Author Topic: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style  (Read 10575 times)

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Offline Randy

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Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« on: April 21, 2009, 07:53:45 AM »
Here is the final version of the recipe for a deep dish pizza I had originally labeled as Papa Del's like.  I think the name now more accurately reflects this pizza.  This is very, very good.

Randy

Deep Dish pizza
In the Chicago style
Tuesday, April 21, 2009

For a single 10 spring form pan or cake pan

6.3 oz water room temperature
1 tsp instant dry yeast
.3 oz or 1 1/2  Tablespoons Powdered Milk
11.3 oz King Arthur Bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 Tablespoon sugar
.5 oz  or 1 Tablespoon of Classico Olive oil

   In a stand mixer (KitchenAid) fitted with a dough hook, add the water, yeast and powdered milk.  Run on stir  or low speed until yeast has fully dissolved.
   Mix the remaining dry ingredients together in a separate container and add them to the mixer while still on stir speed.
   Switch to speed 2 or knead speed until most of the flour and water have mixed.
   Add oil while the dough is still scrappy then it will quickly form a moist, smooth cohesive ball.
   Knead on speed 2 for 10 minutes
   Put just enough classico olive oil in the 10" pan to make sure that the oil completely covers the bottom.
   After the dough has been kneaded for 10 minutes, remove it from the mixing bowl and press it into the pan stretching the dough with your finger tips trying not to get too much oil on the pan sides so the dough will stick better.  Press the dough in place so the sides come up about 2
   Cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rise for 2 hours on the counter then place the pan (still covered) into the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (up to 24 hours).

WHEN READY TO MAKE

   Remove dough from the refrigerator two to three hours in advance then press down the bottom of the dough with your finger tip in a random fashion then using your fingers press the dough, flatting the sides in place.
   After two or three hours, preheat oven to 450F.  Add a half pound of mozzarella to the bottom, then topping of your choice then a cup of sauce on top.
   Bake at 450 F for 20 minutes.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2009, 07:55:34 AM by Randy »


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2009, 05:58:13 PM »
Randy,

Since your dough recipes generally attract a lot of member interest, I wondered whether it was possible to run your recipe through the deep-dish dough calculating tool just in case a member asks for the quantities of ingredients to make a similar pizza but in a different size. Alas, I discovered that the deep-dish dough calculating tool (at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html) does not include nonfat dry milk powder as one of its ingredients, most likely because it is rare to find nonfat dry milk powder used in a deep-dish dough formulation. However, after playing around with the deep-dish dough calculating tool and doing some editing of the results, I was able to establish that your recipe looks as follows from a baker's percent standpoint:

Flour (100%):
Water (55.7522%):
IDY (0.94026%):
Salt (1.74225%):
Olive Oil (4.21407%):
Sugar (1.8667%):
Nonfat Dry Milk Powder* (2.01924%):
Total (166.53472%):
320.48 g  |  11.3 oz | 0.71 lbs
178.68 g  |  6.3 oz | 0.39 lbs
3.01 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
5.58 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
13.51 g | 0.48 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3 tsp | 1 tbsp
5.98 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.5 tsp | 0.5 tbsp
6.47 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 4.5 tsp | 1.5 tbsp
533.72 g | 18.83 oz | 1.18 lbs | TF = 0.141
* Carnation brand available in supermarkets
Note: For a 10" straight-sided pan with a depth of 2"; no bowl residue compensation

In the above table, I used the conversion values that I designed into the various dough calculating tools.

For those who would like to make a pizza like yours but in a different size, I suggest that they use the Dough Weight option of the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html. That tool does include nonfat dry milk powder (the supermarket Carnation's brand) as one of its ingredients. To use the expanded dough calculating tool, users should enter the baker's percents given in the above table, along with the following dough weights for the pan sizes indicated below. In all cases, the pans are straight sided and have a depth of 2", with the dough being pushed up the sides of the pan for the full 2" depth. Any other pan shape (e.g., sloping sides) or pan depth or dough depth would require different dough weights.

