Author Topic: NJ Boardwalk Pizza  (Read 193223 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1840 on: April 11, 2014, 10:48:15 PM »
LOL Norma!!!  I'm fine, thanks, and so are Ann and Kenny.  My shoulder was a little sore from kneading my own dough all winter long and, yeah, shoveling too much snow.  All good now, however, except my trucks always seem to give me bloody knuckles no matter how dry my skin is.   :)

Speaking of which, I did notice, as this long, hard winter progressed, the store-bought King Arthur bread flour I normally use was getting drier and drier due to the ongoing lack of moisture in the air.  For that very reason, I always seemed to be adjusting the water content upward.  As of right now, I'm still using about 25% more water in my dough mixes than I had before.  It could still be awhile as the weather warms, the average humidity increases, and that dry flour cycles out of the system.  Perhaps you may have been affected by this phenomenon as well depending on how and where your suppliers warehouse their products.   ;D

Pete,

Glad to hear you, Ann and Kenny are doing fine.  I know about shoveling too much snow.  I got my snow-blower finally repaired right but then it didn't snow enough to use it.
 
I also had been adding more water to most of my doughs but have stopped that recently.  Wow, 25% additional water was a lot to add.  My distributor does not have any heat in their warehouses where I purchase my flours.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1841 on: May 05, 2014, 08:55:15 PM »
What's new in the Wildwoods for Summer 2014

http://www.wildwood365.net/2014/05/whats-new-in-wildwoods-for-summer-2014.html   

New tram cars and even this.  A new Domino's at a new location, and also a “pizza theater” to watch how everything is made.  http://www.shorenewstoday.com/snt/news/index.php/wildwood-mainmenu/wildwood-business/48404-dominos-opens-at-new-wildwood-location.html  Might have to check out Domino's if I get to Wildwood this summer.

Norma
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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1842 on: May 05, 2014, 09:19:31 PM »
Norma,

That is an interesting article on Domino's. I have read about Domino's move to add some pizzazz to its in-store pizza production by introducing their "pizza theater" concept but I wonder whether their pizza makers will be doing any hand tossing of the skins as they do at Manco's and Manco's and its predecessor. Domino's promotes its "hand tossed" crusts but the only times I have seen skins actually tossed in in an occasional video where the pizza maker was showing off for the most part. Shaping skins on the bench and dressing and baking them in a conveyor oven, if that is what they will be doing at the new Domino's, doesn't strike me as being "pizza theater".

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1843 on: May 05, 2014, 09:34:17 PM »
Peter,

This is Domino's Wildwood facebook page photosstream. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dominos-Pizza-Wildwood/247950841891695?id=247950841891695&sk=photos_stream  I don't know if the pizza makers will be doing any hand tossing of the skins as Mack's does.  I think the owner said the other Domino's he owned was ranked number 2 in sales before, and now he hopes the new one will be ranked number 1.  I will watch their facebook page.  Maybe you might want to give them a call to find any any details that you might want to know. 

Visitors and people that live in Wildwood do eat a lot of pizzas.   :-D

It has been a long while since I ate any Domino's pizzas.  I even forget what they taste like.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1844 on: May 23, 2014, 04:32:59 AM »
On Wildwood 365 facebook page posted on May 21, 2014 they posted a photo of Two pipin' hot slices of pep...err...we mean...Can you TASTE it. https://www.facebook.com/Wildwood365 There were 677 likes as of yesterday.  I thought the comments were interesting.  I still wonder why so many people like Mack's pizzas.  I am beginning to believe, and guess am biased, that the reason a Mack's pizza is so good to so many people, is that it is the cheddar they use, that makes it such a different tasting pizza.

I had a regular customer and his family stop by later Tuesday evening (when I am normally cleaning up).  I was cleaning up and out of boardwalk style pizzas.  He talked awhile about Mack's pizza and said he was at Mack's over this past weekend.  He said he experienced a really droopy crust this time and never had one like that before at Mack's.  He also said he knows Mack's pizza is really thin, but this time it was thinner than normal and it did not taste like a normal Mack's pizza.  That customer does think my boardwalk style pizzas do taste like a Mack's pizza.  I am beginning to believe no matter what kind of dough formulation is used (within reason) most people will think it tastes like a Mack's pizza if the right cheddar is used and the sauce is applied in a spiral pattern (sauce and cheddar have to be something like Mack's).  This is just my opinion from talking to my customers.  After studying that photo, and thinking it over, I might want to make my rim crusts smaller because I think most regular people like the taste of a whole pizza better than the rim crust (this is not including most members here on the forum).  I know what I just posted is not what I like in a pizza.  I do like a pizza with more oven spring and a good flavor in the crust. 

