Author Topic: NJ Boardwalk Pizza  (Read 236149 times)

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Offline quixoteQ

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1850 on: June 01, 2014, 12:42:04 PM »
Chi Bob and Norma,

There aren't too many foods I love more than tomato sauce.  When I crack open a can of 7/11s, I portion out the goods into four parts: three for pizza sauce batches and one for spicing and eating straight the rest of the day.  I grew up in the Midwest, and though there weren't too many delicious pie places in my neighborhood, I had lots of friends in the Chicago area, and some in Michigan, too.  What I remember most from those pizzas they shared with me are the variations of spicy, robust tomato sauces that I loved to order in double (I always had to emphasize extra sauce, NOT extra CHEESE!).

There's a famous pie place here in Boston called Pizzeria Regina's. The pies are decent, not great, when ordered correctly, but the crust is nearly flavorless, and if ordered incorrectly its texture takes away from the pleasure of the rest of the pie.  A neighboring joint called the Pushcart gets no respect ( 8) ) but has a great overall pie experience: great sauce, crisp exterior crust with a relatively tender crumb. 

I guess my ideal pizza would resemble the NY slice . . . Large slices stretched thin, crispy enough for my teeth to know the difference between the crust and the rest of the slice, but soft after that initial bite.  It has to have flavor.  I think the Neapolitan pie I had made me realize what that flavor means to the whole.  And the sauce needs to be the major player in terms of cheese and toppings.  Robust, spicy, salty, but tasting mostly like tomatoes.
Josh


Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1851 on: June 01, 2014, 12:57:31 PM »
Chi Bob and Norma,

There aren't too many foods I love more than tomato sauce.  When I crack open a can of 7/11s, I portion out the goods into four parts: three for pizza sauce batches and one for spicing and eating straight the rest of the day.  I grew up in the Midwest, and though there weren't too many delicious pie places in my neighborhood, I had lots of friends in the Chicago area, and some in Michigan, too.  What I remember most from those pizzas they shared with me are the variations of spicy, robust tomato sauces that I loved to order in double (I always had to emphasize extra sauce, NOT extra CHEESE!).

There's a famous pie place here in Boston called Pizzeria Regina's. The pies are decent, not great, when ordered correctly, but the crust is nearly flavorless, and if ordered incorrectly its texture takes away from the pleasure of the rest of the pie.  A neighboring joint called the Pushcart gets no respect ( 8) ) but has a great overall pie experience: great sauce, crisp exterior crust with a relatively tender crumb. 

I guess my ideal pizza would resemble the NY slice . . . Large slices stretched thin, crispy enough for my teeth to know the difference between the crust and the rest of the slice, but soft after that initial bite.  It has to have flavor.  I think the Neapolitan pie I had made me realize what that flavor means to the whole.  And the sauce needs to be the major player in terms of cheese and toppings.  Robust, spicy, salty, but tasting mostly like tomatoes.

Josh,

Thanks for sharing with us there aren't many foods you love more than tomato sauce.  Interesting that your friends shared with you the variations of spicy, robust tomato sauces, and that was how you found out about them.  As I am sure you have seen here on the fourm tomato sauces for pizzas can be a highly personal subject.

It sounds like you are a lot like me, in that you analyze ever pizza you taste from great sauce, crust texture, etc.  :-D

I enjoyed hearing what your ideal pizza would be like.  Do you think you are near making your ideal pizza? 

I think I am getting nearer making a Mack's pizza, but don't know if I ever will be able to do it at market. 

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1852 on: June 01, 2014, 01:15:48 PM »
Norma,

Last week I made a pair of pies that my wife titled, "your best pies ever."  I told her I didn't like them, and she told me I was not to talk about pizza with her for one week.   ;D. Honestly I think she's just happy I'm cooking more often and could care less what kind of crap I pull out of the oven.  No, right now I'm just experimenting with recipes I find and controlled variations that I dream up while procrastinating at work with the dough calculator.  I like the idea of longer ferments, so that's my current project: using Craig's yeast predictor and extending ferment time.

I've read through so many posts of yours, Norma, that it got me thinking: do you make pies for yourself differently than you do for your customers? 

