Author Topic: Essen1's NY-style pizza project  (Read 127845 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2009, 05:42:17 PM »
Terry,

Thanks much for the info. I'll give your suggestion a shot and will report back.


Dbgtr,

The dough's fairly moist but not overly wet to a point where you can't handle it. I had no problems managing the dough with the 1% increase in hydration. Maybe add a bit more flour to it.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein


Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2009, 10:14:48 AM »
Just wanted to chime in and say Mike makes some Bad-A$$ looking ~NY pies~ !

"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2009, 04:28:14 PM »
Since I had a few days off over the Holiday weekend I took heed of Terry's suggestion to use an individual dough ball weight of 370 gr. for a 14" pie. I also kept the hydration at 64%, in line with Peter's suggestion a couple of weeks back.

I did a 24 hr cold rise, took the dough out of the fridge and balled it up right away and let the dough balls come up to room temp in my wooden proof box. The dough was very easy to handle and shape into skins. I made three pies, one was a Frutti di mare that my old man requested and had clams, tuna, shrimps and calamari on it, the next one was a plain cheese per the request by a neighbor and the one below (pics) was for myself, a mild Italian sausage one. I also put the mozzarella on first and then the sauce.

Here's the formula:

764 gr. KABF (100%)
489 gr. Water (64%)
14 gr. Sea salt (1.8%)
15 gr. organic sugar (2%)
8 gr. EVOO (1%)
2 gr. IDY (.3%)

Bake at 600° F for 7 minutes with one under the broiler for some additional color. Unfortunately I didn't get to take a pic of the bottom of the crust. The kneading procedure was the same as I describe in one of my earlier posts above and was based on Evelyne Slomon's advice, given on the PMQ forum.

Mike

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Offline JConk007

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2009, 05:27:04 PM »
Mike,
I am lovin the looks of #3 Like the way the cheese went first fresh mozz right?
Nicely done!
John
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Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2009, 07:45:10 PM »
I also put the mozzarella on first and then the sauce.

I put the cheese down first and then the sauce, which also worked out well to protect the cheese from breaking down. I realize that that is not a NY style treatment. I believe it is more NJ style, which you may not want to dignify as a former New Yorker by adopting that style.

Dear Mike,

TRAITOR! Calling your 'Jersey pie' N.Y., HA!

Just kiddin', and these pies look better and better all the time.  ;D

Organic sugar eh? Iiiinteresting.
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2009, 10:34:35 PM »
NYP,

Totonno's in NYC does it that way and I have found that it is actually a good way to eliminate that "gum line", the thin layer of undercooked or soggy dough right underneath the toppings.

The oil in the cheese does prevent the sauce and additional liquid from the toppings to seep deeper into the dough, which results in a crispier crust. But that's just my observation. Others might feel different about it.

But so far, I like it and it works for me.


John,

it was whole-milk, low-moisture mozzarella. I'll use fresh mozza when I fire up my LBE again.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2009, 10:36:08 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2009, 03:27:13 PM »
Alright...

My folks have some family visiting from out of state and they're both pizza aficionados. My old man's wife's sister - and herself - grew up with Chicago Thin Crust and deep-dish pies but also have a deep love for a good NY-style pie. And the sister's boyfriend admitted to me that he enjoys a good pizza about twice a week from a place in his town that's run by an older Italian lady and sports a WFO. He said that her pies always have a nice char to it, are thin crust and overall some of the best pizza he's has so far.

Anyway, I thought I'd use the family as guinea pigs for a same-day 8 hr dough. I started at 11:00 am and had the first pizza on their table at around 7:00 pm, right on time for the Sharks - Ducks Hockey game. The ladies requested a greek-style pizza, which was topped with fresh red bellers, red onion, fresh garlic, Feta cheese, Kalamata Olives, marinated artichoke hearts and a generous dusting of oregano.

The second pie was a half & half per request by my old man and the sister's BF. It featured mushrooms, fresh garlic Kalamata olives on the entire pizza and then one half was topped with mild Italian sausage & Calabrese salami, and the other half was a tuna, red onion type.

