Author Topic: Jets pizza  (Read 71025 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #20 on: November 07, 2010, 09:26:21 PM »
boboo,

I have made a few phone calls and am awaiting responses. I will let you know what I learn.

Peter


Offline pizza king millinium

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2010, 12:24:05 AM »
I have worked at Jet's for 20 years, I know everything there is to know about the business.

Offline boboo

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #22 on: November 23, 2010, 04:01:05 PM »
Hey to Pizza King Millenium.  Just now saw your message.  Thanks for response.

My family loves the square deep dish pizza of Jets.
I can't afford as many as we'd like so I would like to make them myself to fill in the gap. We will still get the Jets often and recommend them etc. as much as possible We just need more of them in between.

I'm close and my crust looks just like Jets fried bottom crust, but its not as hard and crunchy. Mine kind of crumbles when you bite it so its softer and the center bottom is not crunchy at all.  I am also not getting as much chewy doughy top and middle layers; but perhaps I can work on that later.

Can you tell me exactly what Jets does to get this harder fried crunch on the entire bottom; what necessary ingredients, type of dough, equip, how they make it in detail, etc.? Will I have to have their types of commercial equipment, pans, and supplies etc.? If so, what and where to get them?


I am using bread flour, putting it in pan to let it rise for few hours. Then push the middle down and add toppings and bake it on 500 deg. for about 8 to 9 min.

Ordered high gluten flour to try next.

What is the secret and/or method to their consistent hard fried crunch on the bottom? 

Thanks
Bob

Offline pizza king millinium

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #23 on: November 24, 2010, 11:13:04 AM »
Hey to Pizza King Millenium.  Just now saw your message.  Thanks for response.

My family loves the square deep dish pizza of Jets.
I can't afford as many as we'd like so I would like to make them myself to fill in the gap. We will still get the Jets often and recommend them etc. as much as possible We just need more of them in between.

I'm close and my crust looks just like Jets fried bottom crust, but its not as hard and crunchy. Mine kind of crumbles when you bite it so its softer and the center bottom is not crunchy at all.  I am also not getting as much chewy doughy top and middle layers; but perhaps I can work on that later.

Can you tell me exactly what Jets does to get this harder fried crunch on the entire bottom; what necessary ingredients, type of dough, equip, how they make it in detail, etc.? Will I have to have their types of commercial equipment, pans, and supplies etc.? If so, what and where to get them?


I am using bread flour, putting it in pan to let it rise for few hours. Then push the middle down and add toppings and bake it on 500 deg. for about 8 to 9 min.

Ordered high gluten flour to try next.

What is the secret and/or method to their consistent hard fried crunch on the bottom? 

Thanks
Bob

Its a top secret procedure! Your almost there though, a little tweeking, if you want the true way, it will cost you $1000000.00, LOL

Offline boboo

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #24 on: November 24, 2010, 02:37:02 PM »
You want $1,000,000.00 for the "secret". I can buy the whole franchise for $20,000.00; or hire a test kitchen for much less.  Are you under legal obligation not to disclose?  How close am I? What direction do I need to go in? ANYTHING!

Bob

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #25 on: November 24, 2010, 02:43:25 PM »
Its a top secret procedure! Your almost there though, a little tweeking, if you want the true way, it will cost you $1000000.00, LOL

pizza king millinium,

Speaking as a Moderator, I do not think that it is a good idea for you to reveal anything of a proprietary nature about Jet's operations. I would imagine that Jet's has obligations of confidentiality that bind you even after you leave the company. I will also treat your million dollar comment as a joke so that others don't take what you said seriously.

I have done a fair amount of research on the Jet's operations recently, using only public information. I hope before long to note my findings for Bob's benefit. 

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #26 on: November 24, 2010, 05:04:32 PM »
Bob,

I have detailed below what I have found to date about the Jetís operation and its pizzas. (Note: there are several edits to this post that should be noted as the post is read and studied since they clarify and update certain matters and also address dead links.)

The starting point for my recent research on this subject was the Jetís video at
Jet's Pizza
That supplemented what I found through my earlier research on the Jetís pizzas.

The Jetís Company. The company has its headquarters in Sterling Heights, MI with 194 stores, with 16 more scheduled for opening. There are 141 stores in Michigan alone, with six more on the way. The Michigan connection is a dominant one in the Jetís video referenced above and ties in with some of the information provided below.

