Author Topic: Dough proofing too fast.  (Read 403 times)

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Online jvp123

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Dough proofing too fast.
« on: September 28, 2014, 10:01:21 AM »
My dough has finished proofing about 10 hours before expected.  It's expanding pretty fast.  Not sure why. Maybe temp was off or too much yeast. I can't bake for another 10 hours.  Can I just place it in the refrigerator to slow down the activity until about an hour before the bake or is it going to be over expanded no matter what?  Right now it looks to be acceptable.  If it's over proofed ultimately how will that affect things - taste, texture, baking time?
Thanks,
Jeff
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Offline mkevenson

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2014, 10:12:01 AM »
Jeff, I have experienced this situation before. Put in fridge, no problem. It will be fine. Bake as usual. I usually go about 2 hrs counter before bake.

Mark
« Last Edit: September 28, 2014, 10:13:47 AM by mkevenson »
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2014, 10:20:18 AM »
My dough has finished proofing about 10 hours before expected.  It's expanding pretty fast.  Not sure why. Maybe temp was off or too much yeast. I can't bake for another 10 hours.  Can I just place it in the refrigerator to slow down the activity until about an hour before the bake or is it going to be over expanded no matter what?  Right now it looks to be acceptable.  If it's over proofed ultimately how will that affect things - taste, texture, baking time?
Thanks,
Jeff

Going cold with it is all you can do at this point. It's going to be over proofed, but that's not the end of the world. Make and bake as you normally would. It probably won't be as pretty as normal, but it should taste great. With 10 hours to go, you could reball now. I probably wouldn't if it was me, but it is an option.
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Online jvp123

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2014, 11:17:29 AM »
Copy that - thanks guys.  I have guests coming over for a small pizza party so I was a little bummed with the curve ball.  I was thinking of pushing them down and re balling but wasn't sure what that would do either. 

I'll just leave em in the fridge - appreciate the input.

Jeff
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Offline Donjo911

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2014, 11:41:20 AM »
Jeff,
FWIW, I'd add that as a back up you may want to make a second batch of dough with the right % of yeast or culture for the time and your room temp and have a few extra balls of all-day (9-10 hour) counter dough as a back up.  I have had a situation where the over-proofed dough was unmanageable and tore while opening a couple times.  It's always good to have a back up, especially with guests coming over.  When you have time - it'd be interesting to know why or what attributed to the early overproofing. Enjoy the party/bake!
Cheers,
Don
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Online jvp123

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2014, 11:56:37 AM »
Jeff,
FWIW, I'd add that as a back up you may want to make a second batch of dough with the right % of yeast or culture for the time and your room temp and have a few extra balls of all-day (9-10 hour) counter dough as a back up.  I have had a situation where the over-proofed dough was unmanageable and tore while opening a couple times.  It's always good to have a back up, especially with guests coming over.  When you have time - it'd be interesting to know why or what attributed to the early overproofing. Enjoy the party/bake!
Cheers,
Don

Thanks Don -- I think my wine fridge was too all over the place on this one.  Its not digital so I kind of have to guess the temp. (I do have a digital thermometer in there but I sort of have to set the knob from my experience where I think 61F might be for example.  I set it on day one and when I woke up the next morning it had been at 56F all night!  To balance I moved the knob higher.  This morning it had been at 65 too long i think and it was proofing fast.  I don't normally have those big fluctuations.  This was an odd one.  I'll include some pics.  Not sure i can make all new dough.  Gonna have to just go with it.  Its not that bad I don't think I just down think it should go much further.  They are in the fridge now.

The glass container one (yellow lid) is the most blown out (not sure why) all my others are in plastic and are less blown out like the other pic.

