Author Topic: NJ Boardwalk Pizza  (Read 243544 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1075 on: June 10, 2012, 12:32:32 PM »
Norma,

I ran a few tests using the low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese, the mild cheddar cheese (it was orange from the annatto coloring), and Swiss cheese. All three cheeses are the Crystal Farms brand and have the fat profiles as previously mentioned.

For the first test, I shredded maybe a couple of grams of each of the three cheeses just to sample them raw and compare their flavors. The three cheeses had distinctive flavors, with the mozzarella cheese being the mildest tasting, followed by the Swiss cheese, and, lastly, the cheddar cheese, which had the strongest flavor. I also made a blend of the three cheeses, with about 4 grams of each, and tasted that blend raw. That blend had a distinctive flavor profile that was unlike any of the individual cheeses but the cheese that stood out the most was the cheddar cheese. For comparison purposes, I made a similar blend and baked it in a pie tin in my countertop toaster oven at around 350 degrees F until the blend melted, about 4 minutes. I then tasted that cooked blend. Again, the blend had its own unique flavor profile but it was clear that the cheddar cheese and the Swiss cheese dominated the flavor. However, I can't really say that I could detect the Swiss cheese as such, only that there was a flavor in the blend that was different and stronger than the flavor of the mozzarella cheese. I don't think that I would have been able to pick out the Swiss cheese in a blind test, at least at the level of that cheese in the blend I made.

As the above bake test was being conducted, I also looked for the degree of oiling off of the cheese blend. There was clearly some oiling off, with some fat on the top surface of the cheese blend and also under the cheese blend, but, at the amounts of cheeses used in the blend, the oiling off was not all that much. To get a better sense of the oiling off propensity of each cheese, I conducted another test. For that test, I shredded about 7 grams of each of the three cheeses and formed them into small mounds that were placed in my pie tin with a fair amount of spacing between the mounds. I baked the three cheeses and then observed the oiling off of the three cheeses. The mozzarella cheese had the least oiling off, followed by the cheddar cheese (the oil had an orange tint) and, finally, the Swiss cheese. These results would seem to suggest that high fat cheeses have a greater tendency to oil off than cheeses with lower amounts of fat. However, there are other factors that might be implicated. For example, the three cheeses also contain different amounts of moisture. There was no way for me to calculate the water content of the three cheeses that I used, because the Nutrition Facts do not specify those numbers, but the generic numbers for the water content is different for the three cheeses. For example, a generic low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese contains about 46% water, generic cheddar cheese contains about 37% water, and Swiss cheese likewise contains about 37% water. Even if water content is a factor in the way that cheeses oil off, the fact remains that the cheeses with the highest fat contents appear to oil off the most.

I think the best and truest test would be to make a pizza with a blend of the three cheeses. Maybe a blend with equal amounts of the three cheeses, or maybe with an overweighting of the Swiss cheese, would be a good place to start, mainly to see which flavors dominate and also to see if the Swiss cheese can be detected in the baked pizza. If it can't, especially in a blind test, then one would have to question whether Mack's would be using such a cheese in a blend for its pizzas. Of course, this is a logical conclusion that might not hold up in the real world in the case of Mack's.

Peter

Peter,

Thank you for conducting the tests on the raw samples and also baked samples of mozzarella, Swiss, and cheddar and explaining what you did.  I was surprised to hear that the Swiss cheese did have the most oiling off in your tests.  I can understand that different moisture contents also might affect oiling off.  I know the brands of blends I use for my pizzas at market do have a fairly high amount of oiling off.  The Nasonville block of cheddar I purchased doesnít seem to have a lot of oiling off and for some reason after it is grated wants to form in clumps and seems very moist.  I am not happy with that, but donít know if the Nasonville cheddar was too moist, old or what.  When I took the packing off of the Nasonville cheddar it was very moist.   To give you another example about moisture in mozzarellas, my Bella Fran whole milk mozzarella is moister than the Foremost Farms 1950 brand of part skim I use at market.  The Bella Fran has a much better taste when tasted plain too, but the Bell Fran mozzarella does oil off more if used plain without the Foremost Farms 1950 brand of part skim.