Unfortunately, I didn't take any individual pics of both pizzas but managed to record two videos, capturing the remarks of what the family thought of those pies. I apologize for the lighting but it was taken with my digital cam and the quality lacked a little. But I'm sure you can hear their comments... :chef:


Here are the two vids:





Don't mind my yapping in the background!  ;D


And here's the formula I used:

802 gr. KABF (100%)
514 gr. Warm water - 95° F (64%)
16 gr. Kosher salt (2%)
12 gr. Organic sugar (1.5%)
12 gr. Garlic-flavored olive oil (1.5%)
4 gr. IDY (.5%)

Single ball: 340 gr. / 14" / Thin crust


I dissolved the sugar in the water first with a whisk then added 75% of the flour and IDY. Using the paddle I mixed it until I had a thick, batter-like consistency. I covered the bowl with a damp tea towel for an hour and then added the rest of the flour, the salt and the oil. I used garlic-infused oil because it adds a bit to the flavor of the crust and since it wasn't a longer cold-rise over a few days time, it's a great alternative imho.

After everything was incorporated, I kneaded the dough for 10 mins on Speed 2 and let it rest again for 30 mins, then another knead for 5 mins, balled it up and in the fridge it went for about two hours. After that time, I took it out, immediately divided it into four balls and proofed them in my wooden proof box for the remainder of the time.
I kept the proof box in the fridge for approx. another 90 mins before I let them come up too room temp.

I preheated my oven for about an hour before the first pizza went in. The crust was very light and airy but had a nice crunch and chew to it. It had some nice coloring, a little char here and there and it yielded great oven spring. Bake time was 7 mins for the first one and 9 mins for the second. Overall, I think it was a good same-day dough.

« Last Edit: April 20, 2009, 08:12:56 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2009, 03:43:40 PM »
Mike, yep, hockey on TV alright. It looks like they loved it man, well done.  ;D

Sushi, the dog, reminds me of a Nick Drake song.

Anyway, nice post! :chef:

"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2009, 04:31:42 PM »
J,

I think Mike dubbed all of the voices, other than his own, from German to English.

Peter


Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #34 on: April 20, 2009, 05:20:34 PM »
J,

I think Mike dubbed all of the voices, other than his own, from German to English.

Peter

 ;D Good one! Yes, I think he had to. If you listen closely you suddenly hear "dieses schmeckt schrecklich" but then some American voice comes in over it saying how fresh it is.
 ;D
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #35 on: April 20, 2009, 06:08:06 PM »
J,

I think Mike dubbed all of the voices, other than his own, from German to English.

Peter

Ah jeez....was it that obvious? Damn.

But I think I got that Northern Mich./Canada/Northern Wisc. area accent right, eh?  ;D


Quote
If you listen closely you suddenly hear "dieses schmeckt schrecklich" but then some American voice comes in over it saying how fresh it is.

Jim,

You're right. The pies were absolutely atrocious. Completely inedible and brackish. I had to pay them big bucks for them to force those couple of pizzas down their respective throats!   :angel:

Mike

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Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #36 on: April 20, 2009, 06:52:28 PM »
J,

I think Mike dubbed all of the voices, other than his own, from German to English.

Peter

See what you started, Peter?  Ain't it great?



Ah jeez....was it that obvious? Damn.

But I think I got that Northern Mich./Canada/Northern Wisc. area accent right, eh?  ;D


Jim,

You're right. The pies were absolutely atrocious. Completely inedible and brackish. I had to pay them big bucks for them to force those couple of pizzas down their respective throats!   :angel:



And even BIGGER bucks to say something nice??

Seriously, thanks for a couple of great vids, Mike, and the chance for a good chuckle!  A smile a day keeps the doctor away!  It's always nice to see ppl truly enjoying the pizza that someone else made for them...  of course, what are they GOING to say with you standing right there, camera in hand??   ;)   ;)   >:D

~sd
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Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #37 on: April 20, 2009, 07:02:41 PM »
of course, what are they GOING to say with you standing right there, camera in hand??   ;)   ;)   >:D

~sd

 :-D
saying...

"So whadaya think, ya like it right!? What's better my pizza or Domino's? Cool, OK mine or Godfather's, remember them, yeah a lot of them closed, I'm still here, so mine's way better right? If you could eat my pizza or a 3 pound  Maine lobster which would you want? If God came down and said ''You can come to heaven now but you have to stop eating the pizza and leave this very second'' you'd stay right?..."