So, that leads me to this question if anyone want to reply.  Is it the experience of the whole pizza, and how it tastes, that made a member purchase a pizza they have liked from before they came to this forum?  I guess what I mean is:  Would a member here on the forum before coming here and learning how to make pizza doughs in different ways and learning about different crust flavors just like the pizza for the way it tasted in whole terms? 

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1845 on: June 01, 2014, 06:53:20 AM »
The Wildwoods Named #1 Boardwalk in the nation by FamilyVacationCritic.com in 2014

http://www.wildwood365.net/2014/05/the-wildwoods-named-1-boardwalk-in.html
 
Norma
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Offline quixoteQ

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1846 on: June 01, 2014, 09:09:10 AM »
On Wildwood 365 facebook page posted on May 21, 2014 they posted a photo of Two pipin' hot slices of pep...err...we mean...Can you TASTE it. https://www.facebook.com/Wildwood365 There were 677 likes as of yesterday.  I thought the comments were interesting.  I still wonder why so many people like Mack's pizzas.  I am beginning to believe, and guess am biased, that the reason a Mack's pizza is so good to so many people, is that it is the cheddar they use, that makes it such a different tasting pizza.

I had a regular customer and his family stop by later Tuesday evening (when I am normally cleaning up).  I was cleaning up and out of boardwalk style pizzas.  He talked awhile about Mack's pizza and said he was at Mack's over this past weekend.  He said he experienced a really droopy crust this time and never had one like that before at Mack's.  He also said he knows Mack's pizza is really thin, but this time it was thinner than normal and it did not taste like a normal Mack's pizza.  That customer does think my boardwalk style pizzas do taste like a Mack's pizza.  I am beginning to believe no matter what kind of dough formulation is used (within reason) most people will think it tastes like a Mack's pizza if the right cheddar is used and the sauce is applied in a spiral pattern (sauce and cheddar have to be something like Mack's).  This is just my opinion from talking to my customers.  After studying that photo, and thinking it over, I might want to make my rim crusts smaller because I think most regular people like the taste of a whole pizza better than the rim crust (this is not including most members here on the forum).  I know what I just posted is not what I like in a pizza.  I do like a pizza with more oven spring and a good flavor in the crust. 

So, that leads me to this question if anyone want to reply.  Is it the experience of the whole pizza, and how it tastes, that made a member purchase a pizza they have liked from before they came to this forum?  I guess what I mean is:  Would a member here on the forum before coming here and learning how to make pizza doughs in different ways and learning about different crust flavors just like the pizza for the way it tasted in whole terms? 

Norma

Norma,

Never underestimate the power of context.  Before people go into a pizzeria, they already have an idea of what good pizza should taste like, how it should look, and some of them probably believe it should be made in a certain way.  It's hard--probably not impossible, but very difficult--to convince somebody that a deeply rooted belief can be changed for the better.

You have spent a long time not just making pies, but thinking about them and working out ideas with them.  The complexity of dough is the calling of pizza lovers here on this site.  But even here, there are certain authenticities that can't be lost without affecting the whole.  The boardwalk style has a very concrete presentation that you don't see anywhere else--perhaps for someone with a childhood memory that presentation trumps the quality of the dough.

I have always loved pizza, and eaten so much that I remember the phone numbers to many places I haven't visited in over twenty years  :-[.  But I had a Neapolitan pie a few years ago that made me think about dough in a way that has me reconsidering the entire pizza, top to bottom.  I'm not even making Neapolitan pies, but I never grew up in a place dominated by high quality pizza and now I'm thinking crust with every pizza I order.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2014, 09:11:36 AM by quixoteQ »
Josh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1847 on: June 01, 2014, 10:24:42 AM »
I think most pizzas are distinguished by their sauce...the sauce is the boss.
You can change the dough or even the cheese around a little but if that sauce flavor changes you're gonna know it immediately.
Just my opinion.

CB
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1848 on: June 01, 2014, 12:08:28 PM »
Norma,

Never underestimate the power of context.  Before people go into a pizzeria, they already have an idea of what good pizza should taste like, how it should look, and some of them probably believe it should be made in a certain way.  It's hard--probably not impossible, but very difficult--to convince somebody that a deeply rooted belief can be changed for the better.