The Jet Square Pans. Based on information I uncovered when starting this project, I was told that the Jet pan sizes were 10Ē x 10Ē (small), 13Ē x 15Ē (large), and 15Ē x 18Ē (extra large). There is no medium square pan size. Since the Jetís pans appear to have tapered sides, I canít say where the above measurements were taken but that is something that can be determined by taking measurements of purchased square pizzas from Jetís. After doing a fair amount of Google searching looking for pans with the above dimensions, and coming up empty, I concluded that they must be custom made for Jetís. However, this shouldnít deter us from the task at hand. If we are able to determine the thickness factor of a typical Jetís dough skin that is placed in a given size pan, it should be possible to come up with a dough formulation for essentially any other size pan. The pans used at Jetís appear to be steel rather than aluminum but it is possible that the pans are seasoned or dark anodized aluminum pans. There are not that many sources of square/rectangular steel pans. P.A. Products, which is not that far from the Jetís headquarters, sells steel square/rectangular pans to the trade (see http://www.paprod.com/pans.html) but not in the sizes used in Jetís stores. A search on the forum for steel pans, including blue steel pans, will turn up other sources of such pans but not in the sizes used in Jetís stores. [For an important update on the Jet's pan sizes and source, see EDIT 6 below.]

The Jetís Pizza Dough. The Jetís pizza dough is made daily in the Jetís stores. From what I was able to determine, the dough can be used the same day and any dough beyond that needed for that day to fill orders can be held overnight in a cooler and used the next day. After the second day, any unused dough is apparently discarded. Apparently not all Jet's stores follow that procedure. According to the article at http://plymouth-mi.patch.com/articles/super-bowl-sunday-the-big-game-means-big-business-for-plymouth-pizzerias, one MI Jet's store discards the prior day's dough when making the new dough (note that the new dough is made at around 9 AM for a noontime store opening). The mixer shown in the Jetís video appears to be a Hobart mixer such as shown at http://www.nnysupply.com/mixers/l800.pdf.

I was able to determine that the ingredients used to make the dough for the square pizzas are flour, water, salt, sugar, oil and yeast. I found independent confirmation of this list of ingredients at page 35 of the Northville (MI) public school ingredients list and nutritional information document at http://www.northville.k12.mi.us/district/foodservice/pdfs/MSIngred.pdf. It is quite common for school districts to require ingredients and nutrition information for any products sold to it by outside vendors. Jetís has several programs that cater to businesses, schools and school lunch programs (e.g., see http://www.solake.org/FoodService/docs/menu_MS_201011.pdf). If I had to guess, I would say that the types of pizzas sold by Jetís to school lunch programs are square pizzas. I base this on the fact that Jetís catering menus, at least the several I found online (e.g., see https://order.jetspizza.com/Menu.aspx?T=c&RestaurantID=4e88d34e-0059-467a-b35f-0ca1df188943), were limited to square/party tray type pizzas (http://jetspizza.com/menu/item/27). Again, if I had to guess, the ingredients used to make pizzas for school programs are perhaps the same as used in the Jetís stores. It does not make a lot of sense to have a special dough formulation for only school lunch programs.

In addition to the dough used to make the square pizzas, there appears to be a second type of dough used to make the round NY style pizzas sold at Jetís stores. As noted below, the flour used for the NY style dough is apparently different than that used to make the dough for the square pizzas.

If my analysis on the Jetís dough is correct, it suggests that your dough formulation doesnít fit the parameters of the Jetís dough formulation based on the list and sequencing of ingredients (by weight) discussed above.

As noted in the Nutrition/Allergens section of the Jetís website (http://jetspizza.com/), at http://jetspizza.com/nutrition, the oil used in the dough for the square pizzas is corn oil. Soybean oil is apparently used with the ďthin crust flourĒ, quite likely as part of the flour blend used to make the round pizzas. This would suggest that any oil used in the square pans is corn oil. Previously, in Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8247.msg71260.html#msg71260, I noted that the Allergen information at the time said that Red Star active dry yeast (ADY) was used. Normally, one does not treat dry yeast as an allergen, so that might explain its absence in the current Allergens information. The Jet's video shows the yeast going into the mixer bowl before the water. The usual way of rehydrating ADY is to mix it in warm water. Although instant dry yeast (IDY) can be rehydrated in water, it is usually added to the flour instead. For our purposes, I think I would be inclined to go with ADY and use warm water.

