Author Topic: Traditional, American Style, Thin Crust Pizza  (Read 5364 times)

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Offline Steve

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Traditional, American Style, Thin Crust Pizza
« on: October 01, 2003, 12:50:05 PM »
Recipe Name: Traditional, American Style, Thin Crust Pizza
By: Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Ingredients:
Flour (a strong bread type flour with 12 to 13% protein) 100.00%
Salt:1.75%
Sugar:(optional) 2.00%  
Compressed Yeast: 1.50%
Olive Oil/Vegetable Oil: 3.00%
Water (70 to 75F) 55 to 58.00%  
 

How to Prepare:
 
Standard Dough Making Procedure:Put water into the mixing bowl, add the salt and sugar, then add the flour and the yeast. Mix at low speed for about 2 minutes, then mix at medium speed until all of the flour has been picked up into the dough. Now add the oil and mix in for 2 minutes at low speed, then mix the dough at medium speed until it develops a smooth, satiny appearance (generally about 8 to 10 minutes using a planetary mixer). The dough temperature should be between 80 and 85F. Immediately divide the dough into desired weight pieces and round into balls. Wipe the dough balls with salad oil, and place into plastic dough boxes. Make sure that the dough balls are spaced about 2 inches apart. Cross stack the uncovered dough boxes in the cooler for 2 hours as this will allow the dough balls to cool down thoroughly, and uniformly. The dough boxes can then be nested, with the top box being covered. This will prevent excessive drying of the dough balls.The dough balls will be ready to use after about 12 hours of refrigeration. They can be used after up to 72 hours of refrigeration with good results. To use the dough balls, remove a quantity from the cooler and allow them to warm at room temperature for approximately 2-3 hours. The dough can then be shaped into skins, or shaped into pans for proofing. Unused dough can remain at room temperature (covered to prevent drying) for up to 6 hours after removal from the cooler.Note: If using ACTIVE DRY YEAST (ADY) only half the amo0unt as compressed yeast. Then suspend the ADY in a small quantity of warm water (105 110F) and allow it to stand for 10 to 15 minutes. Add this to the water in the mixing bowl, but do not add the salt and sugar to the water, instead, add the salt and sugar to the flour, then begin mixing as directed.If using INSTANT DRY YEAST (IDY) us only 1/3 the amount as compressed yeast. Add the IDY to the flour along with the salt and sugar, and begin mixing as directed.  

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Offline Randy

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Re:Traditional, American Style, Thin Crust Pizza
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2003, 01:00:39 PM »
My recipe is very close to his with the exception of the yeast.  I use SAF hybrid yeast requiring it to be mixed with the flour.
I have recently started measuring the temp of the finished product but have not been able to achieve 80F+ in a cool kitchen even using 130F water.
Randy

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
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Re:Traditional, American Style, Thin Crust Pizza
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2003, 01:19:32 PM »
Here's the recipe scaled for home use.

Using a standard 25 pound sack of flour, the recipe becomes:

25 pounds flour
7 ounces salt
8 ounces sugar
6 ounces compressed yeast
12 ounces olive/vegetable oil
13.75 - 14.50 pounds water

Divide by 25 to end up with 1 pound of flour:

1 pound flour (3 1/2 cups sifted)
0.28 ounces salt (1 1/2 teaspoon)
0.32 ounces sugar (2 1/4 teaspoons)
0.24 ounces yeast (1 3/4 teaspoon)
0.48 ounces olive/veg. oil (1 tablespoon)
8.80 - 9.28 ounces water (1 cup)
« Last Edit: October 01, 2003, 01:20:19 PM by Steve »
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