Author Topic: Sourdough Starter (50% hydration) request  (Read 3050 times)

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Offline pizza eater

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Sourdough Starter (50% hydration) request
« on: June 13, 2009, 01:12:22 AM »
Could you guys tell me how to make Sourdough Starter (50% hydration)? I am new to the dough-making world.
Thanks.


Offline Matthew

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Re: Sourdough Starter (50% hydration) request
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2009, 06:14:41 AM »
Could you guys tell me how to make Sourdough Starter (50% hydration)? I am new to the dough-making world.
Thanks.

You're much better off purchasing one.  Most of us; like myself who use sour dough starters have purchased them from sourdo.com.

Matthew

Offline kross

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Re: Sourdough Starter (50% hydration) request
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2009, 03:52:58 PM »
While you're there, buy his book too!

Offline patnx2

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Re: Sourdough Starter (50% hydration) request
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2011, 01:04:54 AM »
hydration is always % of water to flour.with flour always being 100%. So 50% hydration is one half of flour.  so 100g flour 50g water is 50%hydration. And as for starting your own sd starter to for it is fun and once you learn you can make it out of flour, fruit  or    Luck Patrick
Patrick

Offline yumarama

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Re: Sourdough Starter (50% hydration) request
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2011, 10:03:59 AM »
50% hydration starter is pretty darn stiff stuff. Is there a specific reason you need to have such a beast?

Making starter isn't that difficult although it does take a bit of time. See instructions here: http://bit.ly/StarterFromScratch for the illustrated steps. If this seems complex, purchasing one works too, as noted above.

This will set you up with 100% hydration starter: equal weights of flour and water, not volumes. Once you have that going and getting good, consistent results (say a month so your baby starter has built up some strength and character) then feel free to reduce the water quantity on your feed to half the weight of what you first used (now 50% water to 100% flour). Instead of a small jar of batter-like starter, you will then have a ball of sourdough you can pinch a little off of and work into your dough, until you are left with just a small bit of 'mother starter', then feed that back up to a full sized ball. Repeat infinitum as needed.

What you'll give up by going to 50% hydration: most visible signs that the starter is active. At that low a hydration, there's no obvious bubbling and not a lot of expanding. You'll need to just "know" when your freshly refreshed starter is ready. With a 100% hydration starter, you see the bubbles in the starter jar, you can see it double in size (or better) in a couple of hours and see when it is peaking and about to collapse, having consumed all it's food. 100% hydration also makes for easier calculations when adding to a recipe that calls for commercial yeast: you know that if you add 186 g starter to a recipe, it's adding 93 g each flour and water, etc.. Simple maths.

What you'll gain: Your starter will be slower in consuming it's food so less feeds needed, somewhat simpler to handle and keep, longer period needed between feeds, and (I'm told) a slightly different flavour profile. As I don't keep a stiff starter, I can't really talk to that in detail. I would add that many people keep their stiff starter at 66% hydration - 3 parts flour to 2 parts water by weight - which is closer to most bread ratios.

What you might want to do: Get a 100% starter going and use that for a while, then take some of your excess and turn that into a stiff starter. Work with BOTH for a while and see if you find either a marked improvement over the other then go with the one you like better.

Then come back here and let us know your results, what you liked and disliked about each and how they affected your dough.