6" pan: 8.64 ounces
7" pan: 10.85 ounces
8" pan: 13.29 ounces
9" pan: 15.95 ounces
10" pan: 18.83 ounces (See Randy's example above)
11" pan: 21.93 ounces
12" pan: 25.25 ounces
13" pan: 28.79 ounces
14" pan: 32.56 ounces
15" pan: 36.54 ounces
16" pan: 40.75 ounces
17" pan: 45.18 ounces
18" pan: 49.83 ounces

I also normally use a bowl residue compensation to compensate for minor dough losses during preparation of the dough. For a stand mixer, I usually use a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%. For a hand kneaded dough, I suggest a bowl residue compensation of 2.5%; for a food processor or bread maker, I suggest a value of 1%.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 05, 2009, 09:55:32 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2009, 06:25:24 PM »
Thank you Peter for running that calculation.  It helps me as well if I push the recipe to a 14" pan.

This recipe is interesting to me not only for the taste but the unique character of the crust.  I have reduced the oil down to just enough to cover the bottom.  About the same as one would use for a typical Chicago deep dish pizza.

I have wondered about using 2% milk or even buttermilk.

Randy

Offline zalicious

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2009, 12:18:40 PM »
Thanks, Randy & Peter! This recipe uses about 1/2 the oil that I have been using in my deep dish. Good to know that I can cut it down to this level & still be good. I will definitely test this out on my next deep dish. :)

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2009, 01:04:18 PM »
It turned out surprisingly well.  I hope you enjoy the pizza as much as I have.

Randy

Offline dicepackage

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2009, 11:19:41 PM »
I just made this and it turned out great.  The crust was a little thick but I will try to make this again tomorrow and maybe get some pictures up.

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2009, 06:58:27 AM »
Glad you enjoyed the recipe.  The thickness is good comment and I have thought more than once of making a slight reduction but in hand shaping I worry about thin spots.  If you reduce the thickness be sure to post your results.

I was worried I might irritate our Chicago deep dish experts with this recipe.  I choose the title of the pizza with that in mind.  I hope it clearly implies this is not a traditional Chicago deep dish but is in that style.

Did you get those nifty air pockets in the outside crust?

Randy

Offline roevey

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2009, 09:28:15 PM »
Ugh. I ate too much.

I had a go at this recipe. I pretty much followed Randy's recipe, except for the overnight chill. What can I say, I'm impatient. I did a rise in the oven with hot water, panned it, and then let it rise again.

For my personal taste, it was a little too thick and I'll probably cut back some on the powdered milk. Overall, though, I was pretty happy. I was reminded of the crust at papa del's, and I'm guessing that's owed to the powdered milk.

Thanks for posting this recipe.
Raw like sushi;
Grate like cheese.

Offline zalicious

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2009, 11:31:00 PM »
Tonight I made 2 itty bitty 6" pizzas. I used the Deep Dish calculator to get the amounts that I needed using .14 TF.  As Peter had said, the calculator doesn't have powdered milk listed, so I just entered my % amount into the cornstarch field, then corrected it to powdered milk on my printout  ;). The pizzas came out great. Hubster & I enjoyed them, so I will be using this recipe again. Thanks, Randy!
« Last Edit: May 04, 2009, 11:35:38 PM by zalicious »

Offline zalicious

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2009, 11:37:08 PM »
More pics.


Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2009, 06:16:44 AM »
Well done.  Your shaping is really good.  Much better than mine.  Glad you enjoyed the pizza.  What did you think of the thickness?

Randy

Offline zalicious

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2009, 08:03:50 AM »
I thought it was a wee bit thick. On my next version , I'll try a .13 and see how it goes. Otherwise, I wouldn't change a thing. I loved this for my little pans; so easy to shape. I think my next attempt will be a breakfast version with eggs & other goodies in it.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2009, 10:13:36 AM »
Jeanette,

Nice job. Those little pizzas can come in handy at times, and allows you to satisfy individual preferences more easily.

I used the same "trick" as you did with the deep-dish dough calculating tool. I thought to let others in on the trick but concluded that I would perhaps just confuse people. As you know, instead I did the calculations of dough weights for different size pans for use in the expanded dough calculating tool, which would perhaps result in fewer errors.

I never expected anyone to use a 6" pan. Because you did, I went back to the earlier post and added the dough weight for the 6" pan application. While I was at it, I added the dough weights for a 17" pan and an 18" pan.