I should also note that there are gaps in the Jet's video. For example, a pitcher of water would not be enough to hydrate 50 pounds of flour. You would need gallons. Also, I suspect that there is more than one can of Jet Fuel that goes into the mixer bowl before diluting it with a can of water.

The Flour and Other Jetís Ingredients. I found a document (The Bulk Gourmet) that is highly unusual because the company behind it (http://www.thebulkgourmet.com/) is in the Barbados (Roatan), but the document, at http://www.thebulkgourmet.com/catalogs/food_kitchen_laundry.pdf, lists several Jetís products, including Jetís Pizza FLOUR UNBLCHD ďPZZA SQĒ 50# JETS (at page 61), FLOUR HI-GLUTEN ďPZZA RNDĒ 50# JETS (also at page 61), SEASONING PIZZA SCE 12-26.7Z CASTELLA (at page 114), and SAUCE PIZZA PREP 6-10 JETS (at page 109). If you enter Jetís in the search box of that document, the search will turn up many other food products and supplies, including pepperoni, wings and other chicken-based products, used by Jetís in its stores. BTW, the ďCastellaĒ reference above is to Castella Imports, at http://www.castella.com/Products/Spices-Seasonings.aspx. Castella prepares proprietary blends of herbs and seasonings for various end users. It does not sell directly to the public. In the Jetís video, it will be noted that the herbs/seasoning blend is added to the mixer bowl right after the Jet Fuel tomato product is added to the bowl along with water to thin it down.

After staring at the above Barbados document for some time and wondering what it was, it finally hit me. It is an expanded or modified products list of Gordon Food Service (GFS), a well-known foodservice company with distribution centers in several states, including Michigan. It took me a fair amount of time to find the current GFS Product Guide to compare it with the Barbados document but I managed to hunt it down at the GFS website (http://www.gfs.com/en). It is the document at http://www.gfs.com/files/pdf/gms/ProductGuide.pdf. To satisfy myself that the Barbados product guide referenced above was an expanded or modified version of the GFS Product Guide, I ran several of the GFS product numbers listed in the Barbados document through the search engine of the current GFS Product Guide. The matches were there. As a matter of fact, I wouldnít be surprised if GFS is the Michigan-based distribution company that Eugene Jetts mentioned in the Jetís video. GFS also has a distribution center in Florida, where Jetís has 10 stores and another on the way. (Note: The Bulk Gourmet Barbados document can also be found at http://www.docstoc.com/docs/41731252/BULK-GOURMET-PRICE-BOOK-UPDATED.)

What I donít yet know about the flour used by Jetís to make its square pizzas is whether the flour is bromated or not. Typically, pan doughs benefit from the use of bromated flours, especially if the dough skins in pans are proofed. If the flour for the square pizzas is bromated, that would rule out all-purpose flours since all-purpose flour is almost never bromated. That leaves us with flour with a protein content of bread flour or high-gluten flour. I think it is safe to say that the flour used to make the NY style doughs is a high-gluten flour, but not the flour used to make the dough for the square pizzas.

Jet Fuel. To see if I could find the source of the Jetís Jet Fuel tomatoes, I did a Google search using the exact phrase ďvine-ripened fresh tomatoes, salt and naturally derived citric acidĒ. This is the phrase that is used in the Northville public school document referenced earlier. The search turned up several tomato products of Stanislaus Food Products, a well-known supplier of tomato products to the pizza industry. My search also turned up a good place to research the Stanislaus tomato products, at http://profileshowcase.com/WEB-AFSProfile/Share/frmSearch.aspx. Selecting Stanislaus from the pull-down menu, I was able to research the Stanislaus tomato products and find detailed profiles on those products (by clicking on the icons on the left). After researching the Stanislaus products, and assuming that Stanislaus is the supplier to Jetís, I would pick one of the Full Red or Saporito puree or ground/crushed tomatoes products as candidates for the Jet Fuel tomato product based on the consistency of the tomato sauce shown in the Jetís video. Stanislaus does not recommend watering down their tomato products (they believe that that damages the fresh tomato flavor) but that is a practice that is common in the industry.

