Author Topic: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven  (Read 14264 times)

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Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #20 on: April 06, 2006, 07:17:15 PM »
Danes Dad:

It's a MOS2E  220V Model.  2850 watts.  Both decks measure 17 X 17 1/2.  Oh yeah... A real pizza oven.
The make-up board is a wood fiber laminate.  It's 18 X 18.  The markings are just tracings of various stones I've used.
I'm not sure where it came from.  My wife bought it after watching me lug around a big NSF plastic cutting board.   This is WAY better.

Hope this helps.


Offline John39840

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2006, 05:29:14 AM »
Danes Dad:

It's a MOS2E  220V Model.  2850 watts.  Both decks measure 17 X 17 1/2.  Oh yeah... A real pizza oven.
The make-up board is a wood fiber laminate.  It's 18 X 18.  The markings are just tracings of various stones I've used.
I'm not sure where it came from.  My wife bought it after watching me lug around a big NSF plastic cutting board.   This is WAY better.

Hope this helps.


I own the identical Biaggia model MESOPI-1898 1450W electric countertop oven as you. The oven has elements on the very top and bottom, and is able to fit a thirteen inch pizza.

The biggest downfall is not having an adjustable temperature control. Interestingly, the element on the top actually gets much hotter, or more red, than the bottom. Although, I've never had the chance to officially test the temperature with my infrared thermometer. Either my unit is defective, or it purposely uses some sort of resistor.

At first, I was a little disappointed with the Biaggia's performance vs. a typical oven. The dough tended to rise a good deal more, and become too bread-like. There also wasn't the same amount of crispness. But then, I modified the oven to include clay tiles covering a half inch over the bottom element, and tiles lining the aluminum ceiling. I even began the practice of warming up the electric oven, allowing the tiles a greater chance to retain/release heat.

Suddenly, the results of the Biaggia are within ten percent of my typical oven performance. Not bad for something purchased for $5 on clearance from Kohl's, with $2 worth of tiles from Home Depot. :) Although, your Bakers Pride looks like a really nice investment. ;)
« Last Edit: September 29, 2006, 05:37:19 AM by John39840 »

Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2006, 02:26:43 PM »
Yeah John....  For 7 bucks, you're doin' all right, kid.  Keep experimenting.  Nothing but great people in this forum who really want you to excel.
As far as the Bakers Pride, it's goin' bye-bye.  Sitting outside off my deck is a 2500 pound, wood only behemoth.  Looks like I'm starting over, as well.
Good luck!

Offline ehanner

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2008, 12:46:43 AM »
I have been following along and am new to this forum. I'm an avid artisan bread baker and occasional pizza guy. I have been using 2 peels like those above for a while. The metal is easiest for removing the pizza or bread after it's done but the wood is the only way to go for loading the oven. However, I had a great idea that I could glue a layer of wood veneer on the top surface of the aluminum peel and have the best of both tools. The wood veneer would take a thin coating of flour and it's not so thick that it would soak any amount of moisture out of the dough and create a sticky surface. I have the veneer so I think I'll give it a try. Has anyone ever heard of such a thing?

For what it's worth I generally use a sheet of parchment paper to lay the stretched dough on and cook on a stone. No sticking issues ever!

Eric

Offline pcampbell

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #24 on: April 09, 2008, 06:20:13 PM »
How is it to deal with the small distance of 3" between the decks?  On the Baker's pride model...

One thing I noticed, with the newer DP-2BL model, it is brick lined, and has separate controls for each element.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2008, 06:24:30 PM by pcampbell »
Patrick

Offline pwaldman

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #25 on: April 18, 2008, 12:07:20 AM »
I was looking at the DP-2BL model because of the extra height clearance but I believe the separate controls are for each chamber and not the elements within the chambers.  Would've been nice though!

Pete

Offline pcampbell

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #26 on: April 18, 2008, 12:21:18 PM »
Based on the specs, separate thermostats for each chamber are standard.  Top/bottom element heat controls are optional.  I was surprised they would offer an option but I couldn't figure that this means anything else than what it sounds like!

http://www.bakerspride.com/specs/DP-2.pdf

There's 4 knobs on each rack there, one timer, one thermostat(?) and 2 for each element(?)  Too bad the picture isn't very good.
Patrick

Offline pwaldman

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #27 on: April 18, 2008, 12:45:29 PM »
Didn't notice that!  I've got to see if I can find one of these and actually touch, feel, salivate, ........!!

Offline briterian

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #28 on: April 21, 2008, 03:59:11 PM »
I have a bakers pride M02t - got it on ebay for about $200.00....Loving it.... I have a fibrament stone I use for extra crisp.

Offline SteveInOakland

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Re: The Stoned Countertop Pizza Oven
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2009, 09:34:36 PM »
I just bought a slightly used Garland-CPO-12H and had a few questions.  This is very similar to your baker's pride shown above and has two decks for cooking (one temp control).  First, and guidance on temp, style and results that yield good quality results?  I have some pretty good pizza knowledge, but want to understand how others have gotten these desktops to perform.

For example:  Direct dough with lower protein Italian flour, temps and results?
                   Biga-style aged dough (mother slow rise etc.) higher protein (American flour), temp and results recommended?
                   Best NY style results.

Also, I am wondering if I overpaid, as the guy raised the price $80 on me claiming another offer after I called.  Any thought on what is a good price?  I saw one listed as new for $1519.  Also, while a pretty small interior, any experiences trying to "brick-line" after the fact if not BL to start?  This one is pretty well insulated, and lower deck has upper to radiate, but wondered if these decks work like brick or if adding a thin stone or other stuff inside improves performance.


 

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