Author Topic: Baker's yeast quantity prediction model - please compare to your results  (Read 20381 times)

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Online TXCraig1

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Re: Baker's yeast quantity prediction model - please compare to your results
« Reply #200 on: December 12, 2014, 05:14:11 PM »
In case others are using Cake Yeast (CY) - and are experiencing faster than predicted activity - I am as well.  The chart predicts that 0.15% CY at 55F will be ready in 43 hours.  Mine was ready at 12 hours.  I had similar results in an earlier batch as well.  Weight measurements were done with a jewelers scale (on a 4-doughball batch) and cooler temps were set digitally and verified by two other thermometers.
Dave

It's an interesting question, Dave. I've studied a lot of fermentation data posted in this forum, and the variability is inexplicably large. As relates to the example you just posted, consider this post from Marlon: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21730.0.html, In it, he uses 0.1% for 26 hours at 65F. It hardly seems possible that you used only 50% more yeast while dropping the temperature 10F and your dough was ready in less than half the time - yet this is what happened in your case.

This project has been frustrating because there is no possible way to reconcile all the different things that people claim to work. Obviously people's unique situations introduce a lot of variability, but even so, the differences are far broader anything I would have expected before I started working on it.

In the end, it's nothing more than I have said from the beginning - a tool to give you a starting point. Almost certainly you will have to tweak things some to get your dough where you want it - though your result here is by far the biggest bust anyone has ever reported.

If you try to recreate this result, please post if you get consistent results or not. A couple weeks ago, I noticed that when I got home from the grocery store, I only paid $0.28 for a 2# piece of salmon. They weighed the fish on a very accurate scale that was not properly zeroed.
Pizza is not bread.


Offline Tampa

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Re: Baker's yeast quantity prediction model - please compare to your results
« Reply #201 on: December 13, 2014, 07:38:18 PM »
It's an interesting question, Dave. I've studied a lot of fermentation data posted in this forum, and the variability is inexplicably large. As relates to the example you just posted, consider this post from Marlon: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21730.0.html, In it, he uses 0.1% for 26 hours at 65F. It hardly seems possible that you used only 50% more yeast while dropping the temperature 10F and your dough was ready in less than half the time - yet this is what happened in your case.

This project has been frustrating because there is no possible way to reconcile all the different things that people claim to work. Obviously people's unique situations introduce a lot of variability, but even so, the differences are far broader anything I would have expected before I started working on it.

In the end, it's nothing more than I have said from the beginning - a tool to give you a starting point. Almost certainly you will have to tweak things some to get your dough where you want it - though your result here is by far the biggest bust anyone has ever reported.

If you try to recreate this result, please post if you get consistent results or not. A couple weeks ago, I noticed that when I got home from the grocery store, I only paid $0.28 for a 2# piece of salmon. They weighed the fish on a very accurate scale that was not properly zeroed.
Sorry for adding to the frustration.  From the inception, your creating, sharing, and refining this tool for the rest of us doughboys was pure genius.  I'll look into the scale calibration.

Update: I should be able to get calibration weights in the next few days (when Bobino returns from travels).  In the meantime, I compared the opening of the dough shown in the picture against a second doughball (from the same batch) on the second day, and a third doughball on day three.  The flour was HG Kyrol at 60% hydration.  Day one (the picture) was a fight with gluten strength, day two was better, and day three was the best.  Perhaps I misjudged the readiness on smaller 00-type yeast activity and should have been more patient and trusted in the chart.  Next time...

Dave
« Last Edit: December 15, 2014, 08:23:58 AM by Tampa »


 

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