Juuust kiddin' Mike.  :D
« Last Edit: April 20, 2009, 07:07:14 PM by NY pizzastriver »
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #38 on: April 20, 2009, 08:12:29 PM »
Quote
If God came down and said ''You can come to heaven now but you have to stop eating the pizza and leave this very second'' you'd stay right?..."

LOL!

I know the folks are in their respected late 50s to early 60s but do they look that old??  ???

Well, I know they're family, and family always tends to be more forgiving than anyone else, but I always ask them to be brutally honest and usually they are. And if they are, it's always some sort of constructive criticism, but I think in my early days of pizza making I'm sure there were several occasions where they thought "God, this one sucks! Do I really have to eat that??" But it's gotten better albeit gradually.  :chef:

Mike

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Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #39 on: April 21, 2009, 07:21:31 AM »


I know the folks are in their respected late 50s to early 60s but do they look that old??  ???

No man, it had nothing to do with ages. I believe if they were 30 you'd still state that your pizza is better than going to heaven.
 :angel:
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #40 on: April 21, 2009, 02:33:14 PM »
No man, it had nothing to do with ages. I believe if they were 30 you'd still state that your pizza is better than going to heaven.
 :angel:

Of course I would because they are...the pies that is.  ;D
Mike

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Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2009, 03:19:55 PM »
I know it bro!  :D
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1


Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2009, 08:18:35 PM »
Peter,

Remember when I raved about Marcello's in SF? Well, I said I'd post some picks of their individual slices and here are a few from one of my earlier lunches at their place.

In the second pick, you can see those nice air pockets which give the crust their characteristics. Very light, fluffy and foldable with a good amount of char on the bottom, from the Rotoflex oven.

Pics are not the best because I took them with my cell phone cam.

Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #43 on: April 26, 2009, 03:35:49 PM »
Peter,

I used your suggestion concerning the missing parts of the recipe I pm'ed you about and came up with this formula:

662 gr. Stone-Buhr flour (100%)
417 gr. Water @ 75° F (63%)
12 gr. Kosher salt        (1.75%)
4.5 gr. IDY                    (0.65%)

and a baker's pinch of sugar.

Single ball was 365 and TF was 0.08.

I did get some air pockets but not as much as the Marcello crust. And it wasn't as soft. It still was a good dough, though, and I think if I'd add a touch of oil and increase the hydration to 64%, I should be able to nail it at some point. However, the bottom of the crust lacked some of the charring albeit a stone pre-heating time of over an hour.

I also put on the cheese first and instead of using shredded cheese, I used sliced whole-milk, low moisture mozzarella and gave it a little bit of a Totonno's look, minus the charred rim.

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline RichC

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #44 on: May 05, 2009, 01:24:58 PM »
Alright...

My folks have some family visiting from out of state and they're both pizza aficionados. My old man's wife's sister - and herself - grew up with Chicago Thin Crust and deep-dish pies but also have a deep love for a good NY-style pie. And the sister's boyfriend admitted to me that he enjoys a good pizza about twice a week from a place in his town that's run by an older Italian lady and sports a WFO. He said that her pies always have a nice char to it, are thin crust and overall some of the best pizza he's has so far.

Anyway, I thought I'd use the family as guinea pigs for a same-day 8 hr dough. I started at 11:00 am and had the first pizza on their table at around 7:00 pm, right on time for the Sharks - Ducks Hockey game. The ladies requested a greek-style pizza, which was topped with fresh red bellers, red onion, fresh garlic, Feta cheese, Kalamata Olives, marinated artichoke hearts and a generous dusting of oregano.

The second pie was a half & half per request by my old man and the sister's BF. It featured mushrooms, fresh garlic Kalamata olives on the entire pizza and then one half was topped with mild Italian sausage & Calabrese salami, and the other half was a tuna, red onion type.

