Percent function. Have had this scale for years now and it just works like a charm.

http://www.amazon.com/Kitchen-Scale-Bakers-KD8000-Weight/dp/B00VEKX35Y
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline Pizza Shark

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 47
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #30 on: August 02, 2015, 04:50:12 PM »
Thank you so much Essen!  If it works for you it will certainly work for me!  Ordering! 

Offline hotsawce

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 688
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2015, 02:01:02 PM »
All I'm going to say is look at the cheese melt on Joe's/Wburg pizza and the other pies posted. The melt on the former is ideal; they become cohesive with the sauce. Pockmarked, not browned. A number of the later have begun to bubble too much and turn brown. There is a very fine line and it's what separates the best from the rest, IMO.

I've timed both bakes ranging from 4.5 to 6 minutes on occasions I've been.

Please, just compare the slices from Joe's/Wburg...the cheese melt etc to the pictures here http://www.smilingwithhopepizza.com/gallery/
The cheese on the latter is overbrowned and bubbled, and sits on top of rather than melts into the sauce....these are very different things

Some people are anal about neapolitan pizza; NY style can be just as intricate and in this case it is
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 02:11:07 PM by hotsawce »

Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 84
  • Location: California
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #32 on: Yesterday at 12:05:42 AM »
All I'm going to say is look at the cheese melt on Joe's/Wburg pizza and the other pies posted. The melt on the former is ideal; they become cohesive with the sauce. Pockmarked, not browned. A number of the later have begun to bubble too much and turn brown. There is a very fine line and it's what separates the best from the rest, IMO.

I've timed both bakes ranging from 4.5 to 6 minutes on occasions I've been.

Please, just compare the slices from Joe's/Wburg...the cheese melt etc to the pictures here http://www.smilingwithhopepizza.com/gallery/
The cheese on the latter is overbrowned and bubbled, and sits on top of rather than melts into the sauce....these are very different things

Some people are anal about neapolitan pizza; NY style can be just as intricate and in this case it is

All fair points to me.

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3742
  • Location: SF Bay Area
Re: NYC Street on the Grill Getting there!
« Reply #33 on: Yesterday at 12:23:33 AM »
All I'm going to say is look at the cheese melt on Joe's/Wburg pizza and the other pies posted. The melt on the former is ideal; they become cohesive with the sauce. Pockmarked, not browned. A number of the later have begun to bubble too much and turn brown. There is a very fine line and it's what separates the best from the rest, IMO.

I've timed both bakes ranging from 4.5 to 6 minutes on occasions I've been.

Please, just compare the slices from Joe's/Wburg...the cheese melt etc to the pictures here http://www.smilingwithhopepizza.com/gallery/
The cheese on the latter is overbrowned and bubbled, and sits on top of rather than melts into the sauce....these are very different things

Some people are anal about neapolitan pizza; NY style can be just as intricate and in this case it is

No offense, Hotsawce, but unless you know which cheese brand is being used by those places you mentioned, this post is useless since every cheese melts in different ways under different conditions.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein


 

pizzapan