Author Topic: NJ Boardwalk Pizza  (Read 179875 times)

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Offline Ev

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1060 on: June 08, 2012, 11:12:25 PM »
An interesting review to say the least, as were some of the comments. Makes me wanna drive down there and check it out! ;)


Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1061 on: June 08, 2012, 11:20:20 PM »
An interesting review to say the least, as were some of the comments. Makes me wanna drive down there and check it out! ;)

Steve,

Whenever you have time and if you really want to.   ;D  Remember we did talk about going to Phila.

Norma
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Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1062 on: June 09, 2012, 12:07:00 AM »
I have a feeling that more places use a mozz/cheddar then most of us are aware of.To be trueful, many/most mozzarellas today are rather bland and lacking on flavor, the cheddar adds a little extra punch to the flavor profile. I believe that the orangy oil that you see on many pizzas are a pretty reliable tell that some cheddar may have been used.

Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1063 on: June 09, 2012, 07:05:46 AM »
I have a feeling that more places use a mozz/cheddar then most of us are aware of.To be trueful, many/most mozzarellas today are rather bland and lacking on flavor, the cheddar adds a little extra punch to the flavor profile. I believe that the orangy oil that you see on many pizzas are a pretty reliable tell that some cheddar may have been used.

Dave,

You are probably correct that more pizza businesses might use a blend with some cheddar in the blend than we think.  There are so many kinds of blocks of mozzarella available to pizzerias that to me it is almost mind blowing.  Different ones available from distributors do have a good taste when tasted plain or baked on a pizza. 

I sure donít know, but the way Mackís pizza oils off there sure must be a lot of cheddar for their pies, if it isnít all cheddar.

My daughter picked me up 4 packs of the Great Lakes Cheddar last evening.  It might even be tried as a full cheddar pie in the next few weeks.

Norma 
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1064 on: June 09, 2012, 12:53:24 PM »
A  couple more articles about Joey Mackís Boardwalk Pizza and how it might related to Mackís pizza, Manco & Manco and Marucaís in Seaside Heights with the cheddar and how the owners of MackĎs, Manco & Manco, MarucaĎs, and Joey Mack are all related.  Joey Mack also managed Mackís North in the late 60ís, so he should know the dough formulation and the kind of cheese that is used on all the pies.  Joey Mack also pours his sauce like Marucaís does with something like a coffeepot.  It says in the second article Joey Mack revealed the ďdifferent cheeseĒ by pulling out a bag labeled ďshredded white cheddarĒ.

http://archives.citypaper.net/food/restaurants/id/2389/Joey+Mack's+Boardwalk+Pizza/

http://archives.citypaper.net/articles/2006/08/24/Off-The-Menu

http://beefandbuns.blogspot.com/2011/06/joey-macks-boardwalk-pizza.html

http://philadelphia.foobooz.com/2006/08/24/boardwalk-pizza-in-south-philly/

Differing opinions on Joey Mackís pizza on Yelp. http://www.yelp.com/biz/joey-macks-boardwalk-pizza-philadelphia

My daughter just purchased a new Nissan on Thursday so I think I will have to talk her into a road trip even if the neighborhood is bad.  :-D

I still am thinking that the cheese is all cheddar, but donít know.

Norma
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1065 on: June 09, 2012, 01:27:00 PM »
I sure donít know, but the way Mackís pizza oils off there sure must be a lot of cheddar for their pies, if it isnít all cheddar.


