Author Topic: Semolina  (Read 6453 times)

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Offline Crusty

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Semolina
« on: February 04, 2005, 11:54:48 AM »
Does anyone use Semolina?  I see it called out on occasion.  What is it used for ?

Thanks



Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2005, 12:59:56 PM »
Hi Crusty ( from the Simpsons ? ) hehe.

Semolina is usually used for noodles, like spaghetti, etc, I am not really educated on this though, so perhaps you can use
it in pizza dough....  anyone else ?

Mark
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Offline pftaylor

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2005, 01:21:34 PM »
I've heard it adds a more rustic appearance to a pie giving it an old world look.
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Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2005, 01:30:29 PM »
ok I did some fast Goolin' and foud a bit of info from different sites:


http://www.cuisinenet.com/digest/ingred/semolina.shtml
Semolina is coarsely ground durum wheat, a highly glutinous (hard) wheat. When other grains, such as rice or corn, are similarly ground, they are referred to as "semolina," i.e., "corn semolina" or "rice semolina."

---
http://www.deliaonline.com/ingredients/ingredientsatoz/i_0000000223.asp
Semolina
 
 This word comes from the Italian, meaning semi-milled, and it's not ground to fine flour. Semolina is what is used for traditionally made pasta – milled from hard wheat grain to a texture specified by the pasta maker, so that the finished product will be rough-textured to enable the sauce to cling sufficiently. Semolina, from softer wheat, has also played a part in British cuisine, where it has been used in puddings and cakes, and durum semolina gives a lovely texture to shortbread but is now, sadly, not widely available.

---

http://www.freep.com/features/food/selasky11e_20050111.htm
ASK THE TEST KITCHEN: Semolina, hard wheat, is a pasta basic
January 11, 2005

BY SUSAN SELASKY
FREE PRESS TEST KITCHEN WRITER


What is semolina flour or semolina durum? Virginia Wilson of Bloomfield Hills asked the Test Kitchen recently. It was the first ingredient listed on a package of pasta that Wilson had.


Semolina is a pale, yellowish grind made from durum wheat, which is the hardest of all wheats. According to the North Dakota Wheat Commission (North Dakota produces nearly 75 percent of the U.S. durum crop), durum wheat's yellow endosperm is what gives the pasta its golden hue. Most good dry pastas are made from and labeled semolina or durum wheat.


Look for semolina at some specialty stores and larger grocery stores in the baking aisle near specialty flours. We found a version by Bob's Red Mill at a local Meijer store. You can use it to make pasta and as part of the flour for pizza dough.


If you want to make your own fresh pasta from scratch, you can use equal amounts of all-purpose flour and semolina. Don't use all semolina if you're making the dough with eggs or the dough will be too tough to handle. And, because of its coarse texture, semolina is used to dust the work surface to prevent the dough from sticking.


To make basic pasta dough, here's a recipe from "Lidia's Family Table" by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich (Knopf, $30): Combine 2 cups all-purpose flour (or substitute 1 cup semolina for 1 cup all-purpose) in a bowl.


Mix together 2 large whole eggs, 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil and 3 tablespoons water.


Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture and mix with a fork until the flour is moistened and starts to come together. Continue mixing until the dough forms, then knead the dough about 3 minutes on a work surface dusted lightly with flour.


Form the dough into a disk, wrap it in plastic wrap and allow it to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. Then roll out the dough by hand or use a pasta machine to create the desired shape. The dough will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for one day, or in the freezer for a month.


Defrost the dough in the refrigerator and bring it to room temperature before rolling.



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Offline Randy

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2005, 01:32:07 PM »
On my NY/American style pizza I mix equal parts of flour, white cornmeal and Semolina to use as the shapping mixture.  Before shaping I heavly coat the dough ball and surface with the mixture then work into a disk. 

Randy

Offline Pizzaholic

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2005, 01:57:32 PM »
The semolina that I buy has a recipe insert for a pizza dough that I have been wanting to try. Says its the BEST pizza dough ever or something like that.
It doesnt mention an overnite rise in the fridge that most of us do. But I was going to try this sometime with some of the various methods that are gleened from this site.
I use it as peel greese and for making pasta
If and when I try the pizza dough recipe I will post my outcomes
Pizzaholic
Heading outta town for Mardi Gra and might make some pies at my friends house this weekend

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2005, 02:29:01 PM »
Last year I met a pizza operator in Massachusetts who uses semolina as part of the dough ingredients to make a NY style dough. When I asked him how much semolina he used, he said that he used the same number of scoops of the semolina as high-gluten flour. I tried one of his pizzas and the crust was excellent.

Lydia Shire, a well-known chef in the Boston area, also uses semolina, along with high-gluten flour and all-purpose flour, to make a dough for a lobster pizza that has become one of her signature dishes.

pftaylor recently provided a link to a video clip detailing a dough made by an Italian baker in Australia whose pizzas have become all the rage. I subsequently found a link, at http://www.miettas.com/food_wine_recipes/recipes/chefs_recipes/icarusi.html, to one of his dough recipes, which includes semolina.

Peter


« Last Edit: March 07, 2008, 09:10:37 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline snowdy

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2005, 05:02:00 PM »
is semolina hard to find? i went to 2 grocery stores today and there were none in sight.

 :(

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2005, 05:10:44 PM »
Snowdy,

Semolina is fairly easy to find. Many supermarkets carry it in the specialty flours section, usually adjacent to the standard flours. Places like Whole Foods and Wild Oats also carry the semolina flour in the bulk bins. And King Arthur and many others sell it via mail order and the Internet.

