Author Topic: Jets pizza  (Read 90230 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #175 on: October 01, 2012, 04:25:27 PM »
I just found out I have a new Jets Pizza now in my area.....any suggestions? I see that you can order a pie that each slice is a corner piece....folks must luv them Jetts corners!  ;D
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Offline jetsaddict

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #176 on: October 14, 2012, 08:13:25 PM »
Thanks everyone for their contributions.  Decided to start baking to save money, as a bag of flour is insanely cheaper than buying the stuff you can make with it.  Baked my first loaf of bread yesterday, that's as far as my experience goes.  I mainly want to make my own pizza, as buying jets only once a week or so is as much as I have been able to cut back, which is still $15-$20 a week, $80 a month, etc.   

I used the deep dish dough calculator and the values segfault posted.  I used pilsbury bread flour.  Let the dough rise in the bowl for about an hour and a half, and it didn't seem to rise as much as the bread I made yesterday.  The only pan I had was a new 9x5 cheap bread pan.  Oiled the pan with soy bean oil, but the no stick made the oil pool and bead up.  I'm guessing a real pizza pan isn't non stick and would help with this.

I spread the dough in the pan, had a hell of a time getting the dough to go up the edges to form a crust, then let rise for about 3 hours.  After the dough rose again, the edges were easier to form.  I think if the dough was a little drier I could have made the sides a little thicker. The dough seemed too liquidy, but I don't know I've never worked with dough before.   

I used some store bought prego pizza sauce, tasted way too acidic, added sugar to it and it wasn't bad.  Jet's has pretty good pizza sauce, but there's tons of pizza sauce recipes out there so I'm sure I can improve on this, the crust and dough is what makes a Jets pizza for me (and the ranch), the sauce and cheese don't have to be exact. 

I have a very old gas oven, and I preheated it to about 500 F for a half hour with a pizza stone on the second to lowest rack height.  I don't recall anyone else posting how they cooked it, if the used a stone or not, but I figured this would help give the bottom that deep fried crust while not cooking the top as fast. 

I turned the oven down some, somewhere between 450 and 500 F, the oven is not that exact and put the pizza in.  Set a timer for 10 minutes because the pan was so small.  It was done after the ten minutes, faster than I thought, but the cheese was starting to bubble and brown.

It turned out great, not quite Jets, but its a good substitute.  The bottom looked almost the same, much like the other posters, golden brown with the bubbles that weren't' touching the pan. The edges were almost just like Jets but not as thick, although towards the center the pizza was not as crunchy, like others have posted in this thread.  Using a real pizza pan, without the oil beading and pooling up in the nonstick bread pan I used would help I think.   

The dough was not quite as fluffy or thick as jets, maybe could rise longer or use more yeast? Or possibly even more dough?  Jets also seems to have the bottom 1/4" of dough deep fried, where mine was just the 1/8" or less of the bottom, if that makes any sense.  There was no grease or oil left on my pizza, where jets usually has ample.  Maybe use more oil in the pan next time, and a real pan might help.  I don't think using the soybean oil I had would be any different from corn oil.

The top was doughy like Jets, probably helped by the fact I used too much sauce, and a little too much cheese.  I'm sure getting the entire bottom fried and leaving to top doughy would be very hard to accomplish without the conveyor belt ovens they have.  My oven goes up to 550, I was thinking of preheating the pizza stone as high as I can then turning the oven down to cook the pizza, I'm just worried the edges might get burnt.

I made my own ranch with hidden valley buttermilk packet.  I used one cup of buttermilk, half a cup of mayo, and half a cup of sour cream.  Pretty close to jets ranch, but not as tangy and I think I can taste the mayo.  Jets has the best ranch imo.  My fiance used to work at jets like ten years ago and she swears they used hidden valley packets to make their ranch.  But Jet's ranch seems more oily than what I made, do people make ranch with oil?  From what she remembers the pizza making procedure is the same as everyone else described.     

I can't believe how good my pizza turned out, especially using a bread pan and never baking anything before.  Thought I'd share how mine turned out, thanks everyone for trying to replicate Jet's and posting the results. 

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #177 on: October 14, 2012, 08:29:13 PM »
Sounds great addict...your instincts are quite impressive so it is no wonder your first attempt turned out so well. Go with that different pan idea of yours...you will see a BIG improvement.  ;)
Nice job man!  :chef:
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Offline segfault

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #178 on: March 17, 2014, 10:06:40 PM »
i feel like bumping this thread, for the past year(s)+ I've played around with the amount of corn oil i use, bake times, temperatures, and can never quite replicate the crunch that a jet's pizza provides.  short of getting a temp job there, i'm throwing in the towel :P


Offline norma427

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #179 on: March 18, 2014, 06:39:41 AM »
i feel like bumping this thread, for the past year(s)+ I've played around with the amount of corn oil i use, bake times, temperatures, and can never quite replicate the crunch that a jet's pizza provides.  short of getting a temp job there, i'm throwing in the towel :P

segfault,

You might want to look at Peter post at Reply 7 and some of other posts on that thread http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=23495.msg238665#msg238665 to see if you can get some helpful information about a Jet's pizza.