Norma,

I was reading some Yelp and other reviews of the Mack's pizzas this morning, and one of the biggest complaints was that the Mack's pizzas are too oily or greasy. Those of us who have worked with cheddar cheese know how much oil it releases during baking. Cheddar cheese has more fat, in terms of Total Fat and Sat Fat, than mozzarella does, and perhaps that is why it oils off more. For example, a typical mozzarella cheese, whether it is a low-moisture part-skim or whole-milk mozzarella, and whether used alone or in a blend (like the 50/50 East Coast blend from Grande), has 6 grams of Total Fat and 4 grams of Sat Fat per ounce. On occasion, you might find a brand with 5 grams of Total Fat and 3.4 grams of Sat Fat per ounce. By contrast, a mild cheddar cheese, white or colored, typically has 9 grams of Total Fat and 6 grams of Sat Fat per ounce. Whether the cheddar cheese is mild, medium or sharp does not seem to matter. The numbers are usually the same. This morning, out of curiosity, I looked up the corresponding numbers for a generic Swiss cheese. They are 8 grams of Total Fat and 5 grams of Sat Fat per ounce (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/39/2).

What I don't know at this point is whether Swiss cheese oils off more than say, mozzarella cheese, or even which metric governs the oiling off event. So, today, while I was at the market, I purchased an 8-ounce block of Swiss cheese. It was the same brand, Crystal Farms, as the low-moisture part-skim and cheddar cheeses that I recently purchased to conduct some tests on the Papa Gino's cloning project I am currently working on. The fat numbers for the Crystan Farms Swiss cheese are the same as mentioned above. I hope soon to conduct some taste and bake tests to see how Swiss cheese performs in relation to mozzarella and cheddar cheeses. The price of the Crystal Farms Swiss cheese was $2.99 for 8 ounces.  

Another major complaint that came through the reviews I read this morning is that the Mack's pizzas are expensive. I suspect that Mack's prices reflect what its competitors charge although it is possible that Mack's has higher ingredients costs. Also, as I understand it, Mack's is only open three months a year. To the extent that Mack's has expenses, like lease expenses or labor costs, that are incurred the entire year and not just for the three months, along with annual start up and shut down expenses, that could account for and justify the higher pizza prices.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 09, 2012, 01:28:32 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Meatballs

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1066 on: June 09, 2012, 01:58:44 PM »
Having been raised on the Jersey Coast I can tell you that seasonal businesses are very common as winter there is nothing like it is in Panama City, Fl, where I hang out now.  Prices of everything in the area are sky-high as its primarily a summer resort and a ghost town in the winter. 

Ron

Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1067 on: June 09, 2012, 02:27:56 PM »
Norma,

I was reading some Yelp and other reviews of the Mack's pizzas this morning, and one of the biggest complaints was that the Mack's pizzas are too oily or greasy. Those of us who have worked with cheddar cheese know how much oil it releases during baking. Cheddar cheese has more fat, in terms of Total Fat and Sat Fat, than mozzarella does, and perhaps that is why it oils off more. For example, a typical mozzarella cheese, whether it is a low-moisture part-skim or whole-milk mozzarella, and whether used alone or in a blend (like the 50/50 East Coast blend from Grande), has 6 grams of Total Fat and 4 grams of Sat Fat per ounce. On occasion, you might find a brand with 5 grams of Total Fat and 3.4 grams of Sat Fat per ounce. By contrast, a mild cheddar cheese, white or colored, typically has 9 grams of Total Fat and 6 grams of Sat Fat per ounce. Whether the cheddar cheese is mild, medium or sharp does not seem to matter. The numbers are usually the same. This morning, out of curiosity, I looked up the corresponding numbers for a generic Swiss cheese. They are 8 grams of Total Fat and 5 grams of Sat Fat per ounce (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/39/2).

What I don't know at this point is whether Swiss cheese oils off more than say, mozzarella cheese, or even which metric governs the oiling off event. So, today, while I was at the market, I purchased an 8-ounce block of Swiss cheese. It was the same brand, Crystal Farms, as the low-moisture part-skim and cheddar cheeses that I recently purchased to conduct some tests on the Papa Gino's cloning project I am currently working on. The fat numbers for the Crystan Farms Swiss cheese are the same as mentioned above. I hope soon to conduct some taste and bake tests to see how Swiss cheese performs in relation to mozzarella and cheddar cheeses. The price of the Crystal Farms Swiss cheese was $2.99 for 8 ounces.  