Jeff

Online jvp123

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2014, 11:32:13 AM »
Had the party last night.  Pies turned out very good and the dough was fine.  I think I am gonna let my future doughs proof a bit more visually than I previously thought was correct.
My reference was Craig's NP photos of his proofed dough, and, maybe for the style I'm making which is more in the NY world, a little more development in the dough is a good thing. 
I did 63% hydration and the dough was kinda hard to work with - it was sticking to my bench (not sure if i got it a little wet or if the dough was just very hydrated).  But the taste results were great.  Everyone "loved the crust."  It had a nice crunch and chew to it.
The slices didn't fold like last week's - I need to analyze the differences in the dough etc to figure out why this were stiffer.  I do like a bit of bend without an all out flop!  :-D  I did cook these even lower heat and longer.  Like 535F for 8 mins!  Perhaps that longer duration makes the pie crispier and stiffer?  I didn't burn at all - just a nice brown color with a crunch.


Didn't have time for a lot of pics but here a few taken before the mad dash to get everyone fed  ...


Jeff

Offline Donjo911

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2014, 12:23:47 PM »
Jeff,
Great looking pizzas and pictures! So glad that everything worked out!  Your pics have a nice Food Network production value to them!  Always they pro, you are! When you open up your dough ball is it a room temp or a little bit cooler? I find that it's a little easier to work with a about room temp but not warm dough. In case that helps.
Cheers,
Don

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Online jvp123

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2014, 12:37:38 PM »
Jeff,
Great looking pizzas and pictures! So glad that everything worked out!  Your pics have a nice Food Network production value to them!  Always they pro, you are! When you open up your dough ball is it a room temp or a little bit cooler? I find that it's a little easier to work with a about room temp but not warm dough. In case that helps.
Cheers,
Don

Thanks Don!  I'm just chasing you guys.  :D   Not joking one bit.  You guys inspire me to get better at this.

To answer your question  :-D  I usually open at room temp to a bit warm on the warm side.  They always open pretty easily.  I think my board got a little damp or something or the dough was very hydrated because i needed much more flour than I normally need to keep it from sticking.  It stuck several times and had to keep flouring underneath so I'd be able to slide it onto my peel.
Jeff

Offline Donjo911

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2014, 12:44:10 PM »
Thanks Jeff!  You gotta pick up some rice flour as ChicagoBob recommended.  It's so light! Vastly different from how pizza slides off a peel with flour or fine cornmeal/semolina.  You should be able to find it all over LA. I got mine at a Asian grocery but in LA (like when I was in OC) you may find it at Ralph's or general grocery. That should help!

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Online jvp123

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2014, 12:47:05 PM »
Thanks Jeff!  You gotta pick up some rice flour as ChicagoBob recommended.  It's so light! Vastly different from how pizza slides off a peel with flour or fine cornmeal/semolina.  You should be able to find it all over LA. I got mine at a Asian grocery but in LA (like when I was in OC) you may find it at Ralph's or general grocery. That should help!

Will do - I'll get some thanks!
Jeff

Online JD

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2014, 01:51:22 PM »
I need to analyze the differences in the dough etc to figure out why this were stiffer.  I do like a bit of bend without an all out flop!  :-D  I did cook these even lower heat and longer.  Like 535F for 8 mins!  Perhaps that longer duration makes the pie crispier and stiffer?  I didn't burn at all - just a nice brown color with a crunch.

You answered your own question  :)  I'd put all your focus on getting your temp & time dialed in while maintaining the same formula. You probably want to shoot for 5-6 minutes to get what you're looking for. 

The pizza looks really good from where I'm sitting at least.

Online jvp123

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Re: Dough proofing too fast.
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2014, 02:30:37 PM »
You answered your own question  :)  I'd put all your focus on getting your temp & time dialed in while maintaining the same formula. You probably want to shoot for 5-6 minutes to get what you're looking for. 

The pizza looks really good from where I'm sitting at least.

Yeah I'm going overboard the other direction JD.  I was having disastrous results trying two minute bakes at 850 +.  Just burnt the heck out of em and still doughy and gross.  I started realizing if i lowered the temp and cooked longer they came out better.  Just went too far. Thanks so much for chiming in.  Much appreciated.
Jeff


 

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