You have spent a long time not just making pies, but thinking about them and working out ideas with them.  The complexity of dough is the calling of pizza lovers here on this site.  But even here, there are certain authenticities that can't be lost without affecting the whole.  The boardwalk style has a very concrete presentation that you don't see anywhere else--perhaps for someone with a childhood memory that presentation trumps the quality of the dough.

I have always loved pizza, and eaten so much that I remember the phone numbers to many places I haven't visited in over twenty years  :-[.  But I had a Neapolitan pie a few years ago that made me think about dough in a way that has me reconsidering the entire pizza, top to bottom.  I'm not even making Neapolitan pies, but I never grew up in a place dominated by high quality pizza and now I'm thinking crust with every pizza I order.

Josh,

I agree with you about the power of context when it comes to a pizzas or other foods. 

The “tomato pie” style like Mack's originated in Trenton, NJ.  There are some pizzerias there that still make pizzas something like Mack's.  Joey's in Hamilton is one of them.  Lol about you recalling phone numbers to many pizzerias you haven't visited in over twenty years. 

Thanks for sharing your story about your experience in trying a Neapolitan pie a few year ago and how that made you think about dough in a different way.  Interesting how that has you reconsidering the entire pizza, top to bottom, and how that made you think about crust with every pizza you order.  What style of crust are you trying to achieve and what kind of characteristics/texture do you want want your crusts to have? 

I am still on the hunt for a crust like I recall Mack's had years ago when they still had deck ovens.  I know Mack's is rooted in my head because that was the best pizza I ever ate from when I was young.

We are lucky to have this forum to learn about all styles of doughs.

Norma 
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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1849 on: June 01, 2014, 12:12:33 PM »
I think most pizzas are distinguished by their sauce...the sauce is the boss.
You can change the dough or even the cheese around a little but if that sauce flavor changes you're gonna know it immediately.
Just my opinion.

CB

Bob,

Interesting that you think that most pizzas are distinguished by the sauce.  Do you think if no cheddar would be used a pizza would still taste like a Mack's pizza?  In my opinion even how the sauce is applied in a spiral pattern on other pizzas does give the pizza a different taste.

Norma
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Offline quixoteQ

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1850 on: June 01, 2014, 12:42:04 PM »
Chi Bob and Norma,

There aren't too many foods I love more than tomato sauce.  When I crack open a can of 7/11s, I portion out the goods into four parts: three for pizza sauce batches and one for spicing and eating straight the rest of the day.  I grew up in the Midwest, and though there weren't too many delicious pie places in my neighborhood, I had lots of friends in the Chicago area, and some in Michigan, too.  What I remember most from those pizzas they shared with me are the variations of spicy, robust tomato sauces that I loved to order in double (I always had to emphasize extra sauce, NOT extra CHEESE!).

There's a famous pie place here in Boston called Pizzeria Regina's. The pies are decent, not great, when ordered correctly, but the crust is nearly flavorless, and if ordered incorrectly its texture takes away from the pleasure of the rest of the pie.  A neighboring joint called the Pushcart gets no respect ( 8) ) but has a great overall pie experience: great sauce, crisp exterior crust with a relatively tender crumb. 

I guess my ideal pizza would resemble the NY slice . . . Large slices stretched thin, crispy enough for my teeth to know the difference between the crust and the rest of the slice, but soft after that initial bite.  It has to have flavor.  I think the Neapolitan pie I had made me realize what that flavor means to the whole.  And the sauce needs to be the major player in terms of cheese and toppings.  Robust, spicy, salty, but tasting mostly like tomatoes.
Josh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1851 on: June 01, 2014, 12:57:31 PM »
Chi Bob and Norma,

There aren't too many foods I love more than tomato sauce.  When I crack open a can of 7/11s, I portion out the goods into four parts: three for pizza sauce batches and one for spicing and eating straight the rest of the day.  I grew up in the Midwest, and though there weren't too many delicious pie places in my neighborhood, I had lots of friends in the Chicago area, and some in Michigan, too.  What I remember most from those pizzas they shared with me are the variations of spicy, robust tomato sauces that I loved to order in double (I always had to emphasize extra sauce, NOT extra CHEESE!).

There's a famous pie place here in Boston called Pizzeria Regina's. The pies are decent, not great, when ordered correctly, but the crust is nearly flavorless, and if ordered incorrectly its texture takes away from the pleasure of the rest of the pie.  A neighboring joint called the Pushcart gets no respect ( 8) ) but has a great overall pie experience: great sauce, crisp exterior crust with a relatively tender crumb. 