Another major complaint that came through the reviews I read this morning is that the Mack's pizzas are expensive. I suspect that Mack's prices reflect what its competitors charge although it is possible that Mack's has higher ingredients costs. Also, as I understand it, Mack's is only open three months a year. To the extent that Mack's has expenses, like lease expenses or labor costs, that are incurred the entire year and not just for the three months, along with annual start up and shut down expenses, that could account for and justify the higher pizza prices.

Peter


Peter,

I know some people do say that Mackís pizza is too oily or greasy, but then there are others that love it.  Even Adam Kubanís wife doesnít like how oily or greasy Mackís pies are.  Adam even admitted it himself that he now is a convert to Mackís pizza even if he didnít think it was as good before.  There is something about that oily greasy stuff either you like or donít like.  For me, I think I like it because I have remembered it that way for a long while and also that special tang just gives the whole pizza a better taste for some reason.

Mackís usually gets a lot of return vacationers that do like their pizzas.  Mackís is always really busy in the summer.  The one Mackís location in the middle of the boardwalk is open all year.  The one in Wildwood Crest is not open all year.  There are so many pizza businesses on the boardwalk in Wildwood and you never see any of them really busy except Mackís and Samís.  I think Mackís does enough business in the summer to make up for the winter months when their one location is closed.  If I recall correctly the slices at Mackís are 2.75.  I didnít think that was too bad, for a big slice. I also think a 18Ē whole pizza is around 15.00.  I think Mackís prices are in line with all the other boardwalk pizzas that are decent.   

Interesting when you looked up Swiss cheese it does such a high fat amount.  Lol, you purchased some Crystal Farms Swiss cheese today.  :-D I will be interested in your taste and bake tests to see how Swiss cheese performs in relation to mozzarella and cheddar cheeses in how Swiss does or does not oil off.  The price of your Crystal Farms Swiss cheese is exactly the same price as the Great Lakes cheddar that my daughter purchased for me last evening at Shop Rite.

I did try a Swiss cheese with mozzarella blend at Reply 23 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16823.msg164269.html#msg164269 and as you can see that cheese blend really didnít oil off that much.  I really donít know what brand of Swiss cheese that brand was because I purchased it from a meat and cheese stand at market.  It was a good Swiss cheese though.  I think that blend was about 50/50 and it sure didnít remind me of the taste of Mackís pizza at all, but then there was no cheddar added.  If Joey Mack only uses white cheddar why wouldnít Mackís and Manco & Manco do the same thing?

My daughter asked me Thursday evening where I wanted to go that was pizza related since she wants to drive her new car.  I said right now, not really anywhere.  Wait till she returns home and finds out where I want to go now.   :-D

Norma
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Offline Ev

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1068 on: June 09, 2012, 02:55:22 PM »
You wouldn't go without me, would you? :'( :-D

Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1069 on: June 09, 2012, 03:04:35 PM »
You wouldn't go without me, would you? :'( :-D

Steve,

We can go together if you want.  I wouldn't go without you if you wanted to go on a road trip.  Good to have a "body guard" along also, especially in Philly!  :-D

Norma
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Offline BOARDWALKER

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1070 on: June 09, 2012, 10:25:55 PM »
On the subject of Joey Mack's in South Philly.  It is a horrible, dirty, hole in the wall on Oregon Ave.  His pies are a lot cheaper than the boardwalk Mack's, but that's where it's virtues end.   Last time that i was there, in November, i ordered two plain pies and Joey told me to sit at a table.  He took two pre-made pies out a grease saturated box and threw them in his small  electric non-commercial ovens.  The pies taste nothing like Mack's on the boardwalk, they are bland and very oily.    He even writes "Mack's" on a standard pizza box with a black magic marker.  Most South Philadelphians avoid the place


Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1071 on: June 09, 2012, 10:37:10 PM »
On the subject of Joey Mack's in South Philly.  It is a horrible, dirty, hole in the wall on Oregon Ave.  His pies are a lot cheaper than the boardwalk Mack's, but that's where it's virtues end.   Last time that i was there, in November, i ordered two plain pies and Joey told me to sit at a table.  He took two pre-made pies out a grease saturated box and threw them in his small  electric non-commercial ovens.  The pies taste nothing like Mack's on the boardwalk, they are bland and very oily.    He even writes "Mack's" on a standard pizza box with a black magic marker.  Most South Philadelphians avoid the place



BOARDWALKER,

Thanks for posting about Joey Mackís in South Philly.  I had some hopes that maybe his pies would taste like Mackís and also he would use the same cheese.  Do you know if Joey Mack uses the same cheese as Mackís does?

I did read some reviews that Joey Mackís was dirty, but didnít know he didnít bake in regular deck ovens.  Thanks for the tip!

Norma
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Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1072 on: June 10, 2012, 10:14:09 AM »
Norma

I picked up some Great Lakes cheddar today and IMHO there's nothing special about it. I was kind of surprised to see that both their sharp and ex-sharp were orange rather than white. Most premium cheddars are presented in their white version, seldom see primo cheddar in orange. Even the ex-sharp was kinda mild tasting, I'd much rather have one of Cabot's or McCadam's cheeses over this. I have a pound of ex-sharp, a pound of sharp, a half pound of mild cheddar and a half pound of Monterey Jack. Looks like mac n cheese will be on the menu this week. :(

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1073 on: June 10, 2012, 11:55:35 AM »
Norma

I picked up some Great Lakes cheddar today and IMHO there's nothing special about it. I was kind of surprised to see that both their sharp and ex-sharp were orange rather than white. Most premium cheddars are presented in their white version, seldom see primo cheddar in orange. Even the ex-sharp was kinda mild tasting, I'd much rather have one of Cabot's or McCadam's cheeses over this. I have a pound of ex-sharp, a pound of sharp, a half pound of mild cheddar and a half pound of Monterey Jack. Looks like mac n cheese will be on the menu this week. :(

Dave,

My daughter picked me up some Great Lakes white cheddar in Wildwood and will be bringing it home today.  I have also tried Cabot's on this thread. 


Sorry you didn't like the taste of the Great Lakes cheddar.

Norma
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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1074 on: June 10, 2012, 11:56:06 AM »
I will be interested in your taste and bake tests to see how Swiss cheese performs in relation to mozzarella and cheddar cheeses in how Swiss does or does not oil off.

Norma,

I ran a few tests using the low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese, the mild cheddar cheese (it was orange from the annatto coloring), and Swiss cheese. All three cheeses are the Crystal Farms brand and have the fat profiles as previously mentioned.

For the first test, I shredded maybe a couple of grams of each of the three cheeses just to sample them raw and compare their flavors. The three cheeses had distinctive flavors, with the mozzarella cheese being the mildest tasting, followed by the Swiss cheese, and, lastly, the cheddar cheese, which had the strongest flavor. I also made a blend of the three cheeses, with about 4 grams of each, and tasted that blend raw. That blend had a distinctive flavor profile that was unlike any of the individual cheeses but the cheese that stood out the most was the cheddar cheese. For comparison purposes, I made a similar blend and baked it in a pie tin in my countertop toaster oven at around 350 degrees F until the blend melted, about 4 minutes. I then tasted that cooked blend. Again, the blend had its own unique flavor profile but it was clear that the cheddar cheese and the Swiss cheese dominated the flavor. However, I can't really say that I could detect the Swiss cheese as such, only that there was a flavor in the blend that was different and stronger than the flavor of the mozzarella cheese. I don't think that I would have been able to pick out the Swiss cheese in a blind test, at least at the level of that cheese in the blend I made.

