Author Topic: sourdo culture initial temp question  (Read 3029 times)

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Offline tommy

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sourdo culture initial temp question
« on: March 26, 2009, 06:58:20 PM »
A question for you guys (and yes, I've read and read and read, for years now!).  I didn't want to hijack an existing thread, as they all seem to be progressing nicely, so I figured a new one would be good for my (hopefully) quick question...

I'm going to activate my sough dough culture from Sourdo.com.

To kick it off, the Ed Wood book suggests 24 hours at 90 degrees.  However, my options are:
1) 110 degrees in my oven's "proof" mode
2) about 70 degrees on my counter under the under-cabinet lights.

any thoughts on which is preferable and more likely to yield good results?  My last attempt ended, miserably. 


Offline Matthew

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2009, 07:12:47 PM »
A question for you guys (and yes, I've read and read and read, for years now!).  I didn't want to hijack an existing thread, as they all seem to be progressing nicely, so I figured a new one would be good for my (hopefully) quick question...

I'm going to activate my sough dough culture from Sourdo.com.

To kick it off, the Ed Wood book suggests 24 hours at 90 degrees.  However, my options are:
1) 110 degrees in my oven's "proof" mode
2) about 70 degrees on my counter under the under-cabinet lights.

any thoughts on which is preferable and more likely to yield good results?  My last attempt ended, miserably. 


What about placing it in the oven with the oven light on?  That will get you pretty close to 80 degrees.

Matt

Offline Mo

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2009, 08:44:37 PM »
What about placing it in the oven with the oven light on?  That will get you pretty close to 80 degrees.

Matt

A ha! I can (maybe?) help on this one. I would say, based on my very recent experience, that 80 is still not warm enough to prevent contamination. I ran at 80-84 initially and it contaminated within 24hrs. 90 degrees is the magic number (in my, granted, limited experience).

And of course you know what's next: After 24 hours, take it OUT of the 90 degrees and into room temp surroundings for the remainder of activation.


Offline Mo

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2009, 08:47:13 PM »
A question for you guys (and yes, I've read and read and read, for years now!).  I didn't want to hijack an existing thread, as they all seem to be progressing nicely, so I figured a new one would be good for my (hopefully) quick question...

I'm going to activate my sough dough culture from Sourdo.com.

To kick it off, the Ed Wood book suggests 24 hours at 90 degrees.  However, my options are:
1) 110 degrees in my oven's "proof" mode
2) about 70 degrees on my counter under the under-cabinet lights.

any thoughts on which is preferable and more likely to yield good results?  My last attempt ended, miserably. 


Ed also suggests that the cultures will be killed off at temps over 100 degrees.

Offline tommy

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2009, 09:03:59 PM »
yeah I didn't see any upper limits mentioned in the book which is why I figured I'd ask here.  if 100 is the cut-off then clearly the oven with the light on is the best option.

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2009, 09:16:02 PM »
tommy,

I don't know if you have the time or patience to build a proof box before you start, but Ed gives directions to build one in his literature. 

DH bought a Coleman cooler, drilled two holes: one in the lid for a stem thermometer and one in the side for a low wattage lightbulb and put a rheostat in the cord so that I can control how brightly the light shines.  It works like a charm.... I can control the temp perfectly between ~70o F and 110o, which is perfect for making homemade yogurt.  It's a great solution.... and you could always use a styrofoam cooler if you don't want to put out the $$ for a more sturdy one.  I use mine for bread, pizza, yogurt, sour cream, etc....  and it will hold the temp for days at a time, if need be.

Just a thought...

~sd
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Online JConk007

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2009, 09:33:55 PM »
Sourdough,
So I have a nice warming drawer with my wolf oven set up. Can I simply use that drawer for 24 hrs initially and set at 90 degrees? I Can set it from 60-200 degrees so I need the magic #
I am ready to give this ischia /sourdo.com starter a shot. The WFO will be cooking soon so I figure I better start trying to get something going now? I am also anxious to try some WFO breads this year now that Ive got my feet wet.
Thanks
John
« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 09:37:19 PM by JConk007 »
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Offline sourdough girl

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2009, 09:54:14 PM »
John,

Yes, I would get it started now... and if you have a warming drawer that will keep the temp a steady 90o, that would be perfect.  The cultures will develop to their full flavors as you use them, so better to start sooner than later.  As for the "magic #", just follow the temperature instructions that Ed supplies, which should be easy with the temperature range your oven has.

