Author Topic: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style  (Read 11938 times)

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Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2010, 07:57:49 PM »
How are you guys/gals getting your pizzas out of the pan whole like that?


Offline briseman

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2010, 08:52:06 PM »
This looks like a fantastic recipe and will have to pick up some dry milk to try it out this weekend.

Question for you regarding application of sausage... do you pre-cook yours at all (either in a skillet or a par cook in microwave) or does the baking time and temp suffice for cooking the sausage?

Thanks for inspiration.

-brise

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2010, 09:04:29 PM »
You are going to want to precook it.

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2010, 09:16:54 PM »
I do precook the sausage as well.

This recipe can get bubbles under the crust so tap it down with your fingers but don't worry about getting it all out, just flatten the middle a bit and mash the top of the sides back in a bit.

Offline BTB

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #29 on: February 24, 2010, 08:13:38 AM »
Question for you regarding application of sausage... do you pre-cook yours at all (either in a skillet or a par cook in microwave) or does the baking time and temp suffice for cooking the sausage?
NONE of the great Chicago deep dish pizzerias put cooked sausage on their pizzas.  They all put uncooked sausage on, which makes for a much tastier pizza in my and many others opinion.  But it's fine if one likes it otherwise.  Deep dish pizzas cook for a longer time than other styles and the sausage gets thoroughly cooked in the process.  I generally always put uncooked sausage on Chicago style deep dish and thin crust pizzas.
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Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2010, 08:19:07 AM »
The sausage really cooks completely?  I imagined that the crust insulated the sausage too much. 

Offline loowaters

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #31 on: February 24, 2010, 08:21:29 AM »
I'm in the uncooked sausage camp as well.  It's just tastier...and it cooks up more tender for the obvious reason of not having any fat rendered out before baking the pizza.  It cooks up just fine.

Getting it out of the pan takes a few tries.  Having a pan gripper helps by allowing you give a little flip to the pie to get it up on top of the rim of the pan but a large flexible spatula words as well.  Some pizza's you just don't get out.  The Burt's/Pequod's type pie I've been working on I don't even attempt.  I just cut it in the pan.

Loo
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Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #32 on: February 24, 2010, 08:23:09 AM »
Wow this is the first I've heard of people using raw sausage.  I'll have to give it a shot.  I love this forum.  I've been learning so much in my short time reading it!!!!

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #33 on: February 24, 2010, 09:17:51 AM »
How are you guys/gals getting your pizzas out of the pan whole like that?

Biaviian,

You've hit upon the one consistent problem I have had with my deep-dish pizzas.  I traditionally used a spatula and pie server simultaneously to lift the pizza out of the pan, but this can sometimes lead to breakage.  About a month ago I tried something different.  I bought a springform pan and used that as my vessel in which I made the pizza.  The pizza came out fine, both taste-wise and intact.  I will say I think the springform pan may change the crust slightly compared to a traditional pan, but it was not a big enough difference for my family or me to be overly concerned.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #34 on: February 24, 2010, 10:58:44 AM »
One of our members, pcuezze, who just recently opened his pizza restaurant, struggled with the problem of extracting deep-dish pizzas from their pans, as he noted in his PMQ Think Tank thread at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=56143#p56143. One of the implements he found very useful is a pancake spatula, specifically, the one shown at Crate & Barrel at http://www.crateandbarrel.com/family.aspx?c=748&f=14336&q=spatula&fromLocation=Search&DIMID=400001&SearchPage=1.

Peter

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2010, 11:07:57 AM »
Thanks a lot!

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2010, 05:22:11 PM »
Thanks for the tip, Peter.  I should look into that.
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2010, 09:41:36 PM »
I do prefer the taste using raw sausage but as I posted before I try to reduce the fat at least some in practical ways without going to the extreme like turkey sausage or no sausage at all.  The other guys are certainly right about the very best flavor is with raw sausage but it is still very tasty cooked.

