Author Topic: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"  (Read 13047 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« on: May 01, 2009, 11:50:59 AM »
The May Challenge is Specialty pizzas, often called Gourmet pizzas. These are the types of pizzas that many pizza operators offer to their customers who want something beyond a basic, pepperoni, sausage or veggie pizza. It is also a creative outlet for pizza operators. So, feel free to exercise your creative juices :chef:.

Peter


Offline DKM

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2009, 06:10:46 PM »
I have an idea for this one, I just need to find a camera
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2009, 07:21:50 PM »
I actually did make my entry yesterday, but was entertaining and just didn't find the opportunity to take any photos. It was a cheesesteak pizza, not at all a Philly cheesesteak:

House-smoked mozzarella
Rib-eye steak grilled at 900F in the wood-fired oven, thinly sliced
Sautéed mushrooms (portobellos, button, and porcini)
Caramelized onion jam
Shredded scallion garnish
Neapolitan-style crust

Truth be told, I think I prefer more pedestrian toppings.

Bill/SFNM

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2009, 07:48:22 PM »
The photos below show my contribution to this month’s challenge. The pizza shown is a crawfish and andouille pizza. The idea came from John Folse’s crawfish and tasso pizza as described at his website at http://www.jfolse.com/recipes/seafood/crawfish25.htm. For those who do not know, John Folse is a well known restaurateur/chef/TV celebrity/cookbook author/businessman specializing in Cajun/Creole cooking. Less well known is that he is a cousin of our member 007bond-jb, who also lives in Louisiana.

Crawfish is available fresh in the Dallas area this time of year and my plan originally was to use the fresh product. However, when I was told by the fishmonger at the store where I planned to purchase the crawfish that it would take nine pounds of crawfish to get one pound of meat, or roughly $27 worth of crawfish, I decided to use the frozen crawfish instead. I could not find any tasso, which I am very fond of, so I substituted andouille sausage for the tasso. That was fine since I am also a big fan of andouille sausage.

For the dough, I used the Jeffrey Steingarten dough recipe recently posted by the New York Times at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/19/magazine/19food-t-001.html?ref=magazine and reproduced on the forum at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8384.msg72404.html#msg72404. Because of the high hydration of that dough, nominally 88%, and my concern that the skin made from this dough (about 14.8 ounces of dough for a 14” pizza) might not be able to fully support all of the cheese and toppings, I decided to use only three-quarters of the crawfish called for by John Folse’s recipe. I used two links (precooked) of the andouille sausage. I decided to use about half of the amount of sauce called for by the recipe. The recipe in all other respects, including the preparation steps, was as set forth at the Folse website. The Creole seasoning I used was the Tony Cachere’s brand.

Because of my concerns about the high-hydration dough and the possibility that the skin could stick to my peel, I assembled the pizza on parchment paper on the peel. The pizza was baked on a pizza stone that had been positioned on three pieces of brick (to bring the stone closer to the bottom electric element) and preheated for about an hour at around 560-570 degrees F. It took about eight minutes for the cheese to melt and to achieve decent crust coloration. I believe the pizza could have baked even longer without ill effect. I attribute the long bake time, at least in part, to the combination of the very high hydration and the high oil content of the dough, about 10%. The dough was unlike any that I had tried before. However, both the pizza and the crust itself were very good. The crust was chewy and crispy with a rim that was cracker-like in parts. The flavor of the crust was very good. Overall, I thought the pizza was excellent.

For those who are interested, I converted the NYT dough recipe to baker's percent format, for one 14" pizza. In my case, I used Morton's Kosher salt in lieu of the Diamond Crystal Kosher salt. The conversions were made using November's Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/, using the "Medium" Measurement Method. The dough formulation I ended up with, using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, was as follows:

Flour Blend* (100%):
Water (88.0929%):
ADY (0.70372%):
Salt-Morton's Kosher (1.89895%):
Olive Oil (10.0533%):
Total (200.74887%):
201.43 g  |  7.11 oz | 0.44 lbs
177.44 g  |  6.26 oz | 0.39 lbs
1.42 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.37 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
3.83 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.8 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
20.25 g | 0.71 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.5 tsp | 1.5 tbsp
404.36 g | 14.26 oz | 0.89 lbs | TF = N/A
* The Flour Blend comprises 98.81 g./3.49 oz. King Arthur all-purpose flour and 102.62 g./3.62 oz. King Arthur bread flour
Note: No bowl residue compensation