As the above bake test was being conducted, I also looked for the degree of oiling off of the cheese blend. There was clearly some oiling off, with some fat on the top surface of the cheese blend and also under the cheese blend, but, at the amounts of cheeses used in the blend, the oiling off was not all that much. To get a better sense of the oiling off propensity of each cheese, I conducted another test. For that test, I shredded about 7 grams of each of the three cheeses and formed them into small mounds that were placed in my pie tin with a fair amount of spacing between the mounds. I baked the three cheeses and then observed the oiling off of the three cheeses. The mozzarella cheese had the least oiling off, followed by the Swiss cheese and, lastly, the cheddar cheese (the oil had an orange tint), which had the most oiling off. These results would seem to suggest that high fat cheeses have a greater tendency to oil off than cheeses with lower amounts of fat. However, there are other factors that might be implicated. For example, the three cheeses also contain different amounts of moisture. There was no way for me to calculate the water content of the three cheeses that I used, because the Nutrition Facts do not specify those numbers, but the generic numbers for the water content is different for the three cheeses. For example, a generic low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese contains about 46% water, generic cheddar cheese contains about 37% water, and Swiss cheese likewise contains about 37% water. Even if water content is a factor in the way that cheeses oil off, the fact remains that the cheeses with the highest fat contents appear to oil off the most.

I think the best and truest test would be to make a pizza with a blend of the three cheeses. Maybe a blend with equal amounts of the three cheeses, or maybe with an overweighting of the Swiss cheese, would be a good place to start, mainly to see which flavors dominate and also to see if the Swiss cheese can be detected in the baked pizza. If it can't, especially in a blind test, then one would have to question whether Mack's would be using such a cheese in a blend for its pizzas. Of course, this is a logical conclusion that might not hold up in the real world in the case of Mack's.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 10, 2012, 12:38:54 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1075 on: June 10, 2012, 12:32:32 PM »
Norma,

I ran a few tests using the low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese, the mild cheddar cheese (it was orange from the annatto coloring), and Swiss cheese. All three cheeses are the Crystal Farms brand and have the fat profiles as previously mentioned.

For the first test, I shredded maybe a couple of grams of each of the three cheeses just to sample them raw and compare their flavors. The three cheeses had distinctive flavors, with the mozzarella cheese being the mildest tasting, followed by the Swiss cheese, and, lastly, the cheddar cheese, which had the strongest flavor. I also made a blend of the three cheeses, with about 4 grams of each, and tasted that blend raw. That blend had a distinctive flavor profile that was unlike any of the individual cheeses but the cheese that stood out the most was the cheddar cheese. For comparison purposes, I made a similar blend and baked it in a pie tin in my countertop toaster oven at around 350 degrees F until the blend melted, about 4 minutes. I then tasted that cooked blend. Again, the blend had its own unique flavor profile but it was clear that the cheddar cheese and the Swiss cheese dominated the flavor. However, I can't really say that I could detect the Swiss cheese as such, only that there was a flavor in the blend that was different and stronger than the flavor of the mozzarella cheese. I don't think that I would have been able to pick out the Swiss cheese in a blind test, at least at the level of that cheese in the blend I made.

As the above bake test was being conducted, I also looked for the degree of oiling off of the cheese blend. There was clearly some oiling off, with some fat on the top surface of the cheese blend and also under the cheese blend, but, at the amounts of cheeses used in the blend, the oiling off was not all that much. To get a better sense of the oiling off propensity of each cheese, I conducted another test. For that test, I shredded about 7 grams of each of the three cheeses and formed them into small mounds that were placed in my pie tin with a fair amount of spacing between the mounds. I baked the three cheeses and then observed the oiling off of the three cheeses. The mozzarella cheese had the least oiling off, followed by the cheddar cheese (the oil had an orange tint) and, finally, the Swiss cheese. These results would seem to suggest that high fat cheeses have a greater tendency to oil off than cheeses with lower amounts of fat. However, there are other factors that might be implicated. For example, the three cheeses also contain different amounts of moisture. There was no way for me to calculate the water content of the three cheeses that I used, because the Nutrition Facts do not specify those numbers, but the generic numbers for the water content is different for the three cheeses. For example, a generic low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese contains about 46% water, generic cheddar cheese contains about 37% water, and Swiss cheese likewise contains about 37% water. Even if water content is a factor in the way that cheeses oil off, the fact remains that the cheeses with the highest fat contents appear to oil off the most.