I use the ten inch cheapy spring-form pan most of the time but I do have a sloped sided 14" deep dish pan that is a bit easier to get out than a straight sided pan.  The spring-form of course is very easy.

Of late I have been rolling the dough out to match the bottom of the pan then pulling it up the side with my fingers.  Makes a very uniform pizza.

Randy

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #38 on: February 26, 2010, 12:46:53 PM »
I just made this with AMAZING results.  I cooked my sausage just because I was a bit concerned with using raw sausage the first time around.  I'll use raw the next time around.  I followed the directions in the OP except I rolled my dough to 10.5" prior to putting it in the pan.  I think I'll roll it to 12" the next time around so less stretching will be needed.  The dough tasted amazing and this pizza was a huge hit (it is only my wife and myself but still, it was a huge hit).  I was able to get it out of my pan without an issue.  I did use the pancake flipper that was posted a few posts above.  That was the key thing I was missing. 

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #39 on: February 26, 2010, 01:10:26 PM »
Well sure  glad it worked out for you.  It reheats really well straight from the freezer as well.

I tried rolling it out to the full diameter to let it run up the sides but that didn't work so well since you end up with folds in the sides.  I usually roll it out the bottom of the pan but I will try as you did and roll it just a bit further and try to find a compromise.

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #40 on: February 26, 2010, 01:23:55 PM »
My only issue with stretching it was I got a lot of oil spilling onto the top of the dough.  It didn't affect the final product and the dough still "stuck" to the sides of the pan.  It was just too messy.  There has to be something I can change so oil doesn't end up all over my hands.  That is a good point of the creases.  I did have air trapped under the base of the dough as I allowed it to rise.  I just made a hole in the dough, squeezed the air out, and closed the hole. 

Offline loowaters

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #41 on: February 26, 2010, 02:48:54 PM »
That's why I started using Crisco on the pan bottom.

Loo
Using pizza to expand my waistline since 1969!


Offline JConk007

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #42 on: February 26, 2010, 07:16:55 PM »
My wife still shutters, but I too use crisco in the bottom on the deep dish recipes nice golden crisp flaky  crust.
John
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Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #43 on: February 27, 2010, 01:46:25 PM »
I'll give the crisco a try.

Offline BTB

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #44 on: February 27, 2010, 03:09:11 PM »
I, too, prefer to use Crisco or some solid shortenting, but I've got a difference of opinion in my kitchen.  Most of my taste testers prefer the deep dish pizzas with olive oil on the bottom of the pan.  So go figure.  They like that semi-fried effect.

                                                                               --BTB

Offline vcb

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #45 on: February 27, 2010, 04:10:00 PM »
I, too, prefer to use Crisco or some solid shortenting, but I've got a difference of opinion in my kitchen.  Most of my taste testers prefer the deep dish pizzas with olive oil on the bottom of the pan.  So go figure.  They like that semi-fried effect.

                                                                               --BTB

I tend to avoid springform pans for deep dish.
I like the deep dish/cake pans just fine.

I usually use a combination of butter-flavored crisco, corn oil, and olive oil and only grease the bottom.

Dough comes out of the fridge for 30 minutes (or more, looks like Lou Mal lets theirs get to room temp), then I press the dough out until it gets to the edge, evening out with my palms, then bring the lip up turn a ziploc bag inside out and use it as a glove if you don't want to get your hands dirty. If you guys haven't seen the latest deep dish video link that DKM posted, check it out: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10161.60.html

You can watch Marc Malnati's technique.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2010, 04:14:00 PM by vcb »
-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
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Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #46 on: March 09, 2010, 05:40:22 PM »
I tried a teaspoon of crisco to grease the bottom of  the 10" pan.  I must say I think I lost a bit of flavor.

I cut the final dough ball down to 18 oz  from 19.3 oz and I think the thickness was just about right.

I am going to redo the recipe to make use of my 14" pan.

Here is a couple more pictures of the last pie as it rises.

Randy