Peter
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 09:47:55 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jackitup

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2009, 12:06:54 AM »
That sounds great Peter. I was thinking the other day about a walleye pie with a white sauce base of some sort. When I make it I'll post the results. White Walleye Pizza Pie, even has a nice ring to it ;-)
jon
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Offline fazzari

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2009, 11:03:35 PM »
Here is my humble entry into the gourmet pizza realm.  Although it isn't that wacky, it is a little different.
This is a tribute to Bill/SFNM.  I finally took the time to try your recipe and your methods and I finally understand how really wonderful a hot baked dough can be.  What I made was a pizza topped with a mustard sauce (mayo, mustard, black pepper...because my wife won't eat tomato sauce), rotisserie chicken, beautiful red bell pepper and sliced onion and topped with a sprinkling of low moisture mozzarella as well as a sprinkling of pecorino cheese with chili peppers (the pecorino with chili is amazing).
The dough is made with a Roma 00 flour.  The pizza was cooked in a 2 stone oven at about 725 degrees.
As an aside...I baked a pizza (same dough recipe)in my home oven at about 600 degrees, and although it took longer, it browned nicely and was very tasty

Thanks Bill

John

Offline DKM

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2009, 06:18:14 PM »
Sorry no pictures.

Mine is an upgrade of the Bacan, Ham, and Chedder from Pizza Inn.

User my thin crust recipe for the base.

Brown mustard for the "sauce"

A light layer of a 50/50 mix of provolone and medium chedder.

Sliced prosciutto and chopped up crispy fried bacon.

Top with a little more of the cheese mix.

Yum
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2009, 11:46:05 AM »
For some time, I had been wanting to make a “mac-and-cheese” pizza. My original thought was to make a basic mac-and-cheese pizza as I had seen on several occasions in pizza shops in New York City. However, for purposes of this month’s Challenge, I decided to make a fancier version. In lieu of using an orange cheddar cheese blend of some sort, I decided to use a combination of low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese, NY sharp white cheddar cheese, Asiago cheese and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. I diced all of these cheeses in my food processor and then used them to make a cheese sauce. The sauce was made by making a basic roux of butter and flour and adding half-and-half, the four cheeses, salt and white pepper. The pasta I used was elbow macaroni. I cooked the macaroni to just less than al dente--since it would cook further on the pizza--and added it to the sauce. I set the pasta aside to cool until I was ready to make the pizza. For the dough, I decided to use a Papa Gino’s clone dough along the lines discussed at Reply 79 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8167.msg71404.html#msg71404. The version of that dough that I made included 25% semolina flour as part of the flour blend. I thought that that dough would work well with pasta because it would bake up without a lot of crust coloration, much as I had witnessed with the NYC mac-and-cheese pizzas, yet be nice and chewy.

When time came to make the pizza, I decided to get a bit fancy and make four different pasta combinations on the same pizza. I did this by taking two thin strips of dough and putting them crosswise on the pizza to form four equal quadrants. I then put a different pasta combination in each quadrant. As a take on the Quattro Stagione, I called the pizza Quattro Maccheroni. The four combinations I selected were pasta with broccoli and chicken (rotisserie), pasta and ham (diced), pasta and hot sausage, and pasta and salmon (fresh Norwegian). In terms of the actual assembly of the pizza, I distributed a diced blend of the same four cheeses over the skin, which had been stretched out to 15” on a 16” pizza screen, and then spread the previously sauced pasta over the entire skin in a single layer. I then placed the two dough strips crosswise on the pizza, and added the individual meat/vegetable/fish components to the different quadrants. I ended up distributing some more of the diced four-cheese blend over the entire pizza. The pizza was baked on a pizza stone that has been placed on the lowest oven rack position and preheated for about an hour at 475 degrees F. This pizza took longer to bake than my previous PG clone pizzas (the unbaked pizza weighed a bit over 41 ounces). It took about ten minutes on the stone, followed by about 1-2 minutes on the top oven rack position to get added top crust coloration and to help brown the cheeses a bit more.