I guess my ideal pizza would resemble the NY slice . . . Large slices stretched thin, crispy enough for my teeth to know the difference between the crust and the rest of the slice, but soft after that initial bite.  It has to have flavor.  I think the Neapolitan pie I had made me realize what that flavor means to the whole.  And the sauce needs to be the major player in terms of cheese and toppings.  Robust, spicy, salty, but tasting mostly like tomatoes.

Josh,

Thanks for sharing with us there aren't many foods you love more than tomato sauce.  Interesting that your friends shared with you the variations of spicy, robust tomato sauces, and that was how you found out about them.  As I am sure you have seen here on the fourm tomato sauces for pizzas can be a highly personal subject.

It sounds like you are a lot like me, in that you analyze ever pizza you taste from great sauce, crust texture, etc.  :-D

I enjoyed hearing what your ideal pizza would be like.  Do you think you are near making your ideal pizza? 

I think I am getting nearer making a Mack's pizza, but don't know if I ever will be able to do it at market. 

Norma
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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1852 on: June 01, 2014, 01:15:48 PM »
Norma,

Last week I made a pair of pies that my wife titled, "your best pies ever."  I told her I didn't like them, and she told me I was not to talk about pizza with her for one week.   ;D. Honestly I think she's just happy I'm cooking more often and could care less what kind of crap I pull out of the oven.  No, right now I'm just experimenting with recipes I find and controlled variations that I dream up while procrastinating at work with the dough calculator.  I like the idea of longer ferments, so that's my current project: using Craig's yeast predictor and extending ferment time.

I've read through so many posts of yours, Norma, that it got me thinking: do you make pies for yourself differently than you do for your customers? 

And by the way, I'm an overthinker through and through.  Doing is just a byproduct of my overthinking.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2014, 01:19:03 PM by quixoteQ »
Josh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1853 on: June 01, 2014, 09:19:17 PM »
Norma,

Last week I made a pair of pies that my wife titled, "your best pies ever."  I told her I didn't like them, and she told me I was not to talk about pizza with her for one week.   ;D. Honestly I think she's just happy I'm cooking more often and could care less what kind of crap I pull out of the oven.  No, right now I'm just experimenting with recipes I find and controlled variations that I dream up while procrastinating at work with the dough calculator.  I like the idea of longer ferments, so that's my current project: using Craig's yeast predictor and extending ferment time.

I've read through so many posts of yours, Norma, that it got me thinking: do you make pies for yourself differently than you do for your customers? 

And by the way, I'm an overthinker through and through.  Doing is just a byproduct of my overthinking.

Josh,

I am glad your wife titled your pizzas you made last week, “your best pizzas ever.”  I had to chuckle when you told her you didn't like them.  You may be right that your wife is just happy that you are cooking more often, but then everyone has their own tastes when it come to what kind of pizza each individual likes.  Lol, about you experimenting with recipes you find and controlled variations that you dream up while procrastinating at work with the dough calculator.  I find what you posted very interesting and amusing.

To answer your question, I have tried many styles of pizzas and many formulations that I just wanted to try to see what would happen (that includes many mixing methods, flours, sauces, cheeses etc, etc).  I don't think I would be able to count all of the different dough formulations I have tried for the many styles of pizzas experimented with.  I stumbled upon some good ones, and found many here on the forum that other members posted.  I have also been on many reverse engineering, or cloning threads with Peter and other members.  I learned a lot on those threads.  Some of those reverse engineering projects I did try out on my customers to see if they would like those pizzas.  What I really want is a good pizza like Mack's from many years ago for my customers in the end.  I also started another thread that eventually led me to making the Detroit style pizzas for market.  I have also tasted Craig's wonderful Neapolitan pizzas at his home so I am still trying to make some pies like his too. 

I think the “pizza bug” has caught you big time.  8) I think it is still spreading here on the forum.

Being an over-thinker isn't a bad thing.  It can lead to some delicious tasting pizzas. 

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1854 on: June 05, 2014, 09:24:14 AM »
I think I am getting closer to what a Mack's pizza looks like from the photo I posted at Reply 1844 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg316924#msg316924 (of two slices of a pepperoni Mack's pizza).  The photo of my Mack's attempted pepperoni pizza on Tuesday I think looks okay except for the rim crust.  I did edit out my rim crust.  Now to still work on my rim crust for a Mack's pizza.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1855 on: June 07, 2014, 10:12:26 AM »
These are some videos (some posted before on this thread), of how Mack's dough looks, what the dough balls look like, how the dough balls are pressed on before opening, and the videos show a few more things.