Unfortunately, I didn't take any individual pics of both pizzas but managed to record two videos, capturing the remarks of what the family thought of those pies. I apologize for the lighting but it was taken with my digital cam and the quality lacked a little. But I'm sure you can hear their comments... :chef:


Here are the two vids:





Don't mind my yapping in the background!  ;D


And here's the formula I used:

802 gr. KABF (100%)
514 gr. Warm water - 95° F (64%)
16 gr. Kosher salt (2%)
12 gr. Organic sugar (1.5%)
12 gr. Garlic-flavored olive oil (1.5%)
4 gr. IDY (.5%)

Single ball: 340 gr. / 14" / Thin crust


I dissolved the sugar in the water first with a whisk then added 75% of the flour and IDY. Using the paddle I mixed it until I had a thick, batter-like consistency. I covered the bowl with a damp tea towel for an hour and then added the rest of the flour, the salt and the oil. I used garlic-infused oil because it adds a bit to the flavor of the crust and since it wasn't a longer cold-rise over a few days time, it's a great alternative imho.

After everything was incorporated, I kneaded the dough for 10 mins on Speed 2 and let it rest again for 30 mins, then another knead for 5 mins, balled it up and in the fridge it went for about two hours. After that time, I took it out, immediately divided it into four balls and proofed them in my wooden proof box for the remainder of the time.
I kept the proof box in the fridge for approx. another 90 mins before I let them come up too room temp.

I preheated my oven for about an hour before the first pizza went in. The crust was very light and airy but had a nice crunch and chew to it. It had some nice coloring, a little char here and there and it yielded great oven spring. Bake time was 7 mins for the first one and 9 mins for the second. Overall, I think it was a good same-day dough.



I used this recipe (percentages ran through the dough calculator) this past weekend to make four (4) 12" inch pies.  Started mixing the dough at 9am, used mostly the same technique describe above.  It went into the fridge at 10:40am.  Out of the Fridge at 2:40pm, and into my oven (set at the lowest temp I could achieve without it being off (~110dgf, measured with my themapen) for proofing for 2.5 hours.  I made all four pies (starting at 5:45pm), the first one being dressed with Escalon 6in1's right out of the can, and local Mozzarella (Fiero's), and some onions and sweet peppers.  The other three (3) were Margherita Style, with Costco fresh Mozzarella ($3.79/#), Campari tomatoes from Costco, and some fresh Basil.  Lots of cracked black pepper and drizzled extra virgin Olive Oil after the pies exited the oven. 

The overall consensus was this was an outstanding pie (specifically the dough and fresh mozzarella).  I really wasn't able to taste any of the sugar (I did not use the organic sugar, straight granular white sugar) which made me very happy.  The dough stretched, but had some elasticity as well, so it was a bit more work getting these to ~12" pies.  Overall, I would use this dough again without hesitation!  The oven was preheated for 45 minutes with 1/2" tiles at 450dgf.  The pies went straight from peel to stones for 10 minutes.  Not burning/charring on the bottom, but the upper crust was a bit pale.  Sorry no pictures, I promise to have them for my next attempts, sometime this coming weekend.  Thanks again Essen1.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2009, 01:28:50 PM by RichC »

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #45 on: May 05, 2009, 03:33:28 PM »
I used this recipe (percentages ran through the dough calculator) this past weekend to make four (4) 12" inch pies.  Started mixing the dough at 9am, used mostly the same technique describe above.  It went into the fridge at 10:40am.  Out of the Fridge at 2:40pm, and into my oven (set at the lowest temp I could achieve without it being off (~110dgf, measured with my themapen) for proofing for 2.5 hours.  I made all four pies (starting at 5:45pm), the first one being dressed with Escalon 6in1's right out of the can, and local Mozzarella (Fiero's), and some onions and sweet peppers.  The other three (3) were Margherita Style, with Costco fresh Mozzarella ($3.79/#), Campari tomatoes from Costco, and some fresh Basil.  Lots of cracked black pepper and drizzled extra virgin Olive Oil after the pies exited the oven. 

The overall consensus was this was an outstanding pie (specifically the dough and fresh mozzarella).  I really wasn't able to taste any of the sugar (I did not use the organic sugar, straight granular white sugar) which made me very happy.  The dough stretched, but had some elasticity as well, so it was a bit more work getting these to ~12" pies.  Overall, I would use this dough again without hesitation!  The oven was preheated for 45 minutes with 1/2" tiles at 450dgf.  The pies went straight from peel to stones for 10 minutes.  Not burning/charring on the bottom, but the upper crust was a bit pale.  Sorry no pictures, I promise to have them for my next attempts, sometime this coming weekend.  Thanks again Essen1.