I think the best and truest test would be to make a pizza with a blend of the three cheeses. Maybe a blend with equal amounts of the three cheeses, or maybe with an overweighting of the Swiss cheese, would be a good place to start, mainly to see which flavors dominate and also to see if the Swiss cheese can be detected in the baked pizza. If it can't, especially in a blind test, then one would have to question whether Mack's would be using such a cheese in a blend for its pizzas. Of course, this is a logical conclusion that might not hold up in the real world in the case of Mack's.

Peter

Peter,

Thank you for conducting the tests on the raw samples and also baked samples of mozzarella, Swiss, and cheddar and explaining what you did.  I was surprised to hear that the Swiss cheese did have the most oiling off in your tests.  I can understand that different moisture contents also might affect oiling off.  I know the brands of blends I use for my pizzas at market do have a fairly high amount of oiling off.  The Nasonville block of cheddar I purchased doesnít seem to have a lot of oiling off and for some reason after it is grated wants to form in clumps and seems very moist.  I am not happy with that, but donít know if the Nasonville cheddar was too moist, old or what.  When I took the packing off of the Nasonville cheddar it was very moist.   To give you another example about moisture in mozzarellas, my Bella Fran whole milk mozzarella is moister than the Foremost Farms 1950 brand of part skim I use at market.  The Bella Fran has a much better taste when tasted plain too, but the Bell Fran mozzarella does oil off more if used plain without the Foremost Farms 1950 brand of part skim.

I appreciate it very much that you did those tests, but I am almost convinced that Mackís is just using cheddar and donít think I will play around with blends with Swiss.  There are just too many brands and types of different mozzarellas, cheddars, and Swiss cheeses to try and get a blend right.     

BTW, my daughter sent me two pictures from her cell phone to my cell phone last evening of one slice of pepperoni pizza and a picture inside of Mackís and how slow Mackís looked at Wildwood Crest.  I tried to send the pictures to my email address, but wasnít successful.  I will have to get my daughter to show me how to do that when she gets home.  I could do that before, but donít know what I am doing wrong.  I think what most people donít realize about Mackís is although they didnít look really busy when my daughter was there (around 6:30 pm), she said the piemen were really busy making pies for deliveries.  I know Mackís does a lot of business in deliveries to all the vacationers in Wildwood.  My daughter said the taste of Mackís pizza was still the same and was very greasy.  She said the pepperoni slice was 3.00 and a whole cheese pie is 15.75.  She also said the one man that wasnít making pizzas at Mackís last evening was going around and making sure the piemen were doing everything right and also hollering if things werenít right.  I donít think I have ever seen that man before, but guess he could be a manager.   

Norma
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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1076 on: June 10, 2012, 01:03:43 PM »
Norma,

Your comment on the extent of oiling off of the Swiss cheese prompted me to review what I said in my last post, where I saw that I had the order of the Swiss cheese and cheddar cheese reversed in relation to the extent of oiling off. I have now corrected that post to indicate that the cheddar cheese had the most oiling off of the three cheeses. Thank you for your comments that made me go back to my last post.