And by the way, I'm an overthinker through and through.  Doing is just a byproduct of my overthinking.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2014, 01:19:03 PM by quixoteQ »
Josh

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1853 on: June 01, 2014, 09:19:17 PM »
Norma,

Last week I made a pair of pies that my wife titled, "your best pies ever."  I told her I didn't like them, and she told me I was not to talk about pizza with her for one week.   ;D. Honestly I think she's just happy I'm cooking more often and could care less what kind of crap I pull out of the oven.  No, right now I'm just experimenting with recipes I find and controlled variations that I dream up while procrastinating at work with the dough calculator.  I like the idea of longer ferments, so that's my current project: using Craig's yeast predictor and extending ferment time.

I've read through so many posts of yours, Norma, that it got me thinking: do you make pies for yourself differently than you do for your customers? 

And by the way, I'm an overthinker through and through.  Doing is just a byproduct of my overthinking.

Josh,

I am glad your wife titled your pizzas you made last week, “your best pizzas ever.”  I had to chuckle when you told her you didn't like them.  You may be right that your wife is just happy that you are cooking more often, but then everyone has their own tastes when it come to what kind of pizza each individual likes.  Lol, about you experimenting with recipes you find and controlled variations that you dream up while procrastinating at work with the dough calculator.  I find what you posted very interesting and amusing.

To answer your question, I have tried many styles of pizzas and many formulations that I just wanted to try to see what would happen (that includes many mixing methods, flours, sauces, cheeses etc, etc).  I don't think I would be able to count all of the different dough formulations I have tried for the many styles of pizzas experimented with.  I stumbled upon some good ones, and found many here on the forum that other members posted.  I have also been on many reverse engineering, or cloning threads with Peter and other members.  I learned a lot on those threads.  Some of those reverse engineering projects I did try out on my customers to see if they would like those pizzas.  What I really want is a good pizza like Mack's from many years ago for my customers in the end.  I also started another thread that eventually led me to making the Detroit style pizzas for market.  I have also tasted Craig's wonderful Neapolitan pizzas at his home so I am still trying to make some pies like his too. 

I think the “pizza bug” has caught you big time.  8) I think it is still spreading here on the forum.

Being an over-thinker isn't a bad thing.  It can lead to some delicious tasting pizzas. 

Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1854 on: June 05, 2014, 09:24:14 AM »
I think I am getting closer to what a Mack's pizza looks like from the photo I posted at Reply 1844 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg316924#msg316924 (of two slices of a pepperoni Mack's pizza).  The photo of my Mack's attempted pepperoni pizza on Tuesday I think looks okay except for the rim crust.  I did edit out my rim crust.  Now to still work on my rim crust for a Mack's pizza.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1855 on: June 07, 2014, 10:12:26 AM »
These are some videos (some posted before on this thread), of how Mack's dough looks, what the dough balls look like, how the dough balls are pressed on before opening, and the videos show a few more things.

A video of the pieman tossing the dough  with two skins at Mack & Manco.



And a video inside Manco & Manco showing a pie being tossed in the video.

 

And another videos of tossing the dough at Mack's pizza.







 

 


The things I am curious about is how dry those dough balls look there when the piemen are pressing them out.  There are also finger indentations when pressing on the dough balls.  There also doesn't look like there are any fermentation bubbles in the skins.  If the dough balls are looked at about 2:16 into the third video at Mack's the dough balls look rather flat.   Also at about 3:51 in that same video the dough balls can be seen.

Another video of Jesse opening the dough at Mack's and making the pizza blindfolded.  :o

 

The dough balls also can be seen and how flat they look.  I am curious about why they look so flat.  Maybe not a lot of yeast is used, or either it might be the hydration that is used.  It also can be seen in the above video that Jesse uses a container something like the one I have and the Marcua's uses to use apply their sauce.  I also saw that same container being used at Mack's pizza the one time I was there when Mack's was not really busy. 

This video show Joey Mack's pizza in Philly.  It says in the description that Joe Mack worked at Mack's pizza in the 60's to 70's.  I know Joey Mack's pizza does not taste like Mack's because I was there.

 

and



To see how thin Mack's pizza slices are this video shows somewhat how thin they are. 

 

I am wonder if anyone has any idea of what the hydration of a Mack's dough might be and what can be learned from those videos.  I am also curious about what the weight of one of Mack's dough balls are for their 18” pizza.

I also reviewed the videos I posted of Mack's in this thread.

Steve (Ev) posted at Reply 677 and the next reply at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg145431#msg145431 what Mack's dough balls looked like, and what the beginning pressing looks like, with those indentations on the dough balls.  It looks to me like those partly opened skins can be stacked upon one another. 