Rich,

Glad you liked the dough.  :chef:

In regards to the coloring, I always finish the pie under the broiler for maybe a minute or so, to give the crust some additional browning.

EDIT: I also forgot to mention that I always pre-heat the oven at 550° F for an hour, with the stone on the lowest rack and the bake time is around 7-8 mins.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2009, 04:32:22 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

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Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #46 on: May 07, 2009, 04:37:39 PM »
Just as I “hounded” Jim to try JerryMac’s recipe, Mike has been “kindly suggesting on a regular basis"  :-D   >:D  that I try his Marcello’s clone… so here are the results...

I used Stone Buhr bread flour and in place of the garlic oil that Mike suggests, I used EVOO with the tiniest pinch of granulated garlic.  I couldn’t taste the garlic in the crust per se, but I really think it added a certain “je ne sais quoi” to the flavor of the crust.  The sauce was Pomi crushed tomatoes (rather flavorless IMHO) to which I added minced fresh garlic, black pepper, salt, dried homegrown Greek oregano, freshly ground fennel seed and dried basil.

The pizzas were scaled to 12”, but I had a little trouble opening them up that far, so the first couple ended up as about 9” pizzas instead.  Next time, I will let the dough warm up a little longer since I noticed that each pizza was a little easier to stretch.  I baked the first pizza and let the stone recover its heat while we ate… so there was about 10 or more minutes between each bake.

I preheated the oven to 550oF, with the 35o boost, for about 1.5 hours.  Bottom stone temp when I slid the first pizza in was 635o with the upper stone at 600o.  When I slid the pizza in, I set the timer for 5 minutes, but the first pizza was done in about 4.5 minutes.

I topped the first pizza with my usual pepperoni, diced yellow onion and green pepper, sliced black olives and fresh mushrooms.  The cheese was Polly-O whole milk mozz and a little smoked provolone.

The second pizza was prosciutto and fresh mushrooms (DH’s personal favorite) with the same cheeses.

Third pizza was just sauce and cheese.  By the time I baked this one, the stones were even hotter and I didn’t pull the pizza out in time.  The crust was a little hard in spots and the cheese broke down a little.  Still quite edible, though!

I baked a fourth pizza with all the leftover toppings since the recipe makes four seven-ounce balls.  That pizza went straight into the fridge for my breakfast!
 
These pizzas were VERY tasty and as you can see from the slice side view, the oven spring was quite nice.  The dough was still quite cold to the touch when I stretched it, as per Mike’s instructions which probably helped the spring a bit.  Had we not been starving, I would have let the 9” crusts relax a little so I could stretch them further.  As it was, the finished crusts were very crisp on the outside and moist and chewy on the inside… they were WONDERFUL!  DH ate every bite of every slice… which is high praise!

Thanks for a great recipe, Mike... I will be making it again soon!

~mots aka sd
« Last Edit: May 07, 2009, 04:40:39 PM by sourdough girl »
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #47 on: May 07, 2009, 08:01:16 PM »
Mike,

When you buy pizzas from Marcello's, do you buy only by the slice or do you also buy full pizzas and, if so, are there differences in the slices?

Also, do you know if Marcello's bakes/re-heats pizza on a metal surface or a stone surface?

A Yelp poster, Lindsay, at http://www.yelp.com/biz/marcellos-pizza-san-francisco?rpp=40&sort_by=relevance_desc&start=80, apparently was able to buy dough from Marcello's. Is that a possible option for you to get a better feel for the Marcello's dough and possibly an opportunity to ask questions to get more information on their dough?

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #48 on: May 07, 2009, 11:05:55 PM »
Just as I “hounded” Jim to try JerryMac’s recipe, Mike has been “kindly suggesting on a regular basis"  :-D   >:D  that I try his Marcello’s clone… so here are the results...

I used Stone Buhr bread flour and in place of the garlic oil that Mike suggests, I used EVOO with the tiniest pinch of granulated garlic.  I couldn’t taste the garlic in the crust per se, but I really think it added a certain “je ne sais quoi” to the flavor of the crust.  The sauce was Pomi crushed tomatoes (rather flavorless IMHO) to which I added minced fresh garlic, black pepper, salt, dried homegrown Greek oregano, freshly ground fennel seed and dried basil.

