Author Topic: high hydration, salt levels and dop tomatoes  (Read 3938 times)

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Offline artigiano

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  • Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Re: high hydration, salt levels and dop tomatoes
« Reply #20 on: August 31, 2009, 09:30:54 PM »
thanks SAAD,

I have been busy lately but I will try your advice this weekend.  I have been quite busy lately so haven't had a chance lately.  I think I should use the dough sooner, as i think it may be over fermenting a touch and that could be partly responsible for a chewier dough.  I always mix by hand.. I would love to buy the santos.. but man is it expensive but i am sure worth the price.

Al


Offline s00da

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Re: high hydration, salt levels and dop tomatoes
« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2009, 05:44:54 AM »
Welcome back Al, actually I haven't been doing much of baking either as my flour supplier is still waiting for more stock. I'm just stuck with local AP flour that I think is made from soft wheats which is actually nice for Neapolitan but I've been into NY style for the past months  ;D

About mixing, I'm in the process of evaluating my options among the three mixers: Santos, DLX and Bosch.

Saad

Offline artigiano

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  • Age: 33
  • Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Re: high hydration, salt levels and dop tomatoes
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2009, 08:15:52 PM »
Hey Saad and others,

If i am using ap flour i even mix it with pastry flour to get it even softer which is closer to the italian flours.  I also like to mix white bread flour with pastry flour at around 60/40 mix.  I know I started this thread questioning high levels of hydration leading to a heavier dough that may be too chewy but after some experimenting I now believe differently.  People told me that it is hard to over knead by hand, howevor, I believe my pizzas turn out far lighter and softer with minimal kneading and around a 62 percent hydration.  I believe spending too much time kneading the dough will make it too tough.  For a while I complicated my pizza making style a lot with the room temp neapolitan style rise and camoldoli starter, but I have for the time being switched to cold fermentation.  I often find that the dough tastes more complex an interesting after the cold rise.  I still have Caputo in the house but i am enjoying my bread and pastry flour mix and i get a nice thin airey crust which I really enjoy.

Alessandro