Author Topic: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle  (Read 15806 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline pacoast

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 236
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2009, 02:20:58 AM »
I would imagine that the folks at Serious Pie will reveal the source of their rocker cutters for those who might like to buy a cutter such as theirs.

That's a good idea. I had already tried calling them at a slow time of the evening & asked.. but the fellow who picked up the phone didn't know (or didn't want to tell me). Probably he didn't know off the top of his head. Serious Pie is a two hour drive for me, but the next time I am in Seattle I will try their pizza in person and see if I can find out where they buy their pizza knife.

Thanks to those who suggested similar knifes..
burnt fingers, that Mezza Luna looks like it has a quality blade on it, but the two knob handle design isn't my favourite configuration.
David, that ebay one is pretty close to what Serious pie is using & great price. But just a couple inches too short to carve an 18" NY pie with or I'd be trying to buy one.


Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468

Offline pacoast

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 236
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #27 on: July 22, 2009, 04:00:02 PM »
Thanks S00da. That is the one I'll buy if I can't find the same one that Serious Pie uses. The SP one still seems to have a more substantial handle, but the one you found is a good alternative.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23193
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #28 on: July 22, 2009, 07:52:28 PM »
For more choices and pricing possibilities, see http://www.thefind.com/query.php?query=pizza+rocker+knife#page=1&local=0.

Peter

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2009, 05:12:22 AM »
How about one of those  ;D

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23193
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #30 on: July 31, 2009, 10:03:01 PM »
I sent Tom Douglas an email via the Serious Pie website and asked Tom where I could get a rocker knife such as shown in the video. I received a reply tonight and here is his answer:

The knives are homemade! 

That perhaps explains why I couldn't find anything really close to the Serious Pie rocker knife.

Peter

Offline s00da

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 468
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2009, 01:05:05 AM »

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23193
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2009, 06:35:51 AM »
Saad,

I agree. If you click on the Lloyd link at http://www.lloydpans.com/C-1000038/All+Steel+Rocker+Knives that says "How do you use a rocker knife", you will see yet another large rocker knife, albeit one that apparently is not sold by Lloyd Pans. I still like the Serious Pie model the best, because of its size and the use of wood.

Peter




Offline pacoast

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 236
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2009, 06:02:26 PM »
Thanks for asking about the Serious pie knife. I will be there in the next week or so and will see if I can find out any additional details.

I think homemade would refer only to the wood handle. But the blade is surely a commercial item, unless they have a knife maker on staff.. which would be rather unusual. One could make a similar rocker knife with a different blade too, as long as it was of similar size and most importantly, has a flat tang or some suitable point that a wooden handle could be attached.

.


Offline pacoast

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 236
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2009, 10:30:21 PM »
The closest off the shelf rocker knife to the Serious pie one, seems to be this American Metalcraft rocker. About $40 depending on where you buy it. I think that by replacing the two small handles with a single, long wooden one should end up with a rocker knife that is almost the same dimensions & ergonomics as the the Serious pie one.

The stock handles should come off if the handle rivets are drilled out. Then one would need a piece of hardwood about 2 x 3 x 58cm with a slot cut in it as a replacement handle. With a 20" blade, this rocker knife should work for the occasional 18" NY pie that comes out of my oven, as well as the normal 12" ones that I make. Or so goes the plan.

.

Offline bluesalt

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #35 on: August 27, 2009, 02:25:13 AM »
Rocker knife makes a straight line every time. More importantly, you can see exactly where the cut will go before you make it. I'm cutting pies more evenly after 4 days of using a rocker knife than I was at 4 months of using a wheel. Really helpful if you are selling pizza by the slice.

Offline Jack

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 404
  • Location: WA
  • Pizza; it's what's for dinner, breakfast........
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #36 on: August 28, 2009, 04:14:00 PM »
Costco's Business Benter (Fife, WA) has rocker pizza knives for under $30.  Others may have them, or they may be available through Costco.com.

The business center is a bit different than the regular Costo stores.  It's smaller and is very business oriented, with far more commercial stuff.  Ours has a huge Stainless and commercial cookware section.  My wife does not like me to go there alone.  She says it's hazardous to our budget.  <evil grin>

Jack

Edit - Nope, I just checked and did not see it on Costco.com
« Last Edit: August 28, 2009, 04:17:58 PM by Jack »

Offline speedym

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #37 on: April 21, 2010, 11:16:06 PM »
Friends were there recently - they say ambiance is good, deserts are good, but, according to their taste, pizza crust is too bready, drips in oil on the bottom, and toppings are nothing special and quite scarce.

Just wanted to share their impression.


Offline sconosciuto

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 89
  • A man of extremes
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #38 on: April 23, 2010, 11:59:59 PM »
Friends were there recently - they say ambiance is good, deserts are good, but, according to their taste, pizza crust is too bready, drips in oil on the bottom, and toppings are nothing special and quite scarce.

Hearsay!  >:(  "Your honor, the above poster didn't actually experience the pizza first hand, I move to have the evidence stricken from the record!"  :P

Offline AKSteve

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 141
  • We are all made from the same dough.
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #39 on: November 09, 2010, 12:56:24 AM »
Had some of this pizza today. I was really impressed, especially with the crust. If you look at one of their pizza's, it looks like it might be kinda of tough. Then you bite into it, and it's a revelation. Very crispy on the outside, yet moist inside with just the right level of chewiness. I have no idea how to make this type of crust and I really want to find out the secret. I'm going to try to find some of the Shepherd's Grain high-gluten flour they use and do some experiments at home. I can get my home oven up to over 600 after using the calibration feature to raise the temp, so I should be able to at least cook my pie at right temperature.