While I had everything in front of me, I came up with the following dough formulation for your 6" pan but using a thickness factor of 0.13. This is what the dough formulation looks like:

Flour (100%):
Water (55.7522%):
IDY (0.94026%):
Salt (1.74225%):
Olive Oil (4.21407%):
Sugar (1.8667%):
Nonfat Dry Milk Powder* (2.01924%):
Total (166.53472%):
135.57 g  |  4.78 oz | 0.3 lbs
75.59 g  |  2.67 oz | 0.17 lbs
1.27 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.42 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
2.36 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.42 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
5.71 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.27 tsp | 0.42 tbsp
2.53 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.63 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
2.74 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.9 tsp | 0.64 tbsp
225.78 g | 7.96 oz | 0.5 lbs | TF = 0.13
*Carnation brand available in supermarkets
Note: For a 6" straight-sided pan with a depth of 2"; no bowl residue compensation

Peter


Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2009, 01:52:57 PM »
That seems to be a consensus on slightly reducing the thickness.  A breakfast pizza now there is a good thought. 

I do appreciate too the reduction in the amount of oil used comparatively speaking with a typical Chicago deep dish recipe albeit a modest reduction in fat compared to the sausage I put on my pizza.

By the way when I made this dough in the morning and used it that evening, I saw no flavor loss when comparing to the overnight rise I had made before

I have a thin crust on the counter for tonight so I will have to wait a bit to try the reduction in thickness.

.

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2009, 02:40:15 PM »
Here is a 14" version.  Shaping this is very easy.  First you roll it out to the size of the bottom of your pan then place that in the pan.  Let it rise for two hours then tap down the center with your finger tips then press the dough to make the sides.
I have lowed the baking temperature to 425F.

I used the .13 thickness factor as Peter and others had suggested and it was just about right.

« Last Edit: July 22, 2009, 02:53:03 PM by Randy »

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2009, 09:45:27 AM »
I gave this a try following the original posted recipe in a 12" slope sided black iron frying pan for 20 min at 425.  About an hour and a half in the pan, spread on the bottom and covered in the hot non air conditioned garage, finger punched down and spread up the sides, then another half hour and into the oven.  While not the traditional biscuity Chicago crust and still a bit thick, it was quite excellent IMHO!  Nice thin crisp on the outside and a soft interior with that type of texture that seems both moist and dry at the same time which I really like and have never experienced in a pizza before.  Very enjoyable flavor too, it was also a hit with my guests.  I also appreciate the minimal amount of oil used.  No pics but looked a lot like roevey's, more on the golden than brown side. 
The texture puts this pie into a unique classification for me and I just hope it comes out the same way the next time I make it, which will be soon. 
Thanks, Randy!
 

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2009, 11:09:46 AM »
I am glad you enjoyed the pizza.  It is one our favorites as well.

A lot of credit for this recipe should got to xPHmg and his pizza hut recipe that I converted to a Chicago style and cut way back on the oil.

It is a very consistent recipe so it should come out the same next time.

Randy

Offline BurntEdges

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2009, 12:05:45 PM »
Looks very nice Randy,... -   2 Q's:

Is this baked on a stone or directly on the wire oven shelf?

Generally, what position in the oven (shelf height) works best for this?

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2009, 12:21:03 PM »
As it so happens I have one in the fridge for tonight.

On the wire rack using the bottom position.

This is a work in progress so if try something different be sure and post your results and thoughts.

Tonight's pizza has a minimal of oil in the pan to see how that works.  I used a paper towel to wipe the bottom(not the sides) with olive oil.  In addition I am using  Raw Sugar in the recipe I will post results tomorrow.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: Deep Dish Pizza in the Chicago Style
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2009, 04:07:37 PM »
I have another thought on this pizza.  I am thinking this pizza could be taken straight from the fridge, prepped and baked since the shaping has already been done.  I have posted to remove it from the fridge two or three hours in advance but I question my own instruction now that I look at tonight's pizza in the fridge.  Other than baking with a chilled dough and therefore affecting baking time I see no reason why I should take it out any earlier than time for the oven to preheat and the pie to be filled with toppings.

Randy


 

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