Author Topic: New York Times Article: Di Fara's  (Read 5250 times)

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Offline scott123

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2010, 07:53:56 AM »
Joe's Pizza? Really? I wonder where that is  ;D

There's not a million Joe's Pizza's in the area.  If you google 'Joe's Pizza Brooklyn' you get three places, 2 of which are part of the chain that began at Carmine & Bleecker. I haven't been in quite some time, but Joe's is pizza Mecca for me.  They tend to go a little light on the cheese, but the crust is magnificent.  Joes is most likely in the $2.50/slice realm these days and I can promise you that the crust blows DiFara's out of the water.

Oh, and regardless of the hordes of people in and out of Joe's, you'll never have to wait more than a few minutes for a slice.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2010, 08:07:00 AM by scott123 »


Offline PizzaVera

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2010, 08:32:03 AM »
You can get great 'old skool' pizza from a lot of other places in the NY metro area at a fraction of the price- pizza that may not be made with a dough that's been fermented a couple of days, but a same day or an overnight dough with a boatload more character than DiFara's.

DiFara's pizza only 'works' for people that don't appreciate properly fermented dough- ie, tourists. Most native NYers may not know the first thing about fermentation, but they know a good crust when they taste it. Most of us were weaned on pizza. It's in our blood.

Difarra has been in NEW YORK for 50 years.. NEW YORK!! the people have spoken! he is still there.. long before he was a tourist clown to entartain the tourists, through the 60's 70's 80's and 90's!  you saying all those people in brooklyn in the 60's to the 80's didnt know the first thing about pizza?
he would have closed down back in the 70's if that was the case..
then again, half America have no idea what a real pizza is, when places like Dominos, papa johns, little ceasers and pizza hutt can stay in business..

unfortunately we meet Difarra now when he is in his 70's.. he probably can't be bothered.. but im sure back in the days the 60's or 70's for him he was a GUN on the oven!

yes pizza has changed a lot in the past 20 years, we see more higher grade ovens! more variety of cheeses, tomato sauce etc..  more skilled pizziolos coming over from napals working wood fired ovens, different toppings, different people...

sure maybe Difarra never made an Amazing pizza..and he just coasted through with customers.. but now he is being labeled a legend for his longevity .
sure there are people making better pies than him.. I am one of them  8) :-D 

it's a landmark.. what do you do...


« Last Edit: June 30, 2010, 08:39:22 AM by PizzaVera »

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2010, 09:23:38 AM »
Joe's Pizza? Really? I wonder where that is  ;D

I haven't been in quite some time, but Joe's is pizza Mecca for me.

 :-D I just noticed your avatar. :-D

I've never been there so I can't comment on his pies. But the fact that people in and around his own area don't eat there and say that it is a tourist attraction says something. The reason he has lines out his door is because he moves at an increadibly slow pace. The line of tourists outside don't care because they have heard his pies are awesome so they are willing to wait the time it takes to get a slice or a pie. Maybe when he moves on and gives the business to the kids it will change for the better.

Online norma427

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2010, 11:20:29 AM »
I have never tried DiFariaís pizza, but the just this January, my oldest daughter was in New York to visit friends. I had asked her if she would bring me home a  DiFara's pizza to try.  They went in the evening to purchase me a pie to then try at home.  After they went in, my daughter told me the place was so dirty and smoky, she wouldnít even think about buying me a pie.  She watched Dom taking the one pizza out of the oven and she said it was so burnt, she would never even try a slice.  Of course, I didnít end up with any pizza to try.  I donít know if Dom was having a bad day or what happened.  All I ended up with was a picture outside of DiFaraís.  My daughters friends have lived in Queens and Brooklyn NY all their lives and tried many pizzas from all over NY.  They also wouldn't purchase any pies from DiFara's on that day.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 30, 2010, 11:22:04 AM by norma427 »
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Offline hotsawce

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2010, 11:21:11 AM »
You're talking out of your behind. It's evident to me you've never even had any of the places you're speaking of.


yes, you are right ... maybe he didnt learn more , but he found something which worked and he stuck with it.. why change a recipe which works..
if you want pazzaz go to MOTORINO or KESTE  they are making  trendy pizza.. you want old skool go to DIFARRA! he is one of a kind!

you want some garbage call dominos or pizza hutt..

Offline hotsawce

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2010, 11:26:04 AM »
"Difarra" isn't how it's spelled and Di Fara isn't his name.

Pizza Hut is still here. So is Dominos. Does that make them good? And no one has seen your pizzas yet, but the way you speak I'm not looking forward to much.....

Your posts have been rude and nearly spamworthy.

Difarra has been in NEW YORK for 50 years.. NEW YORK!! the people have spoken! he is still there.. long before he was a tourist clown to entartain the tourists, through the 60's 70's 80's and 90's!  you saying all those people in brooklyn in the 60's to the 80's didnt know the first thing about pizza?
he would have closed down back in the 70's if that was the case..
then again, half America have no idea what a real pizza is, when places like Dominos, papa johns, little ceasers and pizza hutt can stay in business..

unfortunately we meet Difarra now when he is in his 70's.. he probably can't be bothered.. but im sure back in the days the 60's or 70's for him he was a GUN on the oven!

yes pizza has changed a lot in the past 20 years, we see more higher grade ovens! more variety of cheeses, tomato sauce etc..  more skilled pizziolos coming over from napals working wood fired ovens, different toppings, different people...

sure maybe Difarra never made an Amazing pizza..and he just coasted through with customers.. but now he is being labeled a legend for his longevity .
sure there are people making better pies than him.. I am one of them  8) :-D 

it's a landmark.. what do you do...




Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #26 on: June 30, 2010, 11:47:55 AM »
After they went in, my daughter told me the place was so dirty and smoky, she wouldn’t even think about buying me a pie.  She watched Dom taking the one pizza out of the oven and she said it was so burnt, she would never even try a slice.

That is another thing that was repeated over and over again, that the place is really dirty. I read that they have been shut down a bunch of times because of DOH violations.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #27 on: June 30, 2010, 11:51:29 AM »
I hope this doesn't turn into a food fight between members.

For those who are interested in how the name "Di Fara" came into being, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Di_Fara_Pizza.

Peter

Offline hotsawce

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #28 on: June 30, 2010, 11:56:10 AM »
To me, it just looks like they don't care about anything and want to rake in as much money as they can, which is evident by the introduction of T-Shirts now.

It's literally disgusting. I would never make my customers deal with that.

That is another thing that was repeated over and over again, that the place is really dirty. I read that they have been shut down a bunch of times because of DOH violations.

Offline gabaghool

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2013, 05:14:00 PM »
well they should charge a premium for the pizza. I mean the man is a legend in NYC why should he be charging the same price as everyone else.. do you think AL PACINO charges the same price for his services as a no name actor? of course not..

DI FARA and the family know that the place will die with the old man! so its best to get as much money as they can now before the old man passes away.. because once he is gone the shop will be closed...
5 dollars is not that expensive anyway.. jeezzz I mean a bigmac or a latte grande costs almost that...
the 5 bucks you pay at DI FARA'S ,  you get to see the old man make the pizza for you.. you can talk to you him if you want..
and see the legendary place.. beats ordering a drink in the meat packer district for 10 bucks!
VIVA DI FARA~!!!

Well, he certainly hasn't planned ahead for anyone to take over as "pizzamaker"....it is VERY, VERY PUZZLING.


Offline BenLee

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2013, 10:59:06 AM »
It's pretty clear that DiFara is a prime example of how one voice "Ed Levine" can literally create the market for such a product.  If Ed labels you in a book as the best pizzeria, everyone follows suit and it literally becomes a self fulfilling prophecy. 

All things being equal, the amount of violations and shut downs that this place has had from the health department leads me to believe that Demarco doesn't care as much as people think he does.  I'm sure the kitchen is nothing short of 60 years worth of grime and neglect.

I guess it's debatable. The Grande "Fresh mozz," which really isn't all that fresh, doesn't really qualify in my opinion. He uses the standard Berio olive oil....and even his hard cheeses range in consistency and appearance. Sometimes grana, sometimes parm, and on top of it you never know if you're going to get a properly cooked pie.

The best ingredients, for me, would be a very fresh house made mozz, a higher quality evoo, consistency in the hard cheeses, etc.

It's just all over the place for me.

 Anyway, Scott, I agree with you. I find Di Fara to be the prime example of lipstick on a pig, and I never understood why they were trumpeted as amazing, and often perfect pizza. The only thing I can say I liked was the squares, and I think that could be done better easily (my next project ;D )
« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 11:00:59 AM by BenLee »

Offline BenLee

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #31 on: November 07, 2013, 11:02:53 AM »
:-D I just noticed your avatar. :-D

I've never been there so I can't comment on his pies. But the fact that people in and around his own area don't eat there and say that it is a tourist attraction says something. The reason he has lines out his door is because he moves at an increadibly slow pace. The line of tourists outside don't care because they have heard his pies are awesome so they are willing to wait the time it takes to get a slice or a pie. Maybe when he moves on and gives the business to the kids it will change for the better.

If the locals say it, you know its a tourist attraction.  Brooklyn has become infested with hipsters that are not native to the area. 

Offline karschsp

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #32 on: December 15, 2013, 08:44:05 AM »
I've never been there nor tried the pizza, but this video about DiFara's inspires me to make the best pizza that I possibly can!

The Best Thing I Ever Done on Vimeo

Offline francofromny

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2013, 11:32:30 PM »
the pizza business is tough a lot of hours and dedication go into a place so he deserves all the credit, but damn i just wish i can find a spot to throw grana, san marzano, fior di latte (no he doesnt use bufala), and a caputo mix of flour into my 70% hydrated dough to make a pizza that i can sell for 5 bucks a slice or 30 a pie... ??? :-X

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2013, 08:40:49 AM »
the pizza business is tough a lot of hours and dedication go into a place so he deserves all the credit, but damn i just wish i can find a spot to throw grana, san marzano, fior di latte (no he doesnt use bufala), and a caputo mix of flour into my 70% hydrated dough to make a pizza that i can sell for 5 bucks a slice or 30 a pie... ??? :-X

francofromny,

It's been several years since I last closely followed DiFara's and Dom DeMarco but in 2005 I discussed the cheeses that Dom was using at the time, at Reply 122 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,504.msg11222/topicseen.html#msg11222. My recollection is that Dom used bufala back then. Did he discontinue that practice?

Peter

Offline akuban

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Re: New York Times Article: Di Fara's
« Reply #35 on: December 16, 2013, 09:47:03 AM »
@Pete-zza: He seems to change it up. Every time I've been there, it's ALWAYS been a blend of low-moisture ("regular") mozzarella, fresh mozzarella (either fior di latte or buffalo mozz), and grana padano. I'm not sure I've ever seen him mix fior di latte and bufala. It seems like he uses bufala when he has it and moves to fior di latte when he runs out. That is CONJECTURE, though. That is the way I've always reconciled it in my head as to why it's fdl sometimes and bufala others. Honestly, I think I may have seen him use bufala once. Mostly I just see the large tubs of Grande FDL.
°Hasta la pizza!


 

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