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1856 on: June 07, 2014, 02:56:38 PM »
Norma,

Going strictly from memory, I thought that that the Mack's dough balls weighed around 18-20 ounces or thereabouts.  In part, that came from actual Mack's pizzas that you and other members purchased and weighed and where important dimensions and other factors were noted, like diameter and estimated amounts of cheese and sauce. But seeing the videos again, it is clear that the pizzas that Mack's made could have varied quite a bit weight-wise from one pizza to another because of the free throwing of the cheese and the casual way that the sauce was applied by different workers, including using different sauce depositing methods and different related dispensing devices. It is now conceivable to me that the dough balls could have weighed about a pound. So long as the amount of yeast was on the fairly low side, and so long as the combined hydration and fat (oil or lard) values were on the fairly low side, and so long as the dough was given a fairly long knead in a commercial mixer, as scott r once surmised, then it should have been fairly easy to open up the dough balls and spin and toss the skins out to 18" with relative impunity. I also noted Steve's (Ev's) description of the Mack's crust as follows: The crust had a nice flavor but was very bread-like in texture without any open crumb structure. That description would fit a dough that is mixed to almost full gluten development. We can only guess as to the duration of the fermentation window. Originally some of us speculated that it was a few days, although we also could see that that would have been atypical and maybe impractical for a high volume boardwalk operation such as Mack's. After all, they were not trying to make artisan pizzas. Their mantra most likely would have been the KISS (keep it simple, stupid) method.

As for the skins themselves, they can look either flat or puffy but yet be made from the same weight of dough. More specifically, a flat skin could reflect a low amount of yeast, a low effective hydration value (actual hydration plus fat combined), a cold condition of the dough ball, a somewhat underfermented dough, or it could be made flat simply by punching it down, either in preparation of making a skin or to keep the dough from getting too gassy. By contrast, and as was shown in one of the videos, a skin could be light and puffy, most likely because it was allowed to sit at room temperature for too long. If the skin is puffy, that can mislead people as to the weight of the dough ball simply because the dough ball looks larger.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1857 on: June 07, 2014, 04:43:05 PM »
Norma,

Going strictly from memory, I thought that that the Mack's dough balls weighed around 18-20 ounces or thereabouts.  In part, that came from actual Mack's pizzas that you and other members purchased and weighed and where important dimensions and other factors were noted, like diameter and estimated amounts of cheese and sauce. But seeing the videos again, it is clear that the pizzas that Mack's made could have varied quite a bit weight-wise from one pizza to another because of the free throwing of the cheese and the casual way that the sauce was applied by different workers, including using different sauce depositing methods and different related dispensing devices. It is now conceivable to me that the dough balls could have weighed about a pound. So long as the amount of yeast was on the fairly low side, and so long as the combined hydration and fat (oil or lard) values were on the fairly low side, and so long as the dough was given a fairly long knead in a commercial mixer, as scott r once surmised, then it should have been fairly easy to open up the dough balls and spin and toss the skins out to 18" with relative impunity. I also noted Steve's (Ev's) description of the Mack's crust as follows: The crust had a nice flavor but was very bread-like in texture without any open crumb structure. That description would fit a dough that is mixed to almost full gluten development. We can only guess as to the duration of the fermentation window. Originally some of us speculated that it was a few days, although we also could see that that would have been atypical and maybe impractical for a high volume boardwalk operation such as Mack's. After all, they were not trying to make artisan pizzas. Their mantra most likely would have been the KISS (keep it simple, stupid) method.

As for the skins themselves, they can look either flat or puffy but yet be made from the same weight of dough. More specifically, a flat skin could reflect a low amount of yeast, a low effective hydration value (actual hydration plus fat combined), a cold condition of the dough ball, a somewhat underfermented dough, or it could be made flat simply by punching it down, either in preparation of making a skin or to keep the dough from getting too gassy. By contrast, and as was shown in one of the videos, a skin could be light and puffy, most likely because it was allowed to sit at room temperature for too long. If the skin is puffy, that can mislead people as to the weight of the dough ball simply because the dough ball looks larger.

Peter

Peter,

I know the weight of Mack's pizzas could vary from one pizza to another because of the free throwing of the cheese and the way the sauce is applied by different workers.  Interesting that it is now conceivable to you that the dough balls could weigh about a pound.

I recall that scott r posted he thought the dough at Mack's had a fairly long knead time.  Steve's post about the crust is about what I think about Mack's crust in the last few times I had a Mack's pizza.