The photos below show the finished Quattro Maccheroni pizza. Overall, I thought that the pizza turned out quite well. I sampled each of the four combinations and, while I liked them all, I found that my favorite was the pasta and ham combination. I also liked the broccoli component of the pizza. I even took some leftover broccoli and added it to a thin slice of the pasta and ham combination and reheated it on the stone. That was also a nice combination in my opinion. As I expected, the crust was nice and chewy, no doubt because of all of the semolina flour, and had a nice flavor. I also concluded that making only a macaroni and cheese pizza all by itself would be a good version. However, for such a pizza, it is important that the cheeses used for the sauce and for use on the pizza just before baking impart a lot of flavor to the otherwise neutral and bland flavor of the pasta itself. I estimate that it takes about a third of a pound of dry macaroni for a 14”-15” pizza. That is for a single layer of the pasta on the pizza. However, I concluded that using about a layer and a half of the cooked pasta is likely to be optimum, rather than the single layer I used. Otherwise, the presence of the pasta can be subjugated to the other toppings. I also suggest that the pasta be cooked more al dente than normal since the pasta will also cook when added to the sauce and during the baking of the pizza itself. I think it is better for the pasta to be firm rather than soft.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2009, 11:51:22 AM »
Slices of sausage, broccoli/chicken, and salmon, respectively.

Peter

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2009, 11:55:24 AM »
Slices of ham and ham/broccoli.

Peter


Offline November

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2009, 11:58:44 AM »
Peter,

For some time, I had been wanting to make a “mac-and-cheese” pizza.


Domino's Bread Bowl Pasta
http://www.dominos.com/home/index.jsp

So I guess in your case it's "Bread Plate Pasta."

- red.november

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2009, 12:00:11 PM »
This photo shows a sliver (on edge) of the pizza under one of the cross dough pieces, without any toppings. The taste of this sliver told me that it is possible to make a decent tasting pizza using only pasta without any toppings, so long as the cheeses have a lot of flavor to impart to the pasta.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2009, 12:05:16 PM »
Domino's Bread Bowl Pasta
http://www.dominos.com/home/index.jsp



November,

When I was contemplating different combinations, I actually went to the Domino's website since I had seen the announcements of their new pasta offerings. I had also researched pizzas using pasta that various pizza places were offering. I found that ziti and penne pasta are popular choices.

Peter

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2009, 02:22:40 PM »
Peter,
looks great!
I would take your beautiful creation (Plate or Bowl) over Dominos any day!!
I am also considering the quattro after view the recent posts on the guy with the WFO and loves olive oil
I have to find that post and link again. Mac and Cheese and Meat Loaf are 2 of my favorite comfort foods!
Matter O fact I just made meatloaf yesterday and have 2 full ones leftover? HMMM , The wheels are turning now!
NICE JOB!
John
« Last Edit: May 11, 2009, 02:28:46 PM by JConk007 »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2009, 02:35:51 PM »
John,

I think the thread you have in mind is the recent Jamie Oliver thread with videol links at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8463.msg73288/topicseen.html#msg73288.

Peter

Offline jeff v

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2009, 08:25:29 PM »
For some time, I had been wanting to make a “mac-and-cheese” pizza. My original thought was to make a basic mac-and-cheese pizza as I had seen on several occasions in pizza shops in New York City. However, for purposes of this month’s Challenge, I decided to make a fancier version. In lieu of using an orange cheddar cheese blend of some sort, I decided to use a combination of low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese, NY sharp white cheddar cheese, Asiago cheese and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. I diced all of these cheeses in my food processor and then used them to make a cheese sauce. The sauce was made by making a basic roux of butter and flour and adding half-and-half, the four cheeses, salt and white pepper. The pasta I used was elbow macaroni. I cooked the macaroni to just less than al dente--since it would cook further on the pizza--and added it to the sauce. I set the pasta aside to cool until I was ready to make the pizza. For the dough, I decided to use a Papa Gino’s clone dough along the lines discussed at Reply 79 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8167.msg71404.html#msg71404. The version of that dough that I made included 25% semolina flour as part of the flour blend. I thought that that dough would work well with pasta because it would bake up without a lot of crust coloration, much as I had witnessed with the NYC mac-and-cheese pizzas, yet be nice and chewy.

When time came to make the pizza, I decided to get a bit fancy and make four different pasta combinations on the same pizza. I did this by taking two thin strips of dough and putting them crosswise on the pizza to form four equal quadrants. I then put a different pasta combination in each quadrant. As a take on the Quattro Stagione, I called the pizza Quattro Maccheroni. The four combinations I selected were pasta with broccoli and chicken (rotisserie), pasta and ham (diced), pasta and hot sausage, and pasta and salmon (fresh Norwegian). In terms of the actual assembly of the pizza, I distributed a diced blend of the same four cheeses over the skin, which had been stretched out to 15” on a 16” pizza screen, and then spread the previously sauced pasta over the entire skin in a single layer. I then placed the two dough strips crosswise on the pizza, and added the individual meat/vegetable/fish components to the different quadrants. I ended up distributing some more of the diced four-cheese blend over the entire pizza. The pizza was baked on a pizza stone that has been placed on the lowest oven rack position and preheated for about an hour at 475 degrees F. This pizza took longer to bake than my previous PG clone pizzas (the unbaked pizza weighed a bit over 41 ounces). It took about ten minutes on the stone, followed by about 1-2 minutes on the top oven rack position to get added top crust coloration and to help brown the cheeses a bit more.