I also ran the Stanislaus name through the The Bulk Gourmet Barbados document and the GFS Product Guide but did not find the particular Stanislaus products mentioned above. However, that shouldnít preclude Stanislaus from packing tomatoes in the Jet Fuel cans and shipping them to GFS for distribution to Jet store locations. We know from the Barbados document that the Jet Fuel tomatoes are listed in their version of the GFS document. As mentioned earlier, the supplier of the pizza sauce seasonings appears to be Castella Imports.

The Mozzarella Cheese. Apparently, the mozzarella cheese used by Jetís comes from the milk of contented cows that have their own mattresses and listen to opera. I thought that this was quite unusual until I did a Google search and found that supplying cows with mattresses and playing music had been done before. An example of what I found is the document at http://www.purefood.org/rbgh/classical_music_milk_production.cfm. That document even goes so far as to list the best type of music to entertain and calm down the cows (the document also notes the less effective music). So, if you decide to get your own cows and treat them like the supplier of milk for the Jetís cheeses, you will know what music is the best to use. You might even sing to your cows to save having to buy audio equipment. For now, based on the Northville public school document referenced above, I would say that Jetís uses low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese as their pizza cheese. Also, according to an article about Jetís at http://community.timesfreepress.com/news/2010/dec/15/jets-pizza-lands-hixson/, it appears that the cheese is grated in-store.

(Note: As an update on the mozzarella cheese, on 1/13/11 and 1/14/11 it was learned through email exchanges with Grande that Grande mozzarella cheese is used by Jet's stores in its network of stores. See Reply 54 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8247.msg123284.html#new. Note also that the description of the Grande part skim loaf mozzarella cheese at http://www.grandecheese.com/products/Pages/Product_Spec.aspx?ProductMasterID=16 is the same as given in the ingredients list in the Northville public school document referenced above. To the best of my knowledge, the only firm mozzarella cheeses that Grande sells in loaf form are the part skim and whole mozzarella cheeses.)

Other Jetís Store Equipment. In addition to the Hobart mixer mentioned earlier, the Jet stores use other equipment. According to this document, http://www.hfse.com/submnu/simple%20parts/Jets%20Pizza%20SPCE.pdf, the other types of equipment used in Jetís stores includes dough rollers (from Anets and Somerset), proofers (from Lockwood) and a conveyor oven (from Middleby-Marshall). More information on these products (other than the proofers) can be found at http://www.anetsberger.com/equipment/ANETS-DoughRoller.pdf, http://www.smrset.com/dough-roller-cdr-1550.shtml and http://www.middleby.com/pdf/mm/4501.pdf.

I spoke recently with sales and customer service reps at Anets and Somerset and was told that the only reason why one would have dough rollers in their stores is to roll out skins. As it turns out, the Anets and Somerset dough rollers, although marketed to make round skins, can also form rectangular skins. For example, at Jetís stores, workers can use the dual-pass feature of the above models of dough rollers to make round skins for their NY style pizzas, which requires turning the skin around 90 degrees after the first pass, or to make rectangular skins for their pan pizzas, which requires passing the skins through the machine twice in the same direction. I was told that the fit of the rectangular skins to pans is almost perfect, without even having to push the skins in the corners to get a good fit. If Jetís wants to tout their round skins as hand tossed, they can use the dough rollers to open up the skins part way (about 2/3 of the final desired skin size) and stretch the dough the rest of the way out by hand. If you want to see how a typical dual-pass dough roller works, see the video for the Somerset CDR-1550 at http://www.smrset.com/dough-roller-cdr-1550.shtml.

I also spoke with a customer service rep at Lookwood (a Michigan company, http://www.lockwoodusa.com/9.html) and was told that Jetís often uses their proofers to keep baked pizzas warm. However, since the Lockwood proofers have separate temperature and humidity control, there is no reason why the proofers canít be used to proof dough skins placed in the Jet square pans. Apparently the side rails of the Lockwood proofers can be removed or reconfigured to hold trays of pans. It is also possible that Jetís uses the proofers for other products, such as rolls used for sandwiches. The dough for such products might even be delivered to Jetís in frozen form. According to the nutrition/allergen section of the Jetís website, Jetís uses certain rolls from Caravan.