My attempts at weighing a Mack's pizza were off if you recall.  I posted about both of the attempts.  One was Reply 215 (and the next few posts) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg97859#msg97859  and at Reply 1439 (and thereafter), when I also got a par-baked pizza at Mack's the second time.  I forgot about PiedPiper weighing slices at Reply 652 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg140825#msg140825 and you wrote a detailed post at 654 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg140870#msg140870 and figured out the comparisons.  I think your TF you tried at Reply 204 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg97757#msg97757 looked more in line with what a Mack's crust might be.

When I get to go to Mack's again I will have to look at their dough balls.  I wish I could snag one but know that isn't possible.  Maybe I will ask what their dough balls weigh.

Thanks for your help!

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1858 on: June 07, 2014, 05:58:58 PM »
Norma,

As best I recall, the smallest thickness factor I used was 0.072. For an 18" pizza, that translated into a dough ball weight of a bit over 18.3 ounces. I was blaming the overweight of the clones on the cheese and sauce and my home oven bake protocol when maybe it was that the dough ball weights were too high. But I think it is also important to keep in mind that no law existed that said that all of the Mack's dough balls had to weigh exactly some magic number. They were perhaps as casual about scaling their dough balls as they were in dressing pizzas with the cheese and sauce.

Peter


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1859 on: June 07, 2014, 07:09:12 PM »
Norma,

As best I recall, the smallest thickness factor I used was 0.072. For an 18" pizza, that translated into a dough ball weight of a bit over 18.3 ounces. I was blaming the overweight of the clones on the cheese and sauce and my home oven bake protocol when maybe it was that the dough ball weights were too high. But I think it is also important to keep in mind that no law existed that said that all of the Mack's dough balls had to weigh exactly some magic number. They were perhaps as casual about scaling their dough balls as they were in dressing pizzas with the cheese and sauce.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for telling me the lowest TF you recalled using, and what that translated to in dough ball weight.  When I posted a photo of a slice of a Manco & Manco pizza slice at Reply 1171 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg200281#msg200281 I think that shows how thin their slices are.  You told me at Reply 1175 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg200491#msg200491 that I might try lowering the TF to see if that would get me to closer to the results I would want.  The lowest dough ball weight I recall using was at Reply 1213 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg202247#msg202247 and that was a mistake in the first place.  Looking at that pizza now it doesn't look too bad to my eyes.

If we every get the Mack's clone figured out right I think I will take your advice at Reply 1450 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9068.msg212839#msg212839 and keep the whole thing a secret.  Most people come here to the forum to just look for recipes that are cut-and-dried.  I might post on different threads to make anyone that is interested dig a little deeper if they are really interested in all that was tried.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1860 on: June 07, 2014, 07:26:50 PM »
Norma,

The dough ball weight that you referenced in Reply 1213 was 20 ounces (1 1/4 lb. x 16 = 20). The corresponding thickness factor would have been 0.0786. For a one-pound dough ball used to make an 18" pizza, the nominal thickness factor would be 16/(3.14159 x 9 x 9) = 0.062876. Looking at the thickness of the crust as shown in the photo of Reply 1171 that you referenced, I think that the above thickness factor (0.062876) is credible and in the ballpark. Of course, there is no guarantee that that value will work as well in your deck oven at work.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1861 on: June 07, 2014, 08:08:36 PM »
Norma,

The dough ball weight that you referenced in Reply 1213 was 20 ounces (1 1/4 lb. x 16 = 20). The corresponding thickness factor would have been 0.0786. For a one-pound dough ball used to make an 18" pizza, the nominal thickness factor would be 16/(3.14159 x 9 x 9) = 0.062876. Looking at the thickness of the crust as shown in the photo of Reply 1171 that you referenced, I think that the above thickness factor (0.062876) is credible and in the ballpark. Of course, there is no guarantee that that value will work as well in your deck oven at work.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for figuring out what TF I had used in Reply 1213, and for posting that for a one-pound dough ball to make an 18” pizza, the nominal TF would be 0.062876.  I think I recently tried some pizzas on another thread with the TF of 0.062876.  I do know that my oven might not bake like Mack's oven. 

I think Mack's might be going downhill in the past few years from what I have tasted of their pizzas and what some bloggers have posted.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1862 on: July 12, 2014, 09:03:27 AM »
After watching these videos again it reminded me of De Lorenzo's dough opening techniques in how Tony/other piemen presses/pounds on the dough ball a lot and the proceeds to open by sliding the skin around.  The similarity stops though in that Mack's dough balls can be tossed and twirled well.
 

 
And this video.
 

 
Mack's dough balls can also be opened a little bit differently than sliding the dough about as show in this video.
 


I wonder if it was a “Trenton thing” in how similarly the dough balls are opened by pounding/pressing on them and then sliding the dough skin around.  I don't think it has been posted on the forum before if it is a “Trenton thing” or not.

If anyone is interested I posted more about pies like a Mack's pizza on the Tomato Pie thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=25401.0 and the Flavour of Dough thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30641.0

I am still working a pizza like Mack's.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1863 on: July 19, 2014, 02:25:03 PM »

And this video.
 

 
Norma


Norma,
I think I've been reading this site for about 2.5 years.  Only about 1 registered.  I almost can't believe I've never once looked at this topic.  Even by accident when clicking on other hyperlinks, etc,.  But I figure what took more than 10 years to create - reasonably could not be easily read in only 25% of that time!


Thank you very much for posting these videos.  I've never seen dough that thin and strong flying around like that!  In video two - that crazy & ingenious PVC and vacuum tube tomato sauce delivery hose - is also a first for me to see.  I wonder what "feeds" that tube?  Probably a 55 gallon drum  :-D   Great to see how the pro's (like you) do it!  The more I read thru this topic - the more interesting it becomes.   Many thanks, - Don
« Last Edit: July 19, 2014, 03:23:01 PM by Donjo911 »
I have done wrong.. but what I did, I thought needed to be done.

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1864 on: July 19, 2014, 04:05:07 PM »

Norma,
I think I've been reading this site for about 2.5 years.  Only about 1 registered.  I almost can't believe I've never once looked at this topic.  Even by accident when clicking on other hyperlinks, etc,.  But I figure what took more than 10 years to create - reasonably could not be easily read in only 25% of that time!


Thank you very much for posting these videos.  I've never seen dough that thin and strong flying around like that!  In video two - that crazy & ingenious PVC and vacuum tube tomato sauce delivery hose - is also a first for me to see.  I wonder what "feeds" that tube?  Probably a 55 gallon drum  :-D   Great to see how the pro's (like you) do it!  The more I read thru this topic - the more interesting it becomes.   Many thanks, - Don

Don,

Really this thread is only about 5 years year.  I guess things that were learned in this thread should be updated to take out all the information that is not correct, but if a member really want to know about something from this thread all they have to do is ask.  I am a firm believer in not just handling things over too easily, and making someone work for their supper if they would really want to make a pizza like Mack's or Manco & Manco.  Too many people just come here to the forum to just grab a recipe and then leave. 

From what I have heard lately, I really don't know how that tube works, but think there is sauce stored right under where they shoot the sauce from the hose. 

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1865 on: August 06, 2014, 09:14:44 AM »
I saw this commercial for Seaside Heights back in the 80's.  I still love to watch how the pieman can toss and twirled the skins.  The piemen at Maruca's Pizza are very good at tossing the skins.    

Always front and center at the counter at our Dupont Ave. location was our father Anthony "Jake" Maruca posted by Maruca's on facebook.  Part about Maruca's starts about 2:25 into the video.



Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1866 on: August 12, 2014, 04:14:43 AM »
I saw this commercial for Seaside Heights back in the 80's.  I still love to watch how the pieman can toss and twirled the skins.  The piemen at Maruca's Pizza are very good at tossing the skins.   

Always front and center at the counter at our Dupont Ave. location was our father Anthony "Jake" Maruca posted by Maruca's on facebook.  Part about Maruca's starts about 2:25 into the video.



Norma

Wow!  What a harsh reminder of the fashion low point that was the 80's :)

I went to Seaside a bit in the early 90's.  I'm sure I've eaten Maruca's.    I wasn't the pizza snob I am now, so my memories don't hold much weight.  I have fond memories of the 27" pie at the sawmill.  A giant slice and a soda for $1.25 (drank a bit of beer there too).


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1868 on: August 13, 2014, 09:13:15 AM »
Since Mack's pizza has been voted the #1 pizza in Wildwood, I thought I would post the history of Mack's pizza for anyone that does not know about how Mack's pizza came to be. 

To really understand you have to go back to the beginning. Before it was even called pizza. Back to Trenton, where Anthony Macrone, the Godfather of the family, began selling Trenton Tomato Pies at his restaurant near the Trenton State Fairgrounds in the early 1950s. 

Even though they may look the same to the observer, a Trenton Tomato Pie is different than a pizza in that it is made with a thin and crispy dough crust with the cheeze layered first and the tomato sauce added on top, and after baking at high temperature for ten to twelve minutes, is best eaten fresh and hot. 

The first Trenton Tomato Pie has been traced back to 1910 when they were first served at Joe's in the Italian neighborhood of Chambersburg, and made popular by Papas and DeLorenzos and other places run by Italians from the Naples area of Italy. 

Although a staple in Trenton, the Tomato Pie didn't make its debute at the Jersey Shore until the early 1950s when a store opened in Seaside, and a new market for the product opened up. 

Then one day in 1952 Mr. Anthony Macrone and his son Dominick aka "Duke," took a drive down Route 9, visited Wildwood and decided that the boardwalk at that seasonal resort might be a good place to open a restaurant featuring their Tomato Pies. It rained the first Memorial Day weekend the first Mack's opened and they only sold eight pies. 

Although they did include some other items on the menu, a local judge who was a steady customer recommended they cut back on everything but the Tomato Pie, and it really took off. Although others tried to duplicate their product and business, and dozens of other pizza parlors have opened on the boardwalk, Mack's had loyal customers who kept coming back and they expanded, eventually having four shops on the Wildwood boardwalk. 


History came from http://oceancitydays.blogspot.com/2011/12/mack-mancos-to-manco-mancos-pizza.html 

I think Mack's or Manco & Manco pizzas reached much farther than is though.  I recalled reading this part of an article. 

“About ten years ago I was on the beach in Aruba with just my family and me. I happened to be wearing a Mack & Manco t-shirt. I’m just sitting in my chair reading and a guy walks by and turns to me and says: ‘Hey, do you have any cuts of pizza? I’m from South Jersey and I love your stuff.’ It reaches far and wide. It’s magical and we’re going to continue to match it, just like Disney. We owe it to the founders of these brands. We’re not going to let the bigness of corporate America ruin our brand. I will not let that happen. We’re going to keep in it in the family.”

http://www.jerseymanmagazine.com/manco-and-manco-pizza   

I think I have mentioned in another thread that I have a man and his sons that now come each week to purchase my version of Mack's pizza.  The man told me that he grew up with the Mack's brothers and played with them.  The man that is my customer lived on the same street as where Mack's lived.  I have not asked the man a lot about what he recalls about the Mack's brothers, or where he specially lived, because I am usually busy when he comes to my stand.  He did tell me that Mack's had apartments over their pizza business and he ate pizzas at Mack's a lot.  Mack's is his favorite pizza.  Since he has found my version of Mack's pizza he is now purchasing 2 whole pies each week.  He is happy that I offer a pizza that is almost like Mack's pizza.

Norma

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1869 on: August 13, 2014, 09:45:40 AM »
Thanks Norma,  that was very interesting.   I hope I can try one of your Mack's style pizzas one of these days.

Offline norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1870 on: August 13, 2014, 10:03:47 AM »

I hope I can try one of your Mack's style pizzas one of these days.


TinRoof,

I hope you get to my pizza stand someday.  My version of a Mack's pizza has a different crust and is a little bit less greasy.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1871 on: August 17, 2014, 09:19:18 AM »
My daughter, granddaughter, great-granddaughter and Luis went to Wildwood yesterday.  They had asked me to go along but I knew it would be a really long day.  I did not know if I felt up to all that walking on the boardwalk in Wildwood, being on the beach for a lot of hours, and then driving back and forth to Wildwood all in one day. They left early in the morning and did not get home until about 2:00 AM this morning.  My daughter brought me back 2 slices of Mack's pizza.  I reheated the one slice early this morning, but only in the microwave.  The pizza stone was in the Blackstone oven, and I did not feel like taking the top off early this morning.  The Mack's slice was a lot better than the few last times I had slices of Mack's pizza.  The rim crust was breadier than I had recalled though.  I really can't understand how some of my customers think my boardwalk style of pizzas tastes like a real Mack's pizza.

Norma

Offline deb415611

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1872 on: August 17, 2014, 10:11:45 AM »
yours looks so much better Norma
Deb

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1873 on: August 17, 2014, 01:53:35 PM »
yours looks so much better Norma

Thanks so much Deb!

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #1874 on: August 17, 2014, 04:02:14 PM »
yours looks so much better Norma

I agree!


 

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