Author Topic: Sweet Italian Sausage  (Read 18004 times)

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Offline Jackitup

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #50 on: April 29, 2009, 11:00:34 PM »
I agree, pork shoulder is the best for sausage grinding. I've made thousands of pounds of sausage over the years and I've always used shoulder. The term butt or boston butt comes from the fact that the roast is the 'butt' part of the shoulder muscle. Great bang for your buck too. Can usually find them for a around a dollar a pound or so and only a small blade bone in them.
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain


parallei

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #51 on: April 29, 2009, 11:10:00 PM »
Jackitup:

Yeah, pork butt/shoulder is the way to go.  One needs that FAT!  On the other hand, I once had a kosher goose sausage in Italy that was pretty darn good. I tried making goose sausage with wild Canada geese breasts once.  Not good.  I guess I'm pretty off topic now, so I'll go away....

Offline mmarston

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #52 on: April 30, 2009, 08:04:43 AM »
In Umbria they make many different types of fresh and dry sausage from wild boar. Some of best sausages I've ever had IMO. I suspect they may sometimes add fat to the Boar as it's very lean. The old town of Norcia feels like it has more pork stores than Brooklyn. The pork products and stores from the area are sometimes called Norcineria.

Michael
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Offline tdeane

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #53 on: April 30, 2009, 12:41:49 PM »
I suspect they may sometimes add fat to the Boar as it's very lean.
I've seen several good looking Italian sausage recipes that use ground pork shoulder and fat back. Seems like a lot of fat but I'm sure that those delicious sausage and pepper sandwhiches I ate by the dozen, had more fat in them than the sausage I make does. I've been thinking about adding it to my recipe but only when I get a sausage stuffer.

Offline mmarston

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #54 on: April 30, 2009, 12:56:23 PM »
Jackitup:

Yeah, pork butt/shoulder is the way to go.  One needs that FAT!  On the other hand, I once had a kosher goose sausage in Italy that was pretty darn good. I tried making goose sausage with wild Canada geese breasts once.  Not good.  I guess I'm pretty off topic now, so I'll go away....

I've found the flavor of wild Geese depends a great deal on what they have been eating.
Geese shot on salt water often do not taste very good.
Nobody cares if you can't dance well.  Just get up and dance.  Dave Barry

Offline apizza

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #55 on: April 30, 2009, 02:46:05 PM »
[.  The missing step was the hanging of the sausage in the unused coal room down in the basement. 
Aw, memories.  Now I'm getting misty.
Chiudere la luce,
Hog
[/quote]

PizzaHog, was anything done to the sausage before it was hung to prevent spoiling? Salted? ...Etc?

Offline jeff v

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #56 on: May 01, 2009, 10:31:31 PM »
loo,

I use 3T of salt for 5 lbs of meat. The meat consists of 4-4.5lbs pork shoulder, and I usually add some pork fat to get to 5 lbs depending how lean it is. I would also suggest seasoning after you cut into chunks before you grind, then chill the chunks well for a few hours if you can before grinding.

Hope this helps,

Jeff

P.S. Keep everything very cold!
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #57 on: May 01, 2009, 11:16:26 PM »
[.  The missing step was the hanging of the sausage in the unused coal room down in the basement. 
Aw, memories.  Now I'm getting misty.
Chiudere la luce,
Hog


PizzaHog, was anything done to the sausage before it was hung to prevent spoiling? Salted? ...Etc?

Not that anyone could recall, unfortunately, so Mom never tried it.  That may explain the high level of salt? 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #58 on: May 08, 2009, 10:57:57 AM »
FWIW, I found an article today on making sausage, at the Pizza Today website at http://viewer.zmags.com/showmag.php?magid=164857#/page36/.

Peter


Offline November

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Re: Sweet Italian Sausage
« Reply #59 on: May 08, 2009, 11:31:32 AM »
FWIW, I found an article today on making sausage, at the Pizza Today website at http://viewer.zmags.com/showmag.php?magid=164857#/page36/.

I thought the pizza in the left-hand side Fontanini ad of the opening page (36) looked interesting with having sausage chunks the size of pecans.  Their three options: 1) salt, pepper, and fennel; 2) salt, pepper, fennel, and garlic; 3) salt, 3 types of pepper, garlic, and fennel; are as basic as it gets.  I'd like to know what their "3 types of pepper" are.  I can imagine red chili pepper and black/white pepper, but unless the third is bell pepper I haven't got a proper guess on that one.


 

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