Author Topic: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza  (Read 12356 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« on: May 09, 2009, 09:01:29 AM »
In another thread Pete-zza made reference to a recipe and method for a Rustic Ciabatta Pizza, and provided this link http://hollosyt.googlepages.com/quickrusticciabattapizza .  Thank you Peter.   Other forum members, including the author of this recipe, have also posted regarding this pizza.  However, I elected to start a new thread to keep the topic current.

The recipe is given by volume instead of by weight, so I made some conversions and ran it through the dough calculator.  Although a photograph caption indicated that it was a 100% hydration recipe, I used the mass - volume food converter which reflected one cup of water being about 237 grams; - then went to the dough calculator to convert the recipe into weights:

Flour (100%):       250 g  |  8.82 oz | 0.55 lbs
Water (94.8%):    237 g  |  8.36 oz | 0.52 lbs
IDY (1.2%):              3 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
Salt (2.8%):             7 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.46 tsp | 0.49 tbsp
Total (198.8%):      497 g | 17.53 oz | 1.1 lbs | TF = N/A

Peter and I discussed 2 items that were unclear in the recipe, that is the type of yeast and water temperature.  I used IDY and room temperature water.  The recipe was extremely easy to execute and the dough came together in my mixer after about 6 minutes ( the recipe indicated 10 or more minutes).  It yields a dough that is more like a thick batter.  I poured it into an oiled plastic bowl and it tripled in size in about the specified 2 hours.  I then dumped it onto a well floured cutting board, emphasis on well floured.  After the dough rises it is very bubbly, almost jello-like and extremely sticky.  Impossible to do anything with unless there is a lot of flour involved.  I did an initial shaping on the cutting board then slid it onto my SuperPeel for final shaping.  It shapes very easily but is also quite delicate.

I usually rub a thin layer of EVOO on top of the dough for some flavor and to prevent sauce penetration.  However, this dough will not tolerate such a massage so I sprayed on a light coating of Pam.  Then it was topped with sauce, Grande part skim mozz, and some sauteed mushrooms & onions.  Into my Wesco 560 oven at about 650 degrees on a stone.  Prior to this one, all of my pizzas are well cooked after about 5 to 6 minutes.  However, probably because of the high hydration, this one took about 8 or 9 minutes.

I must admit, the crust is everything the author claimed it to be - crisp exterior, light bubbly interior, with just the right amount of chewiness and texture.   Really good.  Iím actually shocked over how good this crust is after only a 2 hour proof!

Now the down side - the dough is very hard to work with because of the hydration.  Not hard to work with as far as shaping, thatís very easy.  I can see people having a big problem transferring it from the cutting board to the peel and peel to oven.  But with the SuperPeel it was not much of an issue for me.  Absent the SuperPeel, I guess youíd have to do the parchment or a screen.  The other issue, also related to the hydration, is all the bench flour required to interact with this dough.  With all my other doughs, around 64% hydration, I use very little bench flour and the bottom of the pizza is clean.  This ciabatta pizza yields a bottom crust with a nearly complete layer of flour.  Not something I like or am accustomed to.  But the taste and texture of this crust easily outweighs the flour issue.   Attached photos include the shaped skin, dressed skin, slice profile, bottom, and a partially devoured remnant. 
« Last Edit: May 15, 2009, 04:28:47 PM by BurntEdges »


Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2009, 09:14:08 AM »
Photos continued

Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2009, 09:16:37 AM »
Made it again, just to make sure it wasn't beginner's luck.  Great the second time too, this one with meatball. Oh, both pies were about 14" in diameter.

Offline jeff v

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1480
  • Location: Orland Park, IL
  • I'm Valentino not Varasano :)
    • Pizzeria Valentino
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2009, 11:05:26 AM »
BurntEdges,

That pizza looks great-I am going to make this one next week.

What kind of flour did you use?

Thanks,

jeff
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2009, 01:00:29 PM »
I used King Arthur Bread Flour.

Mortons Kosher salt.

Sorry I left that out.  I thought I covered everything, but ya' know how that goes.  Thanks.

Offline Schmid65

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 17
  • Slowly Learning :)
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2009, 03:02:03 PM »
Wow, that looks alot like what my pizzas are currently looking like as far as crust texture goes :)

Offline JConk007

  • Vendor
  • *
  • Posts: 3721
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Lovin my Oven!
    • Flirting with Fire
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2009, 09:47:26 PM »
Loooks Awsome :o
I am also planning to try this one for sure I just bought a book for  $.06 "Focaccia" Simple breads from the Italian Oven by Carol Field. But that will  now have to wait for the Ciabatta. I dont think so but Do these 2 types share any similarities?
Please post your results Jeff
Thanks

JOhn
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 09:49:55 PM by JConk007 »
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com

Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2009, 10:41:10 AM »
Loooks Awsome :o
I am also planning to try this one for sure I just bought a book for  $.06 "Focaccia" Simple breads from the Italian Oven by Carol Field. But that will  now have to wait for the Ciabatta. I dont think so but Do these 2 types share any similarities?
Please post your results Jeff
Thanks

JOhn
John,

Thanks for the kind words.  I'm not familiar with the book you referenced, so I don't know how the 2 recipes compare.  However, I routinely make a focaccia with another pizza dough and it comes out quite nice.  I stretch the skin into an oblong shape and dress it with a light coating of EVOO, minced garlic, herbs, and pepper.  I haven't tried it with the rustic ciabatta dough but that's a great idea!

Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2009, 05:11:45 AM »
Made my focaccia with this dough last night and it was fantastic!

Offline JConk007

  • Vendor
  • *
  • Posts: 3721
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Lovin my Oven!
    • Flirting with Fire
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2009, 10:57:38 AM »
LOVE It !!
J
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com


Offline Jose L. Piedra

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 364
  • Location: Montreal, QC
  • Ebeddu e cavuru, e beddu davveru!
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2009, 11:32:01 AM »
Could this recipe be adapted to the use of oil in the dough, or is the hydration just too high for that ?
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22430
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2009, 11:52:24 AM »
Could this recipe be adapted to the use of oil in the dough, or is the hydration just too high for that ?

JLP,

Based on my experience with the Jeffrey Steingarten dough formulation that I discussed at Replies 3 and 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8384.msg73720.html#msg73720, I don't see why you can't use oil in a high-hydration dough formulation. For the Steingarten dough formulation, I estimated almost 10% oil. If my experience with the Steingarten dough was typical, you may find that the pizza can bake for some time before you start to have problems with overbaking of the bottom crust. The top bake is likely to be more of a problem, especially with the cheese overcooking. I would think that the Rustic Ciabatta dough is likely to bake up similarly to the Steingarten dough, especially if you use a lot of oil.

Peter

Offline lil-dice

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2009, 03:06:17 PM »
Hey, I'm the "author" of the recipe you're referring to. Glad people are using it, I've used oil in it before, didn't really do anything for me.

Offline BurntEdges

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 93
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2009, 12:20:11 PM »
Thanks for chiming in Lil. 

This dough always performs well for me.  I was looking to adjust this recipe for a 2 day cold rise in the fridge, followed by a 1 or 2 hour counter warm up before baking.  Have you tried anything like that with this dough?  How would you suggest I adjust the recipe for a cold rise?  I'm sure we're looking at a decrease in the yeast, but any adjustment to the hydration?  Thanks.

Offline mnjesse

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 85
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2011, 02:23:46 PM »
I have been making this dough a lot lately. My first few attempts didn't turn out like I had hoped, but I think I have it figured out finally. First, make sure to oil the parchment paper. Second, dump the dough directly onto the oiled parchment paper and lightly flour the top of the dough. This allow one to handle the dough without sticking, but also eliminating the taste of raw flour which I hate. I have made a variety of things out of this dough including large loaves of ciabatta, ciabatta rolls for sandwiches, baguettes and pizza. It is great for all of these applications. For pizza, it has a great open crumb with a nice leathery outside. The ciabatta rolls and baguettes make excellent toasted sandwiches in the oven. The large loaves of ciabatta is my go to bread for when I make a pot of soup.

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2011, 06:01:11 PM »
I work the dough exactly the same way, directly on oiled parchment paper. The whole transfering thing makes no sense to me. I also agree with everyone, it's a wondeful recipe. I would make it more often but parchment paper is like hen's teeth where I live.
Don

I have been making this dough a lot lately. My first few attempts didn't turn out like I had hoped, but I think I have it figured out finally. First, make sure to oil the parchment paper. Second, dump the dough directly onto the oiled parchment paper and lightly flour the top of the dough. This allow one to handle the dough without sticking, but also eliminating the taste of raw flour which I hate. I have made a variety of things out of this dough including large loaves of ciabatta, ciabatta rolls for sandwiches, baguettes and pizza. It is great for all of these applications. For pizza, it has a great open crumb with a nice leathery outside. The ciabatta rolls and baguettes make excellent toasted sandwiches in the oven. The large loaves of ciabatta is my go to bread for when I make a pot of soup.

Offline Hobbs

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 63
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2013, 12:36:12 PM »
Sorry, know this is an old thread....

Has anybody tried this recipe? How much bench flour was used? Because I tried it the first time and this dough was a nightmare to work with unless there was a TON of bench flour... and the amount of bench flour used to manage the skin onto the peel has to knock down the hydration level significantly...

Why not just use 80-85% hydration from the get go? Or am I missing something?


Online tinroofrusted

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1299
  • Location: OC, CA
  • Experimenting....
Re: Rustic Ciabatta Pizza
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2013, 01:19:12 PM »
Yes, I've tried it a few times. It's true, the dough is really difficult to work with. So the answer is, don't work with it.  Just get your hands wet, grab the dough out of the bowl, stretch it quickly, toss it on the baking pan, dress it very lightly, and into the oven.  The reason for the very high hydration is that it gives the pizza a most delicious crumb. It's just a different taste than what you would get with a 80% hydration dough.  Give it a try and let us know how it goes.  And remember, wet hands when you grab the dough! 


 

pizzapan