A video of the pieman tossing the dough  with two skins at Mack & Manco.



And a video inside Manco & Manco showing a pie being tossed in the video.

 

And another videos of tossing the dough at Mack's pizza.







 

 


The things I am curious about is how dry those dough balls look there when the piemen are pressing them out.  There are also finger indentations when pressing on the dough balls.  There also doesn't look like there are any fermentation bubbles in the skins.  If the dough balls are looked at about 2:16 into the third video at Mack's the dough balls look rather flat.   Also at about 3:51 in that same video the dough balls can be seen.

Another video of Jesse opening the dough at Mack's and making the pizza blindfolded.  :o

 

The dough balls also can be seen and how flat they look.  I am curious about why they look so flat.  Maybe not a lot of yeast is used, or either it might be the hydration that is used.  It also can be seen in the above video that Jesse uses a container something like the one I have and the Marcua's uses to use apply their sauce.  I also saw that same container being used at Mack's pizza the one time I was there when Mack's was not really busy. 

This video show Joey Mack's pizza in Philly.  It says in the description that Joe Mack worked at Mack's pizza in the 60's to 70's.  I know Joey Mack's pizza does not taste like Mack's because I was there.

 

and



To see how thin Mack's pizza slices are this video shows somewhat how thin they are. 

 

I am wonder if anyone has any idea of what the hydration of a Mack's dough might be and what can be learned from those videos.  I am also curious about what the weight of one of Mack's dough balls are for their 18” pizza.

I also reviewed the videos I posted of Mack's in this thread.

Steve (Ev) posted at Reply 677 and the next reply at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg145431#msg145431 what Mack's dough balls looked like, and what the beginning pressing looks like, with those indentations on the dough balls.  It looks to me like those partly opened skins can be stacked upon one another. 

Norma
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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1856 on: June 07, 2014, 02:56:38 PM »
Norma,

Going strictly from memory, I thought that that the Mack's dough balls weighed around 18-20 ounces or thereabouts.  In part, that came from actual Mack's pizzas that you and other members purchased and weighed and where important dimensions and other factors were noted, like diameter and estimated amounts of cheese and sauce. But seeing the videos again, it is clear that the pizzas that Mack's made could have varied quite a bit weight-wise from one pizza to another because of the free throwing of the cheese and the casual way that the sauce was applied by different workers, including using different sauce depositing methods and different related dispensing devices. It is now conceivable to me that the dough balls could have weighed about a pound. So long as the amount of yeast was on the fairly low side, and so long as the combined hydration and fat (oil or lard) values were on the fairly low side, and so long as the dough was given a fairly long knead in a commercial mixer, as scott r once surmised, then it should have been fairly easy to open up the dough balls and spin and toss the skins out to 18" with relative impunity. I also noted Steve's (Ev's) description of the Mack's crust as follows: The crust had a nice flavor but was very bread-like in texture without any open crumb structure. That description would fit a dough that is mixed to almost full gluten development. We can only guess as to the duration of the fermentation window. Originally some of us speculated that it was a few days, although we also could see that that would have been atypical and maybe impractical for a high volume boardwalk operation such as Mack's. After all, they were not trying to make artisan pizzas. Their mantra most likely would have been the KISS (keep it simple, stupid) method.

As for the skins themselves, they can look either flat or puffy but yet be made from the same weight of dough. More specifically, a flat skin could reflect a low amount of yeast, a low effective hydration value (actual hydration plus fat combined), a cold condition of the dough ball, a somewhat underfermented dough, or it could be made flat simply by punching it down, either in preparation of making a skin or to keep the dough from getting too gassy. By contrast, and as was shown in one of the videos, a skin could be light and puffy, most likely because it was allowed to sit at room temperature for too long. If the skin is puffy, that can mislead people as to the weight of the dough ball simply because the dough ball looks larger.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1857 on: June 07, 2014, 04:43:05 PM »
Norma,