The pizzas were scaled to 12”, but I had a little trouble opening them up that far, so the first couple ended up as about 9” pizzas instead.  Next time, I will let the dough warm up a little longer since I noticed that each pizza was a little easier to stretch.  I baked the first pizza and let the stone recover its heat while we ate… so there was about 10 or more minutes between each bake.

I preheated the oven to 550oF, with the 35o boost, for about 1.5 hours.  Bottom stone temp when I slid the first pizza in was 635o with the upper stone at 600o.  When I slid the pizza in, I set the timer for 5 minutes, but the first pizza was done in about 4.5 minutes.

I topped the first pizza with my usual pepperoni, diced yellow onion and green pepper, sliced black olives and fresh mushrooms.  The cheese was Polly-O whole milk mozz and a little smoked provolone.

The second pizza was prosciutto and fresh mushrooms (DH’s personal favorite) with the same cheeses.

Third pizza was just sauce and cheese.  By the time I baked this one, the stones were even hotter and I didn’t pull the pizza out in time.  The crust was a little hard in spots and the cheese broke down a little.  Still quite edible, though!

I baked a fourth pizza with all the leftover toppings since the recipe makes four seven-ounce balls.  That pizza went straight into the fridge for my breakfast!
 
These pizzas were VERY tasty and as you can see from the slice side view, the oven spring was quite nice.  The dough was still quite cold to the touch when I stretched it, as per Mike’s instructions which probably helped the spring a bit.  Had we not been starving, I would have let the 9” crusts relax a little so I could stretch them further.  As it was, the finished crusts were very crisp on the outside and moist and chewy on the inside… they were WONDERFUL!  DH ate every bite of every slice… which is high praise!

Thanks for a great recipe, Mike... I will be making it again soon!

~mots aka sd

Mots,

I'm very happy that you finally got around to trying the dough formula. But more important is the fact that you and DH liked it! The pics looks fantastic, especially the 'slice' photo. Great job!

In regards to the skins being a bit difficult to open up, well, like you suggested I'd let them just warm up a bit longer if you decide to make the dough again. But I don't know if you can call it a "Marcello's" clone just yet. I still am in the process of doing more research on it, but the light and bubbly crust is definitely a start.


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Mike,

When you buy pizzas from Marcello's, do you buy only by the slice or do you also buy full pizzas and, if so, are there differences in the slices?

Also, do you know if Marcello's bakes/re-heats pizza on a metal surface or a stone surface?

A Yelp poster, Lindsay, at http://www.yelp.com/biz/marcellos-pizza-san-francisco?rpp=40&sort_by=relevance_desc&start=80, apparently was able to buy dough from Marcello's. Is that a possible option for you to get a better feel for the Marcello's dough and possibly an opportunity to ask questions to get more information on their dough?

Peter

Peter,

So far I only had the slices but they were just fresh out of the oven. They also make a great Sicilian-style pie from the same crust. The last time I visited for lunch, I took a look at their oven (Rotoflex) and I believe the baking surface is metal.

I have not yet had the opportunity to try a whole pie from them but I did some work for them and received, in addition to their payment, two gift cards for a free pie of any style. So, tomorrow I'll be using one of the gift cards for lunch. Can't wait, actually.  ;D

I didn't know that they also sell their dough and give instructions on how to prepare and bake it. I'm sure it is an option for me, now that I know.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2009, 11:07:41 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #49 on: May 09, 2009, 03:05:08 PM »
Peter,

I went and picked up a pie yesterday from Marcello’s for lunch.

I did ask them if they sell dough to the public and they do. The owner told me that they sell dough for different sized pizzas. I didn’t buy one, however, because I had no way of storing it until I got home from work. I will pick one up perhaps after work one day next week and see if I can dissect it a little.

In regards to the oven, yes, they actually do bake on the metal surface rather than stone, because according to the owner the stones crack too often and the metal has a life expectancy of about 25 years.

Below are some pics from the pie itself. The crust was great and just like I have described before...light, airy, chewy with nice crunch. I couldn’t eat the entire pizza, obviously, but when I had a cold slice later on, the crust was what I would describe as ‘spongy’ for the lack of a better word. I also believe it has a good amount of sugar in it, but I could be wrong on that. I do think, though, that it is a high-hydration dough. Also, the charring on the underside added a nice touch to the taste, without being overpowering.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein


 

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