Peter

Offline Lydia

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2006, 10:50:48 PM »
I have developed a killer recipe using semolina flour, and Kitchen Aid, I dont use my scale so it's in standard measurements.

No ovenight rest, because it ruins the perfectly light and crispy texture.

I purchase Pendelton semolina at Cash N Carry.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


Offline Hi Gluten

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2006, 11:43:17 PM »
Hi Lydia,

I'm a fan of using semolina. Care to share your recipe?  :)


Offline Lydia

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2006, 02:37:32 PM »
Semolina looks like finely ground cornmeal. If pasta isn't made with 100% semolina, it is a noodle.

Semolina is high in protein and is high on the GI index, and therefore a GOOD carb.

« Last Edit: February 03, 2006, 02:41:11 PM by Lydia »
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2006, 02:45:53 PM »
The recipe itself isn't special, it's more of how to handle the dough. If you want it I'll sent it to you. I've been working with it for 10 years and finally got it figured out.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Fio

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2006, 03:17:57 PM »
Does anyone use Semolina?  I see it called out on occasion.  What is it used for ?

Thanks


I use it instead of cornmeal for dusting dough balls on the peel.
Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.

Offline davtrent

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2006, 04:11:41 PM »
Peter Reinhart (American Pie) adds  about 5% semolina flour to his Napoletana Pizza Dough recipe in order to make his Roman Pizza Dough.  He says he adds the semolina flour to "make it stiffer, and thus easier to stretch thinly, and to give it some extra crispness in the oven."

      Reinhart's Roman Pizza Dough

  100% unbleached All-Purpose flour
      5% semolina flour
      4% kosher salt
    69% cool water
   .06% instant yeast  (about one tsp. per 5 cups of flour)

This makes a very nice crust with a bit of "tooth" to it.  Reinhart suggests that persons wishing to use bread flour or hi-gluten flour (instead of all-purpose) add one teaspoon of olive oil per cup of flour.

Regards,

David




Offline Lydia

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2006, 08:51:13 PM »
This dough bakes quickly and evenly and has a nice oven-spring with moderate bubbles. Lightly golden with a light-n-crispy texture, not to be confused with crunchy or crackery. Not heavy on the stomach like many other doughs.



This recipe is best baked on a pizza stone preheated for 1 hour at 550F. So just crank up the standard oven as high as it will go.

2 cups warm water (110F)
2 1/8 tsp ADY
Activate yeast in water for 5 minutes, until foamy.

2 1/2 c. AP flour (I use Gold Metal AP or KA unbleached AP)
2 1/2 c. Semolina
Measure flours with dip-n-scoop method into mixing bowl and stir to combine.

1/4 c. oil (i use vegetable but olive oil is fine)
2 tsp granulated sugar
2 tsp salt
Add to the activated yeast mixture and whisk.

Using the dough hook attachment on Low speed, simultaneously whisk and slowly pour liquids into the flours. Dough should come together and pull away from sides in just a few rotations. If it doesn't add more AP flour one Tbsp at a time.

Knead dough in mixer for 6 minutes, then increase speed one notch for 3 additional minutes. Dough should be tacky not sticky.

Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover tightly in plastic for 2 hours or until doubled in bulk.
Remove and divide dough into 5 equal pieces, approx. 12 oz each and form into balls.

Working with only 1 ball at a time, on flat surface dusted with semolina, press into disc, then stretch or roll into a 9-10 inch pie. If rolling dough, sprinkle with addition semolina , as needed, to prevent sticking.

Transfer dough to semolina dusted peel or whatever you use to transfer pies to the preheated stone. Add sauce and toppings and bake for 7 1/2 minutes at 550F or closer to 10 minutes at 500F.

I cannot recommend where to place the stone in your oven. Every oven I have used has a different "ideal" location.

IMPORTANT NOTES

Form only one pizza at a time and work quickly. The longer it takes to get the pizza to the oven "after" forming, it will lose it's crispy characteristics.

The results are "fair" if baked on parchment or parchment lined pizza pans and interferes with bottom browning and crisping.

Rolling/forming dough on floured surface seems to interfere with the crispiness.

Overnight cold fermention causes dough to lose elasticity and will be more prone to tears. Crust will be slightly chewy and a bit heavier.

I can't recall how this recipes turns out using High-Gluten or Pizza Blend flour. I love the results I get from AP..... so if it ain't broke........

I make pizza on auto-pilot and hope I remembered everything. So let me know how things go with this recipe.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Hi Gluten

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2006, 09:31:42 PM »
Lydia,

Thanx for the recipe! It's nice to have a same day pizza dough.

As I was pondering your recipe, I was wondering if using shortening (instead of oil) would add another dimension to the recipe...'just a thought...

Again, thank you for the recipe and the detailed instructions.  ;D

Offline Lydia

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2006, 01:00:14 AM »
I used 24 hr. refrigerated dough and tried cold forming it.

Crust took longer to bake and was very slow to crisp on the bottom.
Interestingly the texture was both crunchy and crackery (drier) and developed a slight gummy layer.
Still had moderate bubbles.

When i bake this crust on a pizza stone placed on the charcoal grill, It takes longer, but maintains original texture.

I would be interested in the affects the shortening would have on this recipe. I haven't tried it "yet"  :)

I plan on doing more experimenting by increasing the semolina and oil.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2006, 01:09:31 AM by Lydia »
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline peckman

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2006, 03:12:42 AM »
I add a 1/4 cup of semolina to my recipe.  It does seem to add crispiness.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Semolina
« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2006, 07:01:52 PM »
I really like the semolina doughs, it's difficult to tell that anything but a regular white flour was used. IMHA the texture is just better.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


 

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