Going strictly from memory, I thought that that the Mack's dough balls weighed around 18-20 ounces or thereabouts.  In part, that came from actual Mack's pizzas that you and other members purchased and weighed and where important dimensions and other factors were noted, like diameter and estimated amounts of cheese and sauce. But seeing the videos again, it is clear that the pizzas that Mack's made could have varied quite a bit weight-wise from one pizza to another because of the free throwing of the cheese and the casual way that the sauce was applied by different workers, including using different sauce depositing methods and different related dispensing devices. It is now conceivable to me that the dough balls could have weighed about a pound. So long as the amount of yeast was on the fairly low side, and so long as the combined hydration and fat (oil or lard) values were on the fairly low side, and so long as the dough was given a fairly long knead in a commercial mixer, as scott r once surmised, then it should have been fairly easy to open up the dough balls and spin and toss the skins out to 18" with relative impunity. I also noted Steve's (Ev's) description of the Mack's crust as follows: The crust had a nice flavor but was very bread-like in texture without any open crumb structure. That description would fit a dough that is mixed to almost full gluten development. We can only guess as to the duration of the fermentation window. Originally some of us speculated that it was a few days, although we also could see that that would have been atypical and maybe impractical for a high volume boardwalk operation such as Mack's. After all, they were not trying to make artisan pizzas. Their mantra most likely would have been the KISS (keep it simple, stupid) method.

As for the skins themselves, they can look either flat or puffy but yet be made from the same weight of dough. More specifically, a flat skin could reflect a low amount of yeast, a low effective hydration value (actual hydration plus fat combined), a cold condition of the dough ball, a somewhat underfermented dough, or it could be made flat simply by punching it down, either in preparation of making a skin or to keep the dough from getting too gassy. By contrast, and as was shown in one of the videos, a skin could be light and puffy, most likely because it was allowed to sit at room temperature for too long. If the skin is puffy, that can mislead people as to the weight of the dough ball simply because the dough ball looks larger.

Peter

Peter,

I know the weight of Mack's pizzas could vary from one pizza to another because of the free throwing of the cheese and the way the sauce is applied by different workers.  Interesting that it is now conceivable to you that the dough balls could weigh about a pound.

I recall that scott r posted he thought the dough at Mack's had a fairly long knead time.  Steve's post about the crust is about what I think about Mack's crust in the last few times I had a Mack's pizza.

My attempts at weighing a Mack's pizza were off if you recall.  I posted about both of the attempts.  One was Reply 215 (and the next few posts) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg97859#msg97859  and at Reply 1439 (and thereafter), when I also got a par-baked pizza at Mack's the second time.  I forgot about PiedPiper weighing slices at Reply 652 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg140825#msg140825 and you wrote a detailed post at 654 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg140870#msg140870 and figured out the comparisons.  I think your TF you tried at Reply 204 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg97757#msg97757 looked more in line with what a Mack's crust might be.

When I get to go to Mack's again I will have to look at their dough balls.  I wish I could snag one but know that isn't possible.  Maybe I will ask what their dough balls weigh.

Thanks for your help!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1858 on: June 07, 2014, 05:58:58 PM »
Norma,

As best I recall, the smallest thickness factor I used was 0.072. For an 18" pizza, that translated into a dough ball weight of a bit over 18.3 ounces. I was blaming the overweight of the clones on the cheese and sauce and my home oven bake protocol when maybe it was that the dough ball weights were too high. But I think it is also important to keep in mind that no law existed that said that all of the Mack's dough balls had to weigh exactly some magic number. They were perhaps as casual about scaling their dough balls as they were in dressing pizzas with the cheese and sauce.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1859 on: June 07, 2014, 07:09:12 PM »
Norma,

As best I recall, the smallest thickness factor I used was 0.072. For an 18" pizza, that translated into a dough ball weight of a bit over 18.3 ounces. I was blaming the overweight of the clones on the cheese and sauce and my home oven bake protocol when maybe it was that the dough ball weights were too high. But I think it is also important to keep in mind that no law existed that said that all of the Mack's dough balls had to weigh exactly some magic number. They were perhaps as casual about scaling their dough balls as they were in dressing pizzas with the cheese and sauce.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for telling me the lowest TF you recalled using, and what that translated to in dough ball weight.  When I posted a photo of a slice of a Manco & Manco pizza slice at Reply 1171 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg200281#msg200281 I think that shows how thin their slices are.  You told me at Reply 1175 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg200491#msg200491 that I might try lowering the TF to see if that would get me to closer to the results I would want.  The lowest dough ball weight I recall using was at Reply 1213 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg202247#msg202247 and that was a mistake in the first place.  Looking at that pizza now it doesn't look too bad to my eyes.

If we every get the Mack's clone figured out right I think I will take your advice at Reply 1450 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg212839#msg212839 and keep the whole thing a secret.  Most people come here to the forum to just look for recipes that are cut-and-dried.  I might post on different threads to make anyone that is interested dig a little deeper if they are really interested in all that was tried.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


 

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