Author Topic: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes  (Read 43686 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« on: March 31, 2009, 02:30:15 PM »
From time to time, members have requested dough recipes that can be practiced within a few hours. These recipes are sometimes referred to as “emergency”, “short-time” or “short-term” dough recipes. I will refer to such recipes collectively in this writing as “emergency” dough recipes. Typically, the emergency doughs are made and used in a period of up to about four hours and the doughs are usually fermented at room temperature. On occasion, a combination of room temperature fermentation and cold fermentation can be used. In most cases, emergency doughs use a lot more yeast than used to make normal doughs and a water temperature that is considerably higher than used to make normal doughs. However, there can be variations, as noted in many of the dough formulations referenced in this thread.

For the convenience and benefit of those members who are interested in emergency dough recipes, I have attempted to collect and categorize by style some of the more notable ones of such recipes that I have identified over time. I have not attempted to find and link every emergency dough recipe ever posted on this forum although I am willing to revise this document as other worthy emergency dough recipes come, or are brought, to my attention. For those recipes that I could not specifically identify by style, I have simply labeled as “General”. In some cases, there are multiple versions of the recipes noted and they are often scattered throughout a thread and developed piecemeal over time. That means that people will have to read the threads to find the recipe or version that best meets their particular needs. I have not attempted to single out every version of a particular emergency dough recipe or to rewrite any such recipe or adapt it to a particular situation. My only goal was to create a compilation of some of the more notable emergency dough recipes.

New York Style

1. Emergency Version of Lehmann NY Style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg27251.html#msg27251 (Reply 407) and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg27252.html#msg27252 (Reply 408).

2. Pizza Shark’s NY Style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3736.msg31160.html#msg31160.

3. Steve’s Quick & Easy NY Pie: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2790.msg24104.html#msg24104/; for a baker’s percent version, see http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2790.msg27551.html#msg27551 (Reply 35); see, also, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13038.msg127422.html#msg127422.

4. Flagpull’s Super Super Emergency Recipe: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8049.msg69249.html#msg69249.

5. Addicted's "My NY": http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,685.msg6164.html#msg6164.

6. c0mpl3x NY Style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.msg109552.html#msg109552; see also the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,24813.msg250630.html#msg250630.

American

1. Papa John’s Clone: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg66312.html#msg66312 (Reply 52); see also http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg66655.html#msg66655 (Reply 57) and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg80757.html#msg80757 (Reply 107).

2. Pizza Hut Clone Pan Pizza: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 (Reply 6). Note: This recipe is normally intended to be used after a long period of cold fermentation but was used by one member after only about four hours of cold fermentation, as described at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8084.msg69479.html#msg69479.

3. c0mpl3x Pan Style Pizza using a bread machine: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25612.msg258228.html#msg258228

Chicago Deep-Dish

1. loowater's Malnati's Deep-Dish Clone Dough Using an All-Purpose/Semolina Flour Blend: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6480.msg71749.html#msg71749 (Reply 157).

Chicago-Thin

1. Goosen1 Chicago-Style Thin Crust: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5002.0.html.

2. loowaters Generic Chicago Thin Crust: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6368.msg54574.html#msg54574.

3. loowaters Home Run Inn Clone: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.0.html.

4. itsinthesauce South Side Thin Crust: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4676.msg39865.html#msg39865.

5. Nate's (pythonic's) Chicago Thin: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,28884.msg290555.html#msg290555

Neapolitan

1. Bread Machine Caputo Dough: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9876.0.html.

2. John Della Vecchia's Caputo/AP Neapolitan-Style for WFO: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12545.msg119839.html#msg119839.; for a related post, see Reply 84 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=29303.msg328268#msg328268

Sicilian

1. PizzaHog Detroit Style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3783.msg68373.html#msg68373 (see recipe in Reply 63).

2. Norma's Buddy's Detroit Style Clones (several versions, including cold fermented versions as well): http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21559.msg217567.html#msg217567.

3. Sicilian style by c0mpl3x (Jon): Reply 1225 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26286.msg334351#msg334351, with baker's percent version at Reply 1256 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26286.msg334751#msg334751.

Cracker

1. Steve's Shakey's Style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1311.msg11794.html#msg11794.; see, also, Reply 896 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11391.msg289224.html#msg289224 .

2. bakeshack's (Marlon's) Starter Leavened Cracker Style:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21326.msg214946.html#msg214946.

General

1. Y-TOWN Pizza Class Recipe: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3146.msg26686.html#msg26686; for the actual recipe, see http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3146.msg26822.html#msg26822 (Reply 15); for a baker’s percent version, see http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3146.msg27116.html#msg27116 (Reply 28); for an update (10/13), see http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,27914.msg282249.html#msg282249. Note: These recipes most closely resemble thin versions of an American style pizza.

2. DenaliPete: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7405.msg63813.html#msg63813.

3. Lehmann Home-Style Recipe: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7892.msg67686.html#msg67686. Note: This recipe most closely resembles a thin version of an American style pizza.

