Author Topic: relatively Quick, mortarless, low budget simple oven like this one... help?  (Read 11069 times)

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Offline zer0vette

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I was checking out the fornobravo site and found this ..

Anyone have any ideas how the roof is held up on something like this.  I can't visualize it at all.  The poster says he used angle iron, but i don't get how that would work.  Any ideas?  I'd really like to build something simple like this, but i just can't figure out how the roof will work out without mortar.

Thanks




Offline widespreadpizza

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zerovette,  They must have used several pieces of angle iron for the first roof layer.  one lipped in and one lipped ot with a row of bricks on it and then repeated ,  three or four times.  Looking at  the bottom layer of the roof from the side,  L---_IL---_IL---_IL---_I can you see what I mean here with the dashes representing suspended bricks?  Then they just layered on top of it.  I see  many many problems with that design working right.  Too many to list.  I would highly doubt that it would be worth the investment,  but to each his own.  A 2 stone would do a much better job.  -marc

Offline zer0vette

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Well it turns out that the person who built that is still around on the fornobravo forums. He said it works great.  I'm going to try it. i figure it should work o.k for what it is.  I'm moving out of my house in 1-2 years so i figure no use investing in a large oven build that will be a fixture and left behind.  Also i'm thinking i can reuse the firebricks and clay bricks that i use to build this one to build my permanent oven when i move to my new home.  We'll see what happens..

Offline widespreadpizza

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Zerovette,  if you do try it,  let us know how it works,  I am curious.  If yopu have the link of the thread over at the forno site,  I would be interested in checking it out.  didn't mean to be too negative.  -marc

Offline zer0vette

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Here is the link to the build on fornobravo.

fornobravo.com/forum/f21/foundation-first-pizza-4-1-2-a-6653.html#post54492

I did build one very similar to this last weekend and it turned out pretty good. i did a few things differently though. I used full firebricks instead of splits for more thermal mass. I used firebricks for the roof to possibly help with heat retention and to prevent little pieces of clay from cracking off onto my pizzas. I also modified the dimensions a bit for more cooking space.  The pizza i cooked in it last weekend was quite delicious, noticeably different from the conventional oven.

and.. here are the results.....

pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8528.new.html#new

« Last Edit: May 07, 2009, 12:03:54 PM by zer0vette »

Offline TONY

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Zerovette,

What temperature were you able to reach?

Offline zer0vette

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I used a meat thermometer and the floor was easily 500+.  I don't think i used enough wood, and i think i need to work on my oven firing. The pizza cooked in about 3-4 minutes.

I bought an IR thermometer yesterday, so this weekend, with good weather, i'll be able to get some accurate temperature readings. 

Offline TONY

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Zerovette,

How were you able to support the roof bricks??

TOny

Offline zer0vette

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angle iron was used and then bricks stacked across.  check out the original at the fornobravo.  Also here is a link that shows pictures of the 1st guy who built one like this..

fornobravo.com/forum/f21/foundation-first-pizza-4-1-2-a-6653.html#post54492

s557.photobucket.com/albums/ss14/timmyny_2009/brick%20oven/?start=all


Offline Randy

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I had proposed building one of these several  years ago.  i think there might be a thread on this but not sure.  But anyway these guys did it so good for them.  Here is my blog that has pictures of my barbecue pit that I built several years ago using the same stacking technique.  Look on the left hand side.  I have used for years.

http://hotdogschilisandsauces.blogspot.com/

not all firebricks are not the same so go look at them at your building supply place before you do your planing.  measure them as close as practical.

Buy your bricks at one time and from the same stack if possible due to size variations.  Even with my truck bricks weigh a ton so if you put them in you car watch the weight.

Randy


Offline Davydd

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Here is a photo of a mortar-less brick oven using a little over 400 bricks and stacking them to form an arch without need for angle iron.
Davydd

Offline Corbs

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That looks a wee bit precarious!

Offline Mike in Ypsi

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Here is a photo of a mortar-less brick oven using a little over 400 bricks and stacking them to form an arch without need for angle iron.

Wow, I've been looking at this for a half hour now, and I can't figure out why the roof doesn't collapse.  Anyone have any ideas?  Do you know where this picture came from, Davydd?

Offline carbon

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Wow, I've been looking at this for a half hour now, and I can't figure out why the roof doesn't collapse.  Anyone have any ideas?  Do you know where this picture came from, Davydd?

Erect an arch out of bricks without mortar and it'll stay put.

Offline sear

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Erect an arch out of bricks without mortar and it'll stay put.

as long as no one sits on the top  ;)

Offline Mike in Ypsi

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Erect an arch out of bricks without mortar and it'll stay put.

For sure, but I can't tell that that's what is going on here.  Is that arch that we see on the front face continuing all the way back, making 8 consecutive arches?  Or is the entire oven wall and ceiling just 1 brick thick?  It seems like if that arch went all the way back, all the bricks on the upper left and right corners would be unnecessary for structure and just be a whole lot of extra thermal mass to heat up.

Offline Tscarborough

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It is consecutive arches.  The reason it is squared off is to provide enough mass to hold the arch.  Other than the excess mass, that oven probably performs well, and if they use it 2 or 3 times a week the extra mass is good, not bad.  It still needs something over it to insulate it, and a stepped down opening though.

Offline azpizzanut

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Re: relatively Quick, mortarless, low budget simple oven like this one... help?
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2010, 03:00:07 PM »
Hi All,

I recently did a Google search on "dry stacked pizza oven". There were several interesting designs.

A person with a little ingenuity could buy a bag of castable refractory (not insulating type) and make stringers to bridge the critical area. The form would be of the same with and thickness as a brick but longer, to suit. If you try this -do not- use reinforcing metal inside the brick since the rate of expansion for commonly available reinforcement metal is greater than the refractory. The blocks will crack. High strength castable refractory sometimes comes with stainless steel needles which add strength.

There are many manufacturers of castable refractory and each seems to have six or eight different products depending on the end use. I'd go for a one that has good strength since it will be supporting bricks from above. An option would be to cast a simple roof slab and lay it atop the dry stacked sides. I thought of making a semi-permanent dry stacked pizza oven and covering it with a layer of perlcrete for insulation. The insulation could easily be removed at a later time if it wasn't mixed with too much portland cement.

Look for castable refractory cement at a building supply (Not Lowe's or Home Depot), Kiln supply or possibly a welding supply, since metal workers often build simple forges for home use.

The pizza and bread baked in one of the dry stacked ovens looked good. The concept proves you certainly don't need a $4000 pizza oven or huge, domed, masonry, piece of art, to make pizza and bread.

Cheers,


Offline alconnell

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Can you use concrete bricks for this?  I have searched around and can't find the answer.  Some of the pics shown appear to be concrete, but alot of the directions specify clay bricks.

Offline azpizzanut

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Hello Alconnell,

Cement blocks decompose with repeated heating. Don't use them anywhere flames will touch them. Cement eventually breaks down when heated to the temperatures of raging campfires or a wood fired oven. Somewhere on the internet I saw a photo of a well used fire-pit made with cement paver blocks. Those exposed to direct flames were really beat and chipped from the fire. Imagine that grit getting into your food. :( 

Cheers,


 

pizzapan