I appreciate it very much that you did those tests, but I am almost convinced that Mackís is just using cheddar and donít think I will play around with blends with Swiss.  There are just too many brands and types of different mozzarellas, cheddars, and Swiss cheeses to try and get a blend right.     

BTW, my daughter sent me two pictures from her cell phone to my cell phone last evening of one slice of pepperoni pizza and a picture inside of Mackís and how slow Mackís looked at Wildwood Crest.  I tried to send the pictures to my email address, but wasnít successful.  I will have to get my daughter to show me how to do that when she gets home.  I could do that before, but donít know what I am doing wrong.  I think what most people donít realize about Mackís is although they didnít look really busy when my daughter was there (around 6:30 pm), she said the piemen were really busy making pies for deliveries.  I know Mackís does a lot of business in deliveries to all the vacationers in Wildwood.  My daughter said the taste of Mackís pizza was still the same and was very greasy.  She said the pepperoni slice was 3.00 and a whole cheese pie is 15.75.  She also said the one man that wasnít making pizzas at Mackís last evening was going around and making sure the piemen were doing everything right and also hollering if things werenít right.  I donít think I have ever seen that man before, but guess he could be a manager.   

Norma


Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23446
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1076 on: June 10, 2012, 01:03:43 PM »
Norma,

Your comment on the extent of oiling off of the Swiss cheese prompted me to review what I said in my last post, where I saw that I had the order of the Swiss cheese and cheddar cheese reversed in relation to the extent of oiling off. I have now corrected that post to indicate that the cheddar cheese had the most oiling off of the three cheeses. Thank you for your comments that made me go back to my last post.

I don't work with cheeses to anywhere the degree that you do but cheeses do lose moisture with time, and especially if left uncovered at room temperature or exposed to drying room temperatures often enough. As a simple example, when I was shredding the different cheeses, there were some straggler shreds that ended up on my work surface and went unnoticed. Later, as I was cleaning up, I saw those straggler shreds and noticed that they had become brittle and would break into small fragments. All three of the cheeses I used were firm and had the same general appearance and texture, even when shredding. However, I am sure that there are a lot of variations from brand to brand and I know from reports I have read that some cheeses often do not comply with federal regulations that govern the permitted water content. The concern is that producers do not load up their products with water in order to maximize profits.

Since you mentioned the whole-milk mozzarella cheese, I went to the nutritiondata.self. com website and calculated the water content of a generic whole-milk low moisture mozzarella cheese. It is 47.3%. For a generic whole-milk mozzarella cheese with higher water content, the amount of water is 50%.

Peter

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1077 on: June 10, 2012, 02:32:08 PM »
 
Norma,

Your comment on the extent of oiling off of the Swiss cheese prompted me to review what I said in my last post, where I saw that I had the order of the Swiss cheese and cheddar cheese reversed in relation to the extent of oiling off. I have now corrected that post to indicate that the cheddar cheese had the most oiling off of the three cheeses. Thank you for your comments that made me go back to my last post.

I don't work with cheeses to anywhere the degree that you do but cheeses do lose moisture with time, and especially if left uncovered at room temperature or exposed to drying room temperatures often enough. As a simple example, when I was shredding the different cheeses, there were some straggler shreds that ended up on my work surface and went unnoticed. Later, as I was cleaning up, I saw those straggler shreds and noticed that they had become brittle and would break into small fragments. All three of the cheeses I used were firm and had the same general appearance and texture, even when shredding. However, I am sure that there are a lot of variations from brand to brand and I know from reports I have read that some cheeses often do not comply with federal regulations that govern the permitted water content. The concern is that producers do not load up their products with water in order to maximize profits.

Since you mentioned the whole-milk mozzarella cheese, I went to the nutritiondata.self. com website and calculated the water content of a generic whole-milk low moisture mozzarella cheese. It is 47.3%. For a generic whole-milk mozzarella cheese with higher water content, the amount of water is 50%.

Peter

Peter,

I donít really work with many Swiss cheeses for pizzas, but do eat Swiss cheese from time to time.  I find that they seem to be drier than some other cheeses.  When I made the one pizza with Swiss in the blend I could taste the Swiss, but it wasnít overpowering.  I have never tasted any Swiss in a Mackís pizza that I am aware of, but that doesnít rule out the possibility that they might add some Swiss, because it might not be able to be detected in small amounts.  