4. Mike's (Essen1's) American/NY Hybrid Style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,24197.msg245588.html#msg245588. For a sourdough version of Mike's emergency dough as created by member fazzari (John), see http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,24358.msg246970.html#msg246970.

5. pizzaisgood's Super Fast Dough recipe: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5131.msg44002/topicseen.html#msg44002 (Reply 8).

6.  Last-Minute Pizza Dough recipe Using 00 Flour and Proofing Box: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2250.msg19793.html#msg19793 (Reply 12); see similar recipe at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,637.msg5857.html#msg5857 (Reply 2); there are other variations in the same thread.

7. King Arthur Italian-Style Flour: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1217.msg10917.html#msg10917.

8. "Pourable Pizza Dough": http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7924.0.html.

9. Rustic Ciabatta Dough Recipe: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8539.0/topicseen.html; see, also, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13597.msg135644.html#msg135644.

10. Combination of Caputo 00 Flour and Whole Wheat Flour, Using 2Stone Unit: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12157.msg114607.html#msg114607 (this recipe is a variation of the Caputo recipe at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9876.0.html.

Specialty Grain

1. Whole Wheat/All-purpose flour blend: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8177.msg70422.html#msg70422.

Peter


Offline zalicious

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2009, 06:06:32 PM »
That's an awesome resource, Peter. Thank you!

Offline norma427

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2009, 01:34:10 PM »
That you for the great resources Peter, I need to get studying all of them. 
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline mmarston

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2009, 03:12:04 PM »
Thanks Peter,

This is great!

Michael
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2009, 03:48:45 PM »
That you for the great resources Peter, I need to get studying all of them. 

Norma,

You should keep in mind that professionals don't make their core pizza products from an emergency dough. I am sure that it happens from time to time, but most pizza operators who use emergency doughs tend to have two dough formulations--their regular one and an emergency version of the regular formulation that they can use when they run out of their regular dough or there is a power failure that renders their regular dough unusable, etc. That way, their customers are unlikely to notice that there was a dough shift. I posted the compilation mainly for our members who make pizza at home and might like to try different kinds of pizzas on short notice. Their emergency is more likely to be unstoppable hunger pangs that can only be remedied by a quick pizza fix. However, reading the dough formulations I listed in the compilation will teach you a lot about how emergency doughs are made, particularly how the formulations call for far above average amounts of yeast and much warmer dough temperatures.

Peter

Offline Corbs

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2009, 12:39:31 PM »
This is a great resource, thanks Pete-zza

Offline tzoavva

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2010, 07:45:48 PM »
Definitely a link worthy being bumped for others to see.  Thanks Peter for all the work to put this list together.

Joanna

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2010, 09:11:04 PM »
basic ny style 3-5 hour dough.

100% flour
65% water
1.2% yeast (ady)
1.6% salt
1% sugar
2.3% oil.

mix all the dry, then add the water/oil with a temp of around 90.  mixed it by spoon until it was about 80% incorporated, then threw it on a floured counter and kneaded it for about 6 minutes.  split it into two balls, place into lightly oiled bowls (i used soybean oil spray) and covered them with plastic wrap.   3.5 hours later, dough was doubled.   floured the counter again, and spun out one 14" and one 16".  i used 20oz doughballs roughly. topped it with jo-de sauce (stanislaus of some sort) shredded mozz, colby jack, and parm/romano (the dark 'burnt' spots) are from the parm/romano.   wish my phone saved the picture of the crumb, it looked fantastic for a 3.5 hour rise.

Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline Chet

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2011, 07:51:30 PM »

  Compl3x

   Tried you recipe today, good taste. will make it again, topped it with San marzano tomatoes, mozzeralla cheese, Fontina cheese, and some mushrooms.

   Chet


Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2011, 07:56:08 PM »
looks good. i think you are the first anyone to try any of my recipes
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.


Offline Chet

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2011, 09:35:52 PM »


  Compl3x

  I normally make my pizza doughs 2-3 days in advance. but wanted to try a sameday pizza dough, different texture and my wife really likes it. next time I try this recipe I will see how it works for a Neopolitan style crust, today's crust was more of a pan type dough about 3/8" thick, excellent oven spring.

  Chet

Offline Pizzaiola

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2011, 11:04:09 AM »
For an Emergency-dough the most important thing is that you use a flour with a very low W like W200 or around that!
If you use a Manitoba flour, the W is going to be 280 at least and if you don't give it at least a 24 hour maturation and rising time it's going to be indigestible !!!

Hope this helps!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2011, 01:43:00 PM »
Pizzaiola,

That is a good point--one that Marco (pizzanapoletana) often made with respect to doughs that were not fermented long enough. Indigestion is one of the tradeoffs when you want a pizza in a hurry. We have some members who actually prefer emergency dough pizzas on their own merits. Most people like emergency pizzas because they can be made on short notice to meet a need or simply for convenience.

Peter

Offline Clive At Five

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2011, 02:22:53 AM »
Hey, all.