I don't work with cheeses to anywhere the degree that you do but cheeses do lose moisture with time, and especially if left uncovered at room temperature or exposed to drying room temperatures often enough. As a simple example, when I was shredding the different cheeses, there were some straggler shreds that ended up on my work surface and went unnoticed. Later, as I was cleaning up, I saw those straggler shreds and noticed that they had become brittle and would break into small fragments. All three of the cheeses I used were firm and had the same general appearance and texture, even when shredding. However, I am sure that there are a lot of variations from brand to brand and I know from reports I have read that some cheeses often do not comply with federal regulations that govern the permitted water content. The concern is that producers do not load up their products with water in order to maximize profits.

Since you mentioned the whole-milk mozzarella cheese, I went to the nutritiondata.self. com website and calculated the water content of a generic whole-milk low moisture mozzarella cheese. It is 47.3%. For a generic whole-milk mozzarella cheese with higher water content, the amount of water is 50%.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1077 on: June 10, 2012, 02:32:08 PM »
 
Norma,

Your comment on the extent of oiling off of the Swiss cheese prompted me to review what I said in my last post, where I saw that I had the order of the Swiss cheese and cheddar cheese reversed in relation to the extent of oiling off. I have now corrected that post to indicate that the cheddar cheese had the most oiling off of the three cheeses. Thank you for your comments that made me go back to my last post.

I don't work with cheeses to anywhere the degree that you do but cheeses do lose moisture with time, and especially if left uncovered at room temperature or exposed to drying room temperatures often enough. As a simple example, when I was shredding the different cheeses, there were some straggler shreds that ended up on my work surface and went unnoticed. Later, as I was cleaning up, I saw those straggler shreds and noticed that they had become brittle and would break into small fragments. All three of the cheeses I used were firm and had the same general appearance and texture, even when shredding. However, I am sure that there are a lot of variations from brand to brand and I know from reports I have read that some cheeses often do not comply with federal regulations that govern the permitted water content. The concern is that producers do not load up their products with water in order to maximize profits.

Since you mentioned the whole-milk mozzarella cheese, I went to the nutritiondata.self. com website and calculated the water content of a generic whole-milk low moisture mozzarella cheese. It is 47.3%. For a generic whole-milk mozzarella cheese with higher water content, the amount of water is 50%.

Peter

Peter,

I donít really work with many Swiss cheeses for pizzas, but do eat Swiss cheese from time to time.  I find that they seem to be drier than some other cheeses.  When I made the one pizza with Swiss in the blend I could taste the Swiss, but it wasnít overpowering.  I have never tasted any Swiss in a Mackís pizza that I am aware of, but that doesnít rule out the possibility that they might add some Swiss, because it might not be able to be detected in small amounts.  

I have also seen how fast grated cheeses dry out.  If Steve or I might accidentally scatter some cheese and some might drop on the flour or beside the stand that the oven sits on, it can dry out fairly fast.  

Interesting that the three cheeses you used were all firm and had the same general appearance and texture.  I wouldnít have expected that, but maybe because they all are from Crystal Farms that is why they might be all the same.  I didnít know that reports say some cheeses donít comply with federal regulations that govern the permitted water content.  I sure canít figure out why that Nasonville cheddar wants to clump after grating, but also found that to be true with Grande if there was some leftover from one week to the next.  My blend does not clump when some is left over from week to week.  It stays the same in the food safe containers with the lids on.  The Nasonville cheddar does clump in one day though, which is much faster than Grande.  When I did use Grande I always purchased it in loafs and grated it the day before market.

Thank you for going to the nutritiondata.self. com website and calculating the water contents of a generic whole-milk low moisture mozzarella cheese and a generic whole-milk mozzarella cheese.  Those numbers are interesting to see.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 10, 2012, 05:15:38 PM by norma427 »
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1078 on: June 10, 2012, 04:14:24 PM »
Dave,

 


Sorry you didn't like the taste of the Great Lakes cheddar.

Norma

Just trying to save others from the same fate! :angel:

Offline Ev

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1079 on: June 10, 2012, 04:55:43 PM »
Just to note, FWIW, the sample that Norma tried was a white cheddar, not yellow.


 

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