I have also seen how fast grated cheeses dry out.  If Steve or I might accidentally scatter some cheese and some might drop on the flour or beside the stand that the oven sits on, it can dry out fairly fast.  

Interesting that the three cheeses you used were all firm and had the same general appearance and texture.  I wouldnít have expected that, but maybe because they all are from Crystal Farms that is why they might be all the same.  I didnít know that reports say some cheeses donít comply with federal regulations that govern the permitted water content.  I sure canít figure out why that Nasonville cheddar wants to clump after grating, but also found that to be true with Grande if there was some leftover from one week to the next.  My blend does not clump when some is left over from week to week.  It stays the same in the food safe containers with the lids on.  The Nasonville cheddar does clump in one day though, which is much faster than Grande.  When I did use Grande I always purchased it in loafs and grated it the day before market.

Thank you for going to the nutritiondata.self. com website and calculating the water contents of a generic whole-milk low moisture mozzarella cheese and a generic whole-milk mozzarella cheese.  Those numbers are interesting to see.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 10, 2012, 05:15:38 PM by norma427 »

Offline dmcavanagh

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 1912
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1078 on: June 10, 2012, 04:14:24 PM »
Dave,

 


Sorry you didn't like the taste of the Great Lakes cheddar.

Norma

Just trying to save others from the same fate! :angel:
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014

Offline Ev

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1826
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Lancaster Co. Pa.
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1079 on: June 10, 2012, 04:55:43 PM »
Just to note, FWIW, the sample that Norma tried was a white cheddar, not yellow.

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1080 on: June 10, 2012, 05:32:48 PM »

My daughter is home now and this is what the Great Lakes White Sharp Cheddar looks like that she purchased in Wildwood.  The total fat content is 14%.  I tried different cheddars before on a Mackís attempt and most of the time after the bake the cheddar taste changed.

Norma

Offline dmcavanagh

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 1912
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1081 on: June 10, 2012, 06:37:46 PM »
The white was mild cheddar, at least in my neck of the woods.
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1082 on: June 10, 2012, 08:15:22 PM »
The white was mild cheddar, at least in my neck of the woods.

Dave,

Different areas of the country must sell different colors of cheddar, as Peter reported before he does have problems finding some cheddars in the white form.  

This is an article about oiling off of mozzarella and cheddar.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0260877403001870

Norma
« Last Edit: June 10, 2012, 08:17:29 PM by norma427 »

Offline dmcavanagh

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 1912
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1083 on: June 10, 2012, 08:32:30 PM »
I wonder why they make both colors and sell different ones in different ares? Was the sharp and ex-sharp good or were they kinda mild?
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1084 on: June 10, 2012, 09:04:14 PM »
I wonder why they make both colors and sell different ones in different ares? Was the sharp and ex-sharp good or were they kinda mild?

Dave,

I really donít know why they make both colors of cheddars.  I do know different areas of the country might like yellow cheddars, or a blend, for something like Tacos, or Mexican food.  I think I read somewhere that it doesnít matter if the cheddar is white or yellow in the taste of the cheddar though.    

Wow, to answer you question about the if the sharp and extra-sharp were good or were they kind of mild is a tough question to answer.  In our area there are so many kinds of white cheddars that some are very sharp and some are not.  I did taste the cheddar my daughter brought back and thought it did kind of have a tang and was good, but since all of our tastes are different, maybe you wouldnít have thought the same thing.  I really donít think the Great Lakes is really sharp in comparison to some other cheddars I have tasted.  I have some State Brand of white cheddar at market now and think it almost like the Great Lakes in taste, but they both might melt differently and taste different when baked on a pizza.  I am not sure what fat content the State Brand is.  I am going to wait until next week to make an attempt on another Mackís pizza.

Norma

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23446
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1085 on: June 10, 2012, 09:20:40 PM »
Norma,

You are correct about the white and orange cheddar cheeses tasting the same. I reported this recently after reading the FAQs at the Crystal Farms website at http://www.crystalfarmscheese.com/faq/. Note the question under Cheese FAQs about the differences between the white and yellow/orange cheddar cheeses.