The photos below show the finished Quattro Maccheroni pizza. Overall, I thought that the pizza turned out quite well. I sampled each of the four combinations and, while I liked them all, I found that my favorite was the pasta and ham combination. I also liked the broccoli component of the pizza. I even took some leftover broccoli and added it to a thin slice of the pasta and ham combination and reheated it on the stone. That was also a nice combination in my opinion. As I expected, the crust was nice and chewy, no doubt because of all of the semolina flour, and had a nice flavor. I also concluded that making only a macaroni and cheese pizza all by itself would be a good version. However, for such a pizza, it is important that the cheeses used for the sauce and for use on the pizza just before baking impart a lot of flavor to the otherwise neutral and bland flavor of the pasta itself. I estimate that it takes about a third of a pound of dry macaroni for a 14”-15” pizza. That is for a single layer of the pasta on the pizza. However, I concluded that using about a layer and a half of the cooked pasta is likely to be optimum, rather than the single layer I used. Otherwise, the presence of the pasta can be subjugated to the other toppings. I also suggest that the pasta be cooked more al dente than normal since the pasta will also cook when added to the sauce and during the baking of the pizza itself. I think it is better for the pasta to be firm rather than soft.

Peter



Nice job Peter-good call with the semolina.

Jeff

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2009, 09:08:37 PM »
The photos below show my latest specialty pizza.

This time, the pizza was a Mexican styled pizza, and it was excellent. The base of the pizza was refried beans (canned El Paso) that I had thinned with water so that it was spreadable on the skin. I then added diced low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese, diced jalapeno, sliced red onion, and linguica sausage. After the pizza was baked, I added sliced grape tomatoes, shredded orange cheddar cheese and cilantro. The cheddar cheese melted into the pizza from the heat of the pizza. The idea for the pizza came from the website of Marcello's, a well-known San Francisco pizzeria of which Mike (Essen1) is a habitué.

Peter

Offline WestCountry

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2009, 04:29:36 PM »
My entry this month is for a pizza showcasing:

-Fresh chopped spinach
-Sliced cherry tomatoes
-Mozzarella cheese
-Asiago cheese
-fresh garlic and olive oil

The dough is made with:
KASL 100%
Water 62%
Salt 1%
Sugar 1%
Ischia yeast 5.5%

15 hour Room temp fermentation / 6 hour proof. Bake at 700 degrees F.

Mmmmm, Mmmmm Good!   :)
Chris

Offline JConk007

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Re: May 2009 Monthly Challenge: "Specialty (Gourmet) Pizzas"
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2009, 04:39:00 PM »
Oh Yeah!! Nice Its got my vote West!!
John
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Offline avidan

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Egg Asparagus Truffle pizza
« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2009, 02:34:11 AM »
My entry was the last pizza of the day at a recent pizza party I threw (to celebrate my successful self-clean hack). We ran out of sauce, but I had gone to the farmers market earlier in the day, and we brainstormed the finale.

It is built on a 6-day cold ferment of 62% hydrated KA base. I used an italian yeast from Ed, the sourdough king, and cooked it at 800 for about 2 minutes.

The layers are as follows:
  • First, a layer of asparagus, pan fried in truffle butter.
  • Topped with Buffalo Mozz, and Fresh Mozz
  • Then, a layer of Prosciutto
  • Last, I cracked 3 eggs on top

When I took the pizza out, I topped it with sage leaves pan fried in truffle butter.

It was amazing. The eggs were still a little runny (over easy style). The truffle came through cleanly but was not overwhelming, the asparagus was a great texture, and the proscuitto....well, its pig. and pig is good :)

That's my Egg Asparagus Truffle (E.A.T) Pizza

Thanks to the board for the inspiration, I am now an addict. This is my first post, of what I hope to be many!
« Last Edit: May 22, 2009, 02:37:45 AM by avidan »