Author Topic: Baker's yeast quantity prediction model - please compare to your results  (Read 12744 times)

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Online TXCraig1

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You guys are too kind.
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Online quixoteQ

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All right, this post probably won't mean anything to anyone, since I used more IDY than any of the figures in this model, but I would really like to see more photos of people's dough and how they match up with the predictions.

From mix to bake, this batch sat for 75 hrs: bulk, 24 hrs, CF at 39-40F; balled, 47 hrs, CF at 39-40F; 4 hrs, room temp. at 70F.

KABF
Room temp. water 61%
IDY .2%
Total weight: 1543.16 grams
Ball: 385.79 g

Pics: fridge temp., two dough balls after 71 hrs CF, and 4 hrs later before opening.
Josh

Offline juniorballoon

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Your dough looks very similar to mine at each of those stages. Very little activity in the fridge. Nicely risen after 4 hours at room temp.

jb

Online quixoteQ

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Your dough looks very similar to mine at each of those stages. Very little activity in the fridge. Nicely risen after 4 hours at room temp.

jb

What's interesting to me is that when I used the final two dough balls today (five days), I took photos again: once when I took them out of the fridge, and again four hours later right before the bake.  There was certainly more activity in the dough, but much less than I expected given the two extra CF days.

The pies were great. The flavor was tasty but the texture was nearly perfect.  The bite had a great crisp to it but the crust itself was extremely light.  Opening the dough was a pleasure, too.

First pic is just after removing the dough from the fridge, the other four hours later after resting at room temperature.
Josh

Online TXCraig1

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What's interesting to me is that when I used the final two dough balls today (five days), I took photos again: once when I took them out of the fridge, and again four hours later right before the bake.  There was certainly more activity in the dough, but much less than I expected given the two extra CF days.

Experience is key to great pizza. There are probably many recipes that make OK pizza without much effort - but if you want great pizza, you will have to tweak and experiment. There are way too many important variables that differ meaningfully from personal situation to personal situation.

It's entirely possible that the table in this thread predicts too few fermentation hours at cold temps. The refrigerated fermentation data I had to work with is wildly inconsistent. I'll take a look at it again in the coming weeks.
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Online quixoteQ

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Experience is key to great pizza. There are probably many recipes that make OK pizza without much effort - but if you want great pizza, you will have to tweak and experiment. There are way too many important variables that differ meaningfully from personal situation to personal situation.

It's entirely possible that the table in this thread predicts too few fermentation hours at cold temps. The refrigerated fermentation data I had to work with is wildly inconsistent. I'll take a look at it again in the coming weeks.

No doubts about that . . . my experience level would be generously titled "rookie" and the few tweaks I have made to my recipes and work flow have very little in the way of variable control.  Heh.  Room temperature is a case example.  I just wanted to post what my dough looked like in the hope of encouraging others to do the same.  I was reading through a few of Jackie Tran's threads, and I saw some pics of what his dough looks like right before opening the balls.  Pretty beautiful.  In the particular thread, he was working with shorter ferment times, but it made me want to see how important those ferment times were.

Hopefully more people will post here.  Thanks again for all your work, Craig.
Josh

Offline ChristianVerschaeren

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Divella 100%
Water 63%
Salt 3%
Cake yeast 0,05% (That's what I went for anyway, might be a bit off)

24 h bulk
25 h balled


Offline Johnny the Gent

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Dough prepared at 4:00 pm with a RTB (ready to bake) time of 9:00 pm. A couple more hours to go.  I used just a smidgen more CY than suggested because what I have has been in the fridge for about a week, and I was afraid the yeasties may have lost some potency  ;D

Looks good so far. Thanks Craig for the awesome model!
« Last Edit: June 23, 2014, 06:19:42 PM by Johnny the Gent »
Il miglior fabbro

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Pies came out great! Photos look like they were snapped with a Coke bottle, not sure what's up with my cell phone these days  :-D
Il miglior fabbro

Online TXCraig1

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Beautiful - love the pepperoni and onion combo.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


Offline cupcake

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This thread is very informative. I just acquired a proper food scale and I now realize that I'm grossly over-fermenting my dough.

Attached is my ball after 46 hours in the fridge with around 1.2% IDY.

My only concern now is that in order to do my 2-pie doughs with the percentages on this table, I have to measure down to fractions of a gram. Which is tricky.

Online orangeman1

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I ended up getting a milligram scale and then converted as closely as possible to fractions of a teaspoon which is much easier to use than always weighing on such a sensitive scale.

Online TXCraig1

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Say you want 0.1g of yeast and you scale only measures to 1g resolution, dissolve 1g yeast in 99g water and use 10g of the mixture to get 0.1g ~+/- 0.04g

You can increase the accuracy to ~+/-0.004g by using a scale that measures to 0.1g resolution or by dissolving 10g yeast in 990g water and use 10g of the mixture.

Be sure to subtract water in the mixture from formula water.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline cupcake

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Sigh. So many years in university and I still couldn't figure that one out.

Thanks!

Online TXCraig1

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Sigh. So many years in university and I still couldn't figure that one out.

Thanks!

Iron sharpens iron.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.