Peter

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1086 on: June 10, 2012, 10:00:24 PM »
Norma,

You are correct about the white and orange cheddar cheeses tasting the same. I reported this recently after reading the FAQs at the Crystal Farms website at http://www.crystalfarmscheese.com/faq/. Note the question under Cheese FAQs about the differences between the white and yellow/orange cheddar cheeses.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for posting the link again after you read the FAQs at the Crystal Farms website.  I see there is no difference in taste in the white and yellow cheddars.  I think I read somewhere on the web that cheeses were different colors from different times of the year and from what the cows ate.  I think that is why they started adding Annatto, to even up the color of the cheeses.

Norma

Offline dmcavanagh

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 1912
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1087 on: June 10, 2012, 10:42:29 PM »
The orange is just food coloring added to the cheese. Orange cheese is very popular in Canada. I spend a lot of time in extreme northern NY where cheese curds are very popular (and good). Just about all are white, but if you cross the boarder to Canada you will seldom find white cheese curds, they are almost always orange. Funny how different areas prefer different things. Bottom line, orange or white I still prefer a lot of other brands over Great Lakes. ::)
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014

Offline dmcavanagh

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 1912
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1088 on: June 10, 2012, 10:47:57 PM »
Norma

I just noticed that your packages are a little different then mine on the Great Lakes cheese. My packages say New York under the word natural, and are aged 9 months. Yours just say natural and state they are aged 6 months. Hard to compare two diffferent products.
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1089 on: June 11, 2012, 08:11:05 AM »
Dave,

I donít know if you read desant89ís Reply at 976 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9068.msg179771/topicseen.html#msg179771 or not, but he was given a sample of Great Lakes cheddar.  In Reply 971 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9068.msg179103.html#msg179103 desant89 posted that it might be a 100% brand of cheddar that Manco & Manco uses.  Desant89 tried out the Great Lakes cheddar and did like that cheddar on a pie, but didnít say it tasted exactly like a Manco & Manco pizza.  I donít know if what is sold at the retail level is the same as what is sold though distributors.  Since your cheddar was yellow and aged a different amount of time, I am sure Great Lakes makes many types of cheddar both for retail and only sold only though distributors.  If you look at other posts in the same area as the above posts you can see more what was posted, if you didnĎt already read those posts.  

If Annatto is looked at in Wikipedia it can been seen that Annatto is added to cheese to make it the yellow color.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annatto  It can also be seen why they started adding Annatto to cheese.

I am going to try the Great Lakes cheddar on a Mackís attempt either next week or the following week.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 11, 2012, 08:12:43 AM by norma427 »

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1090 on: June 11, 2012, 11:34:30 AM »
These are the two pictures my daughter took with her cell phone inside Mack in Wildwood Crest.  This Mackís was the newly remodeled one.  It can be seen how greasy the pepperoni slice was, but my daughter, like me, likes that greasy goodness.  I sure wish I could have at least had a bite of that slice.  ;D

Norma

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1091 on: June 11, 2012, 11:35:24 AM »
Norma


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1092 on: June 11, 2012, 06:37:42 PM »
Later this afternoon while I was at market, I received a phone call from Steve at ConAgra Foods.  He said he was on his way to bring me the sample of MFB and he was coming to where I lived.  I told him I was at market and asked him if he could bring the MFB to market.  I was surprised that the sample was a 50 lb. sample of MFB.  I hadnít received any other emails or phone calls from Steve, so really didnít think I would get a sample of MFB. 

Steve was a very interesting man to talk to and he asked me about my dough, sauce and what cheeses I use on my pizzas.  I told him the brand of sauce I use and he said that is the best and is hard to beat. He did taste my sauce and said it was very good.  He also tasted my blend of cheeses and really liked them too.  I didnít know ConAgra Foods carries Saputo cheese.  Steve said they also has a gold Saputo that is just about like Grande cheese.  I didnít know ConAgra Foods also carried frozen dough balls.  We talked about different kinds of blends of cheeses and what some pizzerias use.  I wish I would have had more time to talk to Steve, but 5:00 pm approached fast.

Now what I am wondering if I can just melt the MFB and use it in the same weights in the formulation as olive oil or other oils.  I would guess it would be something like lard.  I did ask Steve what adjustments I would need to make when using the MFB for pizza dough, but he didnít know.