Btw, if you stay at Hotel Andra a block away, you can order pizza from Serious Pie thru room service. Nice

Offline gorbachevguy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #40 on: November 09, 2010, 11:43:29 PM »

Offline AKSteve

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 141
  • We are all made from the same dough.
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2010, 07:45:22 AM »
Wow, thanks a bunch for that link. 100% hydration! I'm honestly not sure if I would be able to even handle the dough. Maybe that explains why the pizzas aren't round. It's probably impossible to form a circle without making a mess. I really don't recall watching the dough being handled and formed into a crust, so I can't say for sure if that 100% number is accurate. But, I'll give it a shot.


Offline gorbachevguy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #42 on: November 10, 2010, 10:40:53 AM »
Also, coming up this friday the 12th at 730 pm on the food network is "the best thing i ever ate"...and they are featuring pizza.  I remember watching this a while back and Tyler Florence chose Serious Pie as his favorite.  There was about a 5 minute clip about the place...but I don't recall how informative it was.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23193
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #43 on: November 10, 2010, 10:44:18 AM »
Wow, thanks a bunch for that link. 100% hydration! I'm honestly not sure if I would be able to even handle the dough. Maybe that explains why the pizzas aren't round. It's probably impossible to form a circle without making a mess. I really don't recall watching the dough being handled and formed into a crust, so I can't say for sure if that 100% number is accurate. But, I'll give it a shot.

AKSteve,

It's not entirely clear from the blog, but it is possible that the 100% hydration refers only to the poolish. It is possible to get the final dough to a hydration of 100%, but the dough will usually be hard to handle for most workers. You might want to post a question on the blog to get clarification before you proceed with a test.

Peter

Offline AKSteve

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 141
  • We are all made from the same dough.
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #44 on: November 10, 2010, 11:10:53 AM »
Looks pretty darn wet from the photos. And, quoting the blog: "Super wet dough, 100% hydration, equal parts flour and water- makes our dough soft instead of stiff." I wish I had read this earlier, as I spoke to a girl yesterday whose boyfriend works there. She did mention that their pastry chefs worked for six months to perfect the dough. Once I get back home, I'm going to use the following 95% hydration ciabatta pizza dough recipe as a starting point: http://sites.google.com/site/hollosyt/quickrusticciabattapizza. It's obviously not the same technique they use at all, but it'll give me an idea of what a pizza tastes like using a dough that wet.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2010, 11:12:24 AM by AKSteve »

Offline DenaliPete

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 289
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #45 on: April 12, 2011, 05:14:22 AM »
I recently ate here on my way back home from a trip to do some volunteer work in vietnam.  Spectacular pizza, and the same enigma that AKSteve mentions.  Very crispy outside with a great tenderness and moistness inside.  How to replicate that?  I just don't know, but I'd love to find out.

Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3093
  • Age: 44
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #46 on: April 12, 2011, 01:20:12 PM »
try a wet dough at 625 degrees or so.  The wetness keeps it moist inside and the lower temp allows the outside to get nice and crispy/charred.   This pizza seems very similar to new haven style, but even more hydrated.  
« Last Edit: April 12, 2011, 11:17:20 PM by scott r »

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #47 on: April 12, 2011, 08:12:45 PM »
I lack parchment paper so this evening I streched the dough recipe from the blog, 1 cup water and 250 grams flour, 1tsp. yeast and 7 grams salt,  into a oiled 13" pan after three S+Fs in the span of a hour and let it rise in the pan another hour. It had way to much rim, have to cut back on the amount of dough. A simple sliced plum tomato and garlic with Panela cheese which was baked for a few minutes then removed from the pan and allowed to finish on the tile in my LBE. I think a regular oven would be better. It had a quite tasty crust and a very interesting texture for an all purpose flour and a two hour rise. Thanks for posting the link to the blog, I will try this again soon with my changes.
Don
http://sites.google.com/site/hollosyt/quickrusticciabattapizza
If others are interested in trying the high hydration recipe from the blog it might be best to start a new thread.  :D
« Last Edit: April 12, 2011, 08:27:17 PM by buceriasdon »

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #48 on: April 13, 2011, 12:03:06 PM »
I went back and viewed the video (post 3) several more times and I concur with Peter's old post about the use of poolish and or biga and high hydration, but no way that skin is more than 80% hydration and I doubt even that high. Even with a heavy coating of cornmeal those pizzas are coming off those little peels way to easy.


Don

Offline fredric100

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
Re: "Serious Pie" by Tom Douglas in Seattle
« Reply #49 on: September 25, 2014, 03:25:59 PM »
More details here:

http://tossedsaladsandscrambledeggs.wordpress.com/2012/03/15/serious-pie-pizza-class-downtown-seattle/

- Three-day dough making process.

- Bread flour, semolina flour, biga starter, olive oil, honey, salt and water are mixed, proofed and hand-shaped.

- Silky and supple, the wet dough wobbled and yielded easily to touch.

658 F


 

pizzapan