My oven has a proof setting which I have not used because DH built my proof box before I got this GE Profile set up.  It's also nice not to tie up the full oven for so long... I often ferment my yogurt for 18 hours for a stronger flavor.  I guess I love SOUR!   ;)  If I ever have a need to work on two projects at once, though, it will come in handy.

~sd
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Offline tommy

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2009, 08:54:42 AM »
well, we just remodeled our kitchen, and we said "why would we need a warming drawer, that would be a waste of space for us."  clearly we were wrong.  :-\

And my oven light doesn't go on unless the oven is on or the door is open.

Time for another plan, something that will likely resemble an Easy-Bake oven.

Online JConk007

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2009, 09:16:36 AM »
Yes, Personally I would have not dumped the $1500 for a silly drawer because it looks cool with the set up.
BUT...
Since we went with the 36" Wolf 6 burner Dual fuel Freestanding range, and the 3 piece wall setup shown Micro/Oven/Warming drawer,  at that point I kinda gave up and threw up the white (and green$!) towel.
By the way its only 3 of us, little overkill?
Now I can can use it for more than than Thanksgiving Day ;D
I must say I am very very happy with these appliances and if it helps me to get this starter going, so I can make a Tastier pie thats a bonus beyond the stone setting, the cool blue interior, red knobs ....
J
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Offline tommy

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2009, 09:35:51 AM »
Well right now i've got a lightbulb in my oven, and I'll see where that gets me.  I'm thinking the wife will let this set-up slide more than she would a cooler with a lightbulb.  She's not going to be pleased with that set-up.  Then again, if it's in the basement, no one's the wiser.  >:D

JConk007, with that brick oven of yours I wouldn't even need a kitchen, much less that 3 piece unit!

Online JConk007

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2009, 09:41:23 AM »
The basement sounds like a perfect place for experimenting. As I have mentioned before the oven is really cool! and I would cook at any temperature. The Real problem is the mess from the going in and out that gets her shut down for the winter. Its a Seasonal full out door kitchen, but I have no door from the WFO to Kitchen :'(
Cant wait to fire up and get a starter going.
John
« Last Edit: March 27, 2009, 09:45:15 AM by JConk007 »
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2009, 09:58:07 AM »
tommy,

If you want to see what the Ed Wood type of proofing box mentioned by sourdough girl looks like, see Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,403.msg4887.html#msg4887. I subsequently added a viewing window to it, as shown at Reply 69 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg49752/topicseen.html#msg49752. The proofing box is one of my most useful pizza making tools. It isn't a thing of beauty that you want to show off to your friends but it is cheap, lightweight, does the job beautifully, and can be easily stored when not in use.

Peter

Offline tommy

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2009, 10:08:25 AM »
great info as always, Pete-zza.   My oven is now up to 80 degrees.  I'm hoping it'll level out at 90, but if this doesn't work, it's time for your approach.

JConk007, you have no door to your outdoor kitchen?  That's funny, because my front door leads directly to your outdoor kitchen!

Offline WestCountry

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2009, 12:05:30 PM »
Tommy,
I recently activated Ischia after sitting on it for 3 years in the package. I held temp at 90 degree F (per instruction) and built the proofing box like Peter shows above. It works great. The Ischia activated nicely and now I am using the proofing box twice a week for the ongoing culture preparation. I thought about buying a more sophisticated proofing box, but this works so well I have no reason to.

Anyway good luck, I learned a TON through this process.
Chris

Online JConk007

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Re: sourdo culture initial temp question
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2009, 03:32:37 PM »
Clarification;
There is no door from the outdoor kitchen where the Pizza oven is , directly too the kitchen.I Do have back door however I must tromp past a bathroom, Laundry room, through Den, with nice hardwood floors up 2 stairs, then I am in the kithen, where the bay window over the sink overlooks the cooking area. whew! The snow salt ice .... is well you can picture it. see you there Tommy! bring your starter ;)
J
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