The Sicilian pizzas I was experimenting with on another thread really weren't a Jet's clone, but I was trying to achieve something like a Jet's pizza.  This is one example of the Sicilian pizza I made at Reply 60 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=18281.msg180372#msg180372 and the next few posts.  If you look through that thread it can be seen what formulations I tried.

Norma

Offline RPCLady

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #180 on: April 07, 2014, 07:24:02 PM »
Greetings!  I know this thread got started quite awhile ago, but I wanted to let you know I enjoyed reading through it!  My computer is broken so I can't watch the video clips here on the forums however I finally took some time and was able to watch the youtube videos on my smart TV today....while searching for videos featuring Jet's I found this gem:

 

Offline RockyMountainPie

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #181 on: April 12, 2014, 02:46:37 AM »
RPCLady,

A lot of good information there on the process of making a Jet's pizza.  Thanks for posting it!



Offline daveJay

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #182 on: August 13, 2014, 12:24:26 PM »
Hey everyone. I see this thread is a bit old, but I just finished reading the entire chain of messages and am fascinated by it all. Especially the level of dedication by Pete and Norma who haven't even ever had a Jet's pizza before! Thanks to you both.

I'd like to try using the formulation by Segfault on reply 161 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg164370#msg164370 because he seemed to get the best result of a crispy crust. I ordered a 10" x 14" pizza pan from Detroit Style Pizza (http://detroitstylepizza.co/detroit-style-pizza-pans/) and am waiting for that to arrive, but in the meantime I thought I'd simply try cooking it in my Lodge Iron Skillet.

Anyway, I have a question on the process for how you're supposed to make the dough with the results on those formulations. Ahamric posted the steps of what he did in reply 171 : http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg170815#msg170815

After he mixed the dry ingredients with the water and had a lump of dough, he said he oiled it and sealed it in a container for 5 hours. This seems to perhaps be what Norma does every time she makes an attempt also? What is this step for? Is it simply to let the dough rise?

Then he moved it to the pizza pan which was coated with the corn oil. Stretched it out to fit the pan and covered it for an hour and 15 minutes. I assume this also is to let the dough rise?

I'm new to this whole cooking with yeast thing, so I'm just wondering if I can get some clarification on what the process should be? It seems like I could just roll out the dough immediately after I make it and let it rise in the pan. Or let it rise in the mixer bowl first, and then roll it out and put it in the pan and cook it. Is it necessary to let it rise twice?

Also, I bought some Instant Dry Yeast. Does the rising process change if I use Active dry yeast in my formulation instead?

Sorry for the noob post. Once I figure out what I'm supposed to do, I'm eager to post some pictures of my attempt!


Offline robear00

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #183 on: April 29, 2015, 12:04:57 PM »
Ok, I did a search of topics and it doesn't seem like anyone is talking about this recipe.  If so, my apologies for missing it. 

Anyway, what I am trying to do is kind of combine the best of both worlds.  If anyone has tried it in the Midwest, there is a place called Casey's General Store that makes a pretty good breakfast pizza.  I've been able to make my own version of it and I have friends from South Dakota that say it is VERY close.  What I what to do is turn it into a Detroit deep dish and put the ingredients on a Jets-style dough.  I plan on trying a couple of the recipes here, but was wondered about something:

Considering all of the talk that has been in this topic about weights and measures, has anybody just walked into a Jets and just asked to buy a ball of dough?  The location by my house lets me do this and charges $3.50/ea. (cashiers, especially new ones, will give me a weird look, but the managers take care of it well), but I've never done the deep dish style as I've never had a pan for it (ordering one soon). 

At any rate, I'm still very new into making dough as mine is typically store bought, so I'm not sure if there would be any useful information in this buying the dough.  I would think, if anything, to test the pan with their dough to figure out the crunch factor.


Offline daveJay

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #184 on: April 29, 2015, 01:54:57 PM »
I like that idea! My dough is never as crunchy as jets, so that would be a good way to see if it's my recipe or my form of cooking it.

What's the recipe for your breakfast pizza you like out of curiosity?

Offline robear00

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #185 on: April 29, 2015, 02:06:10 PM »
I do a variation on Casey's General Store's recipe.  Looking through the board, today was the first I've heard of thinning Velveeta, so I'm going to try that.  Sausage and eggs are the same, but I use a simple candied bacon.  I coat strips in dark brown sugar and pepper, then bake them.  Let them rest for a bit, then cut into bits.