Author Topic: NJ Boardwalk Pizza  (Read 245995 times)

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Online norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #325 on: June 03, 2010, 09:29:13 PM »
Peter,

After much thought on rayjockís  post yesterday, I am now wondering if you think it might be possible that Mackís might be doing a one day ferment.  rayjock said he worked at Mackís over forty years ago, so a same day ferment now, seems unlikely to me.  How could Mackís determine how much dough they might need for the same day?  They would need to determine each day how much dough to make and any leftover dough might not be good for the next day.  After looking at some threads of same day fermentation and reading that the one day ferment gives a better flavor, such as a longer cold ferment, I canít say that when I tasted Mackís pizza, that their crust  had any characteristics of a long ferment.  I have never tried a one day ferment, other than a Sicilian dough, so I canít tell what the difference might be in a thin crust pizza in a one day ferment.

I had some Colby White Longhorn cheese here at home and tasted some today and also some mild white cheddar cheese.  In my opinion there isnít much difference, except the Colby White Longhorn was creamier.  I know by eating different kinds of Longhorn cheese, there can be different tastes from one brand to another.  This also has me puzzled.

I wanted to make another stab at a formula for a Mackís clone this weekend, but all this has me undecided.

Do you have any thoughts about the ferment times or cheese?

Norma


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #326 on: June 03, 2010, 10:20:50 PM »
Norma,

I usually go with my gut on these kinds of matters. It seems to me that a high volume operation will not cold ferment dough for several days. Mack's is not an artisan operation where I could easily imagine a long fermentation scenario. Also, looking at some of the recent Mack's pizzas, I don't see the signs of long fermentation. That was in good measure behind my comments in Reply 313 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9068.msg99531.html#msg99531 where I mentioned that I was considering a short fermentation time, possibly as little as a day (coupled with an increase in the amount of oil). If it weren't for the fact that the temperature here in Texas has been in the 90s lately and headed to around 100 degrees this weekend, I might have already started a new Mack's clone dough. That will have to wait until cooler weather sneaks in at some point.

It is also hard for me to imagine that Mack's hasn't changed something in the way it makes its doughs over the past 40 years. Unless you are trying to capture a Mack's pizza of many years ago, the best we can do at this point is to try to capture what Mack's is now doing. Managing inventory of dough balls is not a major problem, whether the dough balls are made and used the same day, or possibly the next day. However, the yeast quantity has to support both possibilities. Possibly the Mack's pizzas that we have seen with signs of long fermentation are made from dough held overnight or maybe even longer. That would most likely mean that Mack's has cooler capacity somewhere. Maybe rayjock can shed more light on how the Mack's dough was made and managed from an inventory standpoint when he was an employee.

There is not much that I can offer on the matter of cheese, given the limited choices I have here in Texas.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 03, 2010, 10:22:53 PM by Pete-zza »

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #327 on: June 03, 2010, 10:57:51 PM »
Peter,

I will work out a formula based on your last formula at, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9068.msg99472.html#msg99472 but will add more oil, less yeast and try a same day ferment to see what the results will be. 

What I meant in my lost post was I had been trying doughs with a longer ferment, when trying the Mackís clone and I havenít ever tried a same day dough.  If Mackís is still making the dough early in the morning and using it the same day, this is what had me puzzled.  All my NY style crusts have at least been a one day cold ferment.

At least I donít have any problems with finding different kinds of cheese here.  I can see you are at a disadvantage in Texas.

I can understand with the temperatures you have in Texas, that it would be too hot to make anything that would involve heating an oven.  When I was at market Tuesday, the temperature was about 88 degrees F and standing in front of the oven until around 5:00 was hot enough for me.  At least my granddaughter was graduating and I got to leave early.  I had enough of the heat and humidity.

Thanks for your insight,

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #328 on: June 04, 2010, 11:05:16 AM »
What I meant in my lost post was I had been trying doughs with a longer ferment, when trying the Mackís clone and I havenít ever tried a same day dough.  If Mackís is still making the dough early in the morning and using it the same day, this is what had me puzzled.  All my NY style crusts have at least been a one day cold ferment.

Norma,

In the days before commercial refrigeration existed, pizza operators made and used the dough the same day, using room temperature fermentation. If you are interested, you can read Evelyne Slomon's discussion of the typical ways that pizza operators made and used their dough, at Reply 38 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3443.msg29496/topicseen.html#msg29496. The advent of refrigeration made a big difference in how pizza operators made and managed their dough. The problem with using only room temperature fermentation was the lack of good temperature control, which introduced too many variables in the fermentation process. You can read Evelyne's comments on some of the early practices of the original NYC pizza operators at Reply 606 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg41054/topicseen.html#msg41054.

In the above vein, I remember one member, a pizza operator I was helping, who decided to use only emergency doughs made at room temperature and used throughout the course of the day. Apparently, his competitors were using much the same approach. I tried to talk him out of that approach but he gave it a try anyway, only to give up fairly quickly when he discovered how much room temperature could affect his dough. No doubt there are a few stragglers here and there who are still using same-day doughs fermented at room temperature, and maybe they have mastered all of the procedures and inventory issues, but I would guess that they are very much in the minority. They may also be using bulk dough from which pieces of dough are cut and run through a roller or sheeter of some kind. This cuts down equipment needs and labor considerably.

I have done some experimentation with same-day cold fermented doughs but with only limited success. The problem from my perspective is insufficient fermentation and, therefore, insufficient byproducts of fermentation to contribute to the finished crust flavor, taste, color, aroma and texture. Also, more yeast has to be used to increase the fermentation so that the dough balls are ready when needed. The dough will rise faster and produce more fermentation gases but the fermentation byproducts do not expand apace. The crusts may be better than those made from emergency doughs but not as good as those made from long, cold fermented doughs.

Knowing where Mack's dough making and management methods fall within the range of methods discussed above and in Evelyne's posts would give us more clues to the Mack's dough.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #329 on: June 04, 2010, 12:40:04 PM »
Peter,

That first link was really helpful and I learned a lot from it.  I didnít know Tom Lehmann and Evelyne Solomon were friends and learned from each other.  Seems like the Lehmann dough was formulated from a team effort.  It was also interesting about how the Lombardi formula came from the same person and Evelyne only mentioned it because you did a comparison.  I really liked how Evelyne said that Tom Lehmann gave her the science and she gave him the art of pizza making. Evelyne is a real artisan pizza maker.

Possibly after reading this, it might be how Mackís makes their dough in the morning.

REFRIGERATED DOUGH METHOD:
OBJECTIVE: dough is prepared during down time, divided into preweighed units, and placed into a retarder where it remains in a relatively stable condition for use on the following day.
PROBLEMS: Requires careful attention to dough temperature control; a walk-in retarder of sufficient capacity is required to hold a number of racks containing dough
MERITS: Not necessary to accurately predict daily sales, extra dough always on hand to fill unexpected sales and surplus dough can be carried over for use on the following day; good level of dough uniformity; convenience.

I also see Evelyne suggests for a longer dough she advises to use more sugar, not more yeast, if you are already using sugar in the dough.  Will have to think about that suggestion.

The second link you referenced really had me cracking up about how Tom Lehmann tried to so called ďdumpster divingĒ to find out how to make Evelyneís pizza at Pizzico Restaurant .  I canít believe not that long