I've been making a lot of deep dish pizzas lately. So much so, that when I invited my parents over for pizza this week, my mother (who apparently can't handle any more deep dish ???) requested a "traditional" pizza. Since I started my pizza adventures with this site, I have not made anything but deep dish and a couple (and I really do mean a couple) "nearly-politan" pies. So I've been in a little bit of a panic. How do I make a "traditional" pizza? I started scouring the site for recipes that could be made in a hurry so that I could get a couple test runs in before Friday.

Now the Minneapolis/St. Paul area isn't known for its NY-Style, but we do have a few imitators, which I occasionally enjoy. I'm not going to pretend to know what "TRUE" NY-Style is supposed to be, but I have a general idea. And I've been doing a lot of research here in the past few days. I decided that one of these "Emergency" doughs would have to do for now. After much deliberation, I decided to try a variation on c0mpl3x's formulation above.

100% Bread Flour
1T of Vital Wheat Gluten
65% water
1.2% yeast (ady)
1.6% salt
1% sugar
4% oil

Note #1: The oil at 4% was actually an accident. I mis-read my weights and added a bit too much, which I retro-calculated back to about 4%.
Note #2: I've been reading many posts about VWG and decided to add some... It was really a spur-of-the-moment decision, after I had calc'd my weights. The box said to add 1T to any bread recipe. I decided not to get too technical and just threw in 1T.

I was making a 14" pie with a TF of 0.1. After proofing the yeast, combining the dry ingredients, and adding the wet to the dry, I mixed everything in my KitchenAid for 6 minutes on speed [2]. After a 20-minute rest, I mixed again for 4 minutes, except this time, I would insert 15-second intervals of high-speed mixing... a technique I remember watching in a video posted for a member here as a tutorial of how to get nice gluten formation for Ciabatta and Neapolitan pies. I did a warm-oven rise for 90 minutes, a punch-down, and another 45-minute rise. (During the second rise, I removed the dough from the oven and began pre-heating my stone on full-blast.)

(Pic1) shows my working station. I don't have a peel. I just don't make enough on-stone pizzas to justify it at this point. I used a semolina-dusted metal baking sheet and have no serious complaints. Also-pictured: homemade tomato sauce, a store-bought blend of provolone and Motz cheese, and Hormel pepperoni. (Pic2) is my skin. It was actually pretty difficult to stretch, but with persistence, I finally turned it out into a 14" disk. (Pic3) shows the dressed skin.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2011, 08:25:10 AM by Clive At Five »

Offline Clive At Five

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2011, 02:23:20 AM »
(Pic4) After I slid the pie on the stone, I reduced the heat to 450, which probably had little-to-no effect, since most of the heat was coming from the stone. I cooked the pie for approximately 5 minutes on the stone, then I threw it under the broiler for *maybe* a minute. (Pic5) is the up-skirt. Decent char marks here and there. (Pic6) Crumb-shot. Wow. Even I'm surprised at how well this turned out. It was nice and chewy. My only complaint is that the portabella mushrooms released a lot more liquid than I expected. When I cook for my parents on Friday, I will likely slice them in half... they were just too much.

So, yeah, I was pretty damn impressed for my first NY-Style pizza. Thanks for the direction, especially c0mpl3x & Peter.

-Clive
« Last Edit: December 08, 2011, 08:26:19 AM by Clive At Five »

Offline norma427

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2011, 07:26:12 AM »
Clive,

I would say your “emergency” dough formula and final pizza were a success!  Great looking pie and crumb.   :)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Clive At Five

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2011, 03:04:37 PM »
Thanks Norma!  :)

Offline Zensojourner

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2012, 04:34:58 PM »
I use the recipe for NY Style dough from the recipe section, but I don't keep it overnight.  I usually chill it for a couple of hours tops.  It doesn't make a NY style crust this way but the crust it makes is very good - gets a good crunch on the bottom (baked on a preheated stone at the top temp my oven can get to).

I throw all the ingredients in the bucked of my Zo and let it knead for 15 mins, let it rise in there for an hour, then take it out and punch it down, put it in an oiled bowl and turn it a few times to get the dough ball oiled, cover with plastic wrap, and stick in the fridge until an hour or two before I'm ready to bake.

I've discovered I can actually roll this dough out when I'm in a hurry if I do it right out of the fridge and let it come to temp (covered so it won't dry out) already rolled out.  Doing it this way we couldn't tell a difference between the hand stretched dough and the rolled and left to warm up that way dough.  If you let it come up to temp and then roll it out, it makes a slightly denser crust.  My son STILL couldn't tell the difference, but I could tell a slight difference, so henceforth, when I'm in a hurry, I'll roll it out cold, cover, and let rest before baking.

Oh yeah, and topping right before going into the oven. 

Offline PowerWagonPete

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2012, 04:10:22 PM »
The flavor of any "emergency" pizza dough recipe can be vastly improved by adding a dash of red wine vinegar to the mix.   ;D

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Collection: "Emergency" Dough Recipes
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2013, 11:27:39 AM »
...or beer.  ;D


 

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