Iíd appreciate having your comments and observations once you have had a chance to digest the above information. I might then have some suggestions for courses of action on your part.

Peter

EDIT: Added the Jet Fuel section (11/27/10)
EDIT 2: Added information on yeast and details on hydration and use of Jet Fuel (11/29/10)
EDIT 3: On 11/30/10, I learned from Jet's that the flour used to make the Jet's square pizzas is not bromated (12/11/10)
EDIT 4: On 1/13/11 and 1/14/11, following up on a lead by another member, I learned that Jet's uses mozzarella cheese from Grande for all of its stores.
EDIT 5: On 4/20/11, it was learned from member Pizzahog that a Jet's store he frequents uses the Grande shredded low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese. This is not a material point since the block and shredded forms of this cheese have the same nutrition specs.
EDIT 6: On 4/27/11, I learned from the manufacturer of pan lids used by Jet's (http://www.pizzapanlids.com/) that the three pan sizes are not as noted above. The correct sizes are 8" x 10", 10" x 14" and 12" x 17". The pans used by Jet's are blue steel pans made by Dover Parkersburg and sold by P.A. Products (734-421-1060) and also by Northern Pizza Equipment (1-877-303-5319). See, also, Reply 77 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8247.msg137183.html#msg137183 and the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13687.msg137011.html#msg137011.
EDIT 6 (4/26/13): For the Wayback Machine link to the hfse equipment document, see http://web.archive.org/web/20100216210131/http://www.hfse.com/submnu/simple%20parts/Jets%20Pizza%20SPCE.pdf; there are no Wayback Machine links for the no longer operative links to the Northville foodservive pdf document and to the profileshowcase document. However, a substitute document for the Northville document can be seen at http://hmwww.northville.k12.mi.us/district/foodservice/pdfs/elem-ingredients.pdf, and information on the Stanislaus tomato products can be found at http://www.stanislaus.com/products/nutrition-facts.
EDIT 7 (4/26/13): It appears that the sources of pans mentioned earlier in this thread (and in EDIT 6) and also in the Buddy's and other related threads are no longer sourcing those pans. However, pans for the Detroit style pizza are now being sold by the Detroit Style Pizza Co. (http://detroitstylepizza.co/detroit-style-pizza-pans/).
« Last Edit: April 26, 2013, 08:48:58 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline norma427

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #27 on: November 24, 2010, 09:37:04 PM »
Peter,

I donít mean to interfere with Bobís and your research on Jetís pizza, but is Jetís pizza something like Buddyís Detroit style pizza?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit-style_pizza

I read that Rob Peecher, 42, who owned Peecherís Pizza in Dearborn, Mich., for more than 20 years,  oversees the operations as the general manger for the local restaurants in Florida. Heís also a part-owner of Jetís pizza.
He said in the article I read ďWe donít scorch our pizzas,Ē Peecher said. ďIt takes a little longer to cook them. But it takes time for them to develop.Ē
To me they look similar anyway.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #28 on: November 24, 2010, 09:43:08 PM »
I donít mean to interfere with Bobís and your research on Jetís pizza, but is Jetís pizza something like Buddyís Detroit style pizza?

Norma,

Bob will know better than I, but I would say yes. However, Jet's puts down the sauce and cheese in the usual manner, that is, the sauce goes down before the cheese.

Peter

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #29 on: November 25, 2010, 11:06:51 PM »
Wow, that is some serious sleuthing Peter, following the trail all the way to the Barbados and back to Michigan  :o !
I have eaten a few thousand Jet's since they appeared here in MI and can confirm a little in hope of helping.
-Yup, this a Det style as you and Norma surmised with carmelized cheese crust, crispy bottom, and moist not too bready crumb, but Jet's version uses less pungent mozz cheese and puts it on top as with all toppings.
-I have never seen any device or proofer of any kind to keep the pies warm myself.
-According to my kids the Jet's served at school is the same as the retail.
As best guesses:
I am as sure as I can be without having handled them with a magnet that the pans are steel and super well seasoned.
The GFS linkage you established is quite likely IMHO. 
TF around 0.125 should be close as a starting point.
boboo, if you are in the Det area many on the forum have located sources other than GFS where various ingredients and equipment can be found so post if so.  Good luck and with Peter's help you will get there for sure.


