Author Topic: Pete's DiFara's Pizza  (Read 9380 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #25 on: February 14, 2005, 10:29:36 PM »
Friz,

Thanks for posting the recipe. You indicated in a prior post that you thought that the pizzas could be "so much better". Is there anything particular that you had in mind that might improve on what you did?

Peter


Offline friz78

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #26 on: February 15, 2005, 10:01:28 AM »
Pete,
In terms of any changes/adjustments I would make to the recipe, here are a few thoughts:

1.)  I would definitely take more time and care in spreading the dough and make sure it did not exceed 15 inches in diameter.  The combination of the flours, it seems to me, makes the stretching of this dough particularly important and challenging.

2.)  It would be interesting to see what the effect of increasing the amount of yeast would do to this dough, say from 3/4 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon.  I have a sense that this adjustment might produce a bit more of an "airy" dough, thereby making it a bit more like a Neapolitan crust instead of a NY style.  Of course, that's just an educated guess on my part.

3.)  Lastly, it would be interesting to increase the knead time to 15 minutes instead of 10.  I think this might enhance the chew and slightly reduce the extensibility of the dough.

Make no mistake, these are just minor adjustments and none of them is imperative in my mind.  In the spirit of experimentation though, it would be interesting to see if any of the above recommendations positively or negatively affect the finished product.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #27 on: February 15, 2005, 11:03:05 AM »
Friz,

It occurred to me that if you want to go beyond 15 inches to 16 inches, you could adjust your formulation to produce a slightly larger dough ball weight. Using your present formulation, I calculated that the dough ball you made was around 15.75 oz. (it may have varied a bit depending on any slight changes you may have made during formation.) That calculation includes the weights of the ADY, salt, sugar and olive oil (which, cumulatively, are minor--less than a half ounce--in comparison with the weights of the flours and water).  Based on the 15.75 oz. figure and assuming a 15-inch dough round, I calculated the thickness factor (TF) for your crust to be 0.089, which is considered "thin". If you decide you want to go to 16 inches and maintain the same crust thickness, then the dough ball weight would be 3.14 x 8 x 8 x 0.089 = 17.9 oz. To calculate the weights of the individual ingredients for that size, you would have to settle on all the baker's percents. You might decide, for example, to change the ratios of flours, change the hydration percent, increase the amount of yeast, etc.  It becomes fairly straightforward to calculate the quantities once you have decided on what formulation you want to use.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 14, 2006, 07:28:15 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2005, 11:19:54 AM »
I would be interested in more feedback on how the Di Fara pie(s) tasted. I have experiemented with combining KASL with Caputo 00 flour and the results were not good taste wise. Comments from my family were centered around the pies tasting "funny." I noted a certain non-pleasing flavor bordering on anchovy saltiness as well.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2005, 07:08:03 PM by pftaylor »
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Offline friz78

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #29 on: February 15, 2005, 03:56:36 PM »
Peter,
You are right - the finished dough ball weighed 15.8 ounces after mixing.
Pft,
As far as how it tasted, I was somewhat surprised at the flavor that it possessed - much  better than I expected.  The 2nd pizza dough was more flavorful and I think this had to do with the addition of the sugar and the olive oil.  I know it goes against conventional wisdom to use extra virgin olive oil in a dough recipe, but I thought I'd give it a shot to encourage browning.  It seemed to accomplish that goal quite well and, at the same time, provide a little additional flavor as well.  I did notice a bit of a "salty" taste in pizza #1, although not extremely so.  Again, perhaps the small amount of sugar in pizza #2 offset the "salty" taste from pizza #1.  One concern I had with the sugar addition was that the dough would taste sweet and I don't particularly care for sweet tasting doughs. Fortunately, there was no "sugary" taste to the dough whatsoever.  I would say that the sugar was totally undetectable in the flavor of the dough even though it may have offset the "salty" taste that comes with combining flours.
Friz

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #30 on: February 15, 2005, 04:18:04 PM »
Friz,
So I'm not the only one, eh? I wonder what causes the salty taste? I can't stand it. Thanks for the tip on using sugar as a way to defeat the salty flavor. I have intentionally stayed away from using sugar so I think you have "cracked the case" for me on using 00 flour.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete's DiFara's Pizza
« Reply #31 on: February 15, 2005, 05:44:25 PM »
Friz,

The reason you couldn't detect the sugar is because there was so little of it used. At 1/2 t., or about 0.07 oz., that comes to about 0.45% in baker's percentage terms. To be detectable in the finished crust, the usual threshold is around 4-5% (according to tests performed by Tom Lehmann). I am particularly sensitive to sugar in everything, so I suspect my threshold is quite a bit below 4-5%. At those levels, you would be talking about 2 T. 

Peter