Norma

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1093 on: June 11, 2012, 06:38:05 PM »
Norma

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23446
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1094 on: June 11, 2012, 07:53:05 PM »
Now what I am wondering if I can just melt the MFB and use it in the same weights in the formulation as olive oil or other oils.  I would guess it would be something like lard.  I did ask Steve what adjustments I would need to make when using the MFB for pizza dough, but he didnít know.

Norma

Norma,

You should be able to replace the oil in the dough formulation with the MFB on an equal-weight basis. Since the product is essentially a shortening, it contains no water so you shouldn't have to make any hydration adjustments. I think you should be able to use the MFB in either the solid or melted state, but I think I would go with the solid state. I say that because the solid MFB should create air pockets in the dough as it melts during baking. I think that is what is intended by Wesson.

I found the ingredients list and nutrition information for the MFB at http://www.conagrafoodservice.com/ProductDetail.do;jsessionid=33758431EC0708E4DE08D2E6B1E31816?productUpc=2700073651. You might ask for the specs for the product in case you need them.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 11, 2012, 08:05:32 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1095 on: June 11, 2012, 08:55:23 PM »
Norma,

You should be able to replace the oil in the dough formulation with the MFB on an equal-weight basis. Since the product is essentially a shortening, it contains no water so you shouldn't have to make any hydration adjustments. I think you should be able to use the MFB in either the solid or melted state, but I think I would go with the solid state. I say that because the solid MFB should create air pockets in the dough as it melts during baking. I think that is what is intended by Wesson.

I found the ingredients list and nutrition information for the MFB at http://www.conagrafoodservice.com/ProductDetail.do;jsessionid=33758431EC0708E4DE08D2E6B1E31816?productUpc=2700073651. You might ask for the specs for the product in case you need them.

Peter


Peter,

Thanks for posting that I should be able to replace the oil in the dough formulations with the MFB on an equal-weight basis and finding the link for the ingredients list and nutrition information.  It sounds interesting that the solid MFB should create air pockets in dough as it melts during baking.  I will try to get specs for the MFB in case I need them.

Norma

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1096 on: June 17, 2012, 05:56:41 PM »
Another Mackís attempted dough was mixed today with the same formulation I used the last time, but this time the MFB was substituted for oil in the formula.  I didnít melt the MFB, but just added it to the flour.  The dough mixed well in my Kitchen Aid mixer on speed 1. 

Norma

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1097 on: June 18, 2012, 05:58:43 PM »
I had asked Steve from ConAgra for spec sheets for the MFB.  This is all he sent me. This sheet doesnít show anymore than what the box did.  Is there anything else I should try to find out about the MFB?  Steve is from ACOSTA Venture Sales Group.  I never heard of the ACOSTA Venture Sales Group.  I guess this is who the Acosta Venture Sales Group is.  http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20120315006211/en/Acosta-Sales-Marketing-Enters-Food-Service-Channel


Norma

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1098 on: June 19, 2012, 09:32:44 PM »
Steve and I made the Mackís attempt at the very end of the day, because we were busy the rest of the day and also were trying to fit in other experiments.  We were out of regular dough balls and Steve had mixed the Gangi sauce and shredded the Great Lakes white cheddar.  The Mackís clone dough ball was left out to ferment longer than I wanted and it was warm at market.  The dough ball did open up very easily.  Being tried, I forgot to press on the dough ball at all.  I just opened the dough ball normally.  After the pizza was dressed and in the oven, I remembered when I first looked in the oven and saw the rim rising, that I had forgot to press on the dough ball before I opened it. 

The Mackís attempt did give me some surprises though, one in that there was good oven spring, the taste of the crust was better than usual, the crumb had a much different texture, and the bottom crust wasnít as crispy as normal.  Steve and I really liked this Mackís attempt even though the crust wasnít right.  We both thought the crust was really different. 

The Gangi sauce and the Great Lakes white cheddar really went together well too.  The cheese wasnít as greasy like a Mackís pizza is and the tang wasnít enough, but Steve and I both thought it tasted as good, or better than a Mackís pizza.  The pizza did taste something like a Mackís pizza.

I donít know if the MBF made that much of a difference in the crust, but this pizza in texture and taste werenít anything like my attempts with the same formulation.

Norma

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 24198
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1099 on: June 19, 2012, 09:33:35 PM »
Norma