Offline chickenparm

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2010, 01:25:46 AM »
I have worked at Jet's for 20 years, I know everything there is to know about the business.

Well,you want a medal from us here?
 ;D
If you are going to sign up on here and make that Bold statement,and this IS a "Pizza Making" forum,we are going to assume you will help us.The money joke kidding aside...

If not,then why brag online here,you were there 20 years? Doesn't do us folks a bit of good.

Come one,spill everything we need to know!
 :-D




-Bill

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2010, 11:31:05 PM »
-According to my kids the Jet's served at school is the same as the retail.


Hog,

Would it be possible for you to ask your kids whether the Jet's pizzas they get at school are the square pizzas, maybe the party tray (http://jetspizza.com/menu/item/27) or even the 8-Corner pizzas (http://jetspizza.com/menu/item/37)? I didn't see any specific nutrition information for the 8-Corner pizza at the Jet's website but I believe I later read that the 8-Corner pizza is made up of two small square pizzas. That would suggest that the two small square pizzas are cut into a total of eight pieces rather than twelve.

I didn't mention it earlier but if one looks at the Barbados product guide, there are other chains mentioned, including Ruth's Chris, P. F. Chang/Pei Wei and Johnny Rockets. Unless these companies have retail product extensions sold through GFS, this would seem to lend credence to GFS being a distributor for Jet's Pizza.

I also noted in the Jet's video that there are two colored bags of flour, a brownish one for the square pizza and a white one that is perhaps the flour for the NY style.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 27, 2010, 08:52:44 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2010, 11:59:13 AM »
Hi Peter
I prob should have noted my info on the school Jet's may be dated as the kids are all growed up now, but back then they were the square party trays.  The 8 corner pie is indeed 2 small squares served together and cut into larger size pieces than the standard small square, but these pies were not yet sold by Jet's when the kids were in school.
Since joining the forum and researching local pizza and restraunt suppliers, taking note of what ingredients are visible while visiting local pizzeria's, asking questions at same, and even noticing what delivery trucks I encounter while driving about, GFS makes sense.  They are certainly not the only supplier around, but are THE big player are far as I can tell.  Every pizzeria I have visited where I could see behind the sales counter had GFS branded products of some type visible.  Plus, the Jet's video linked earlier in the thread claims their distributor (as well as most everything else) is a MI based company and only GFS fits the bill AFAIK.
Cheese wise this makes sense also as Jet's does not advertise Grande brand as many others do and all my inquiries at GFS indicate they do not handle Grande.  As an aside, I never have been able find just who does handle Grande around here that sells to the public and have never been able to try it!
With all this Jet's talk I may just have to go pick one up this weekend.  If so, or when I next do, I will try and gather some addn'l info.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2010, 12:32:26 PM »
With all this Jet's talk I may just have to go pick one up this weekend.  If so, or when I next do, I will try and gather some addn'l info.


Hog,

Thanks for the update. I was going to give boboo (Bob) a homework assignment once he checks back into this thread. One of the things I was going to ask him to do is to take the measurements of a typical square pie from Jet's. I would tell him to order the pie uncut and to take as many measurements as possible. If the pans are indeed tapered, there should be several measurements. When I do this sort of thing, I do it in the car, right outside the restaurant before the pizza cools down. It is easier to do things to the pizza, including weighing it, when it is uncut.

I don't want or expect you to go through this kind of drill, but I will take any inputs at this point.

Peter

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #34 on: November 27, 2010, 12:50:48 PM »
I don't want or expect you to go through this kind of drill, but I will take any inputs at this point.
Peter
Actually, this sounds fun and I would be happy to contribute.  Luckily for me the nearest and favorite Jet's is just down the road so I could bring it home minutes out of the oven and measure, weigh and disect it in any way helpful.  I usually buy small squares now, would that work or is a large better?  If you could detail the specifics needed I will have at it with the next pie, although that may or may not be this weekend.
Hog

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2010, 01:13:37 PM »
Since joining the forum and researching local pizza and restaurant suppliers, taking note of what ingredients are visible while visiting local pizzeria's, asking questions at same, and even noticing what delivery trucks I encounter while driving about, GFS makes sense.  They are certainly not the only supplier around, but are THE big player are far as I can tell.  Every pizzeria I have visited where I could see behind the sales counter had GFS branded products of some type visible.  Plus, the Jet's video linked earlier in the thread claims their distributor (as well as most everything else) is a MI based company and only GFS fits the bill AFAIK.
Cheese wise this makes sense also as Jet's does not advertise Grande brand as many others do and all my inquiries at GFS indicate they do not handle Grande

Hog,

I remember reading where the owner of a new Jet's store said that they were using a great mozzarella cheese but groused that it cost him an arm and a leg. I would think that mozzarella cheese made from milk produced by cows in their stalls on mattresses listening to opera would cost more than usual. Eugene Jett says in the video that his company goes through 8.5 million pounds of mozzarella cheese a year. That comes to about 3% of the U.S. total annual mozzarella cheese production. I read that a cow on average produces around 20,000 pounds of milk per year and that that amount of milk will make about 2000 pounds of mozzarella cheese (on a 10:1 basis). If those numbers are correct, that means that Eugene Jett has about 4250 cows on his payroll, lounging around on mattresses listening to music  :-D.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #36 on: November 27, 2010, 01:25:49 PM »
Peter
Actually, this sounds fun and I would be happy to contribute.  Luckily for me the nearest and favorite Jet's is just down the road so I could bring it home minutes out of the oven and measure, weigh and disect it in any way helpful.  I usually buy small squares now, would that work or is a large better?  If you could detail the specifics needed I will have at it with the next pie, although that may or may not be this weekend.
Hog

Hog,

That is mighty nice of you to be willing to do that. If you buy the small squares, that should be fine. I can ask Bob to buy a larger size to get the corresponding data, if he is willing to do that.

Basically what I would like to get in your case is the dimensions of the small square. As I mentioned earlier, there may be more measurements than usual because of the apparent tapering of the pans. Then I would like the weight of the pizza. When I go through this kind of exercise, I usually buy either a cheese pizza or one with pepperoni only because it is easier to reverse engineer to get the dough data if there aren't too many toppings. If I get the pepperoni pizza, I measure the diameter of the slices and count how many slices are on the pizza. If I am able to watch the workers who make my pizzas, I try to estimate how much sauce and cheese they put on the pizza. Ultimately the objective is to try to arrive at a dough ball weight and corresponding thickness factor. If you are lucky, a worker might know the dough ball weight and tell you what it is. It does not always hold that the same thickness factor is used for all pan sizes.

There is no urgency on my part, so do what you can at your leisure.

Peter

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #37 on: November 27, 2010, 01:36:43 PM »
Peter
Will do with my next Jet's pie.
However, I think your cow calculation may need some revision.  According to this http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112954171 the mattress lounging cows produce 5% more milk then their not so comfortable cousins.  And that does not take into account any further additions from the music these cows chew their cud to.
Now if I can only find a dairy farm in Michigan with about 4,000 chaise lounging, hoof tapping cows, we will have found this cheese!  I'll have to get back to you on this one...

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #38 on: November 27, 2010, 01:55:48 PM »
However, I think your cow calculation may need some revision.  According to this http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112954171 the mattress lounging cows produce 5% more milk then their not so comfortable cousins.  And that does not take into account any further additions from the music these cows chew their cud to.
Now if I can only find a dairy farm in Michigan with about 4,000 chaise lounging, hoof tapping cows, we will have found this cheese!  I'll have to get back to you on this one...


Hog,

I stand corrected. Everything that I read about lounging cows said that the amount of milk produced increased when the cows were given such nice treatment. However, in the video, Eugene Jett says that the milk is "better", not more.

Peter

Offline boboo

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #39 on: November 29, 2010, 12:48:23 PM »
Just now getting back. Thanks Pete for everything!!!!!

I will get every measurement and weight there is on an uncut large square Jets with only a cheese topping ASAP.

Should I start attempting to get some supplies and pans etc. from these supplier companies you found by some means? 
 
I am not even at novice stage if anyone wants to be sent any supplies to experiment.

I tried the high gluten flour from King Arthur with reduced oil. It was chewier.  First try though did not get the hard bottom crunch. Kind of missed the timing, so couldn't tell yet if any improvement. Will try some more to see the difference. Also, still not getting the thick uncooked chewy layer under the sauce either.

But I noticed Pete that you concluded the square pan did not have a high gluten flour.  So I guess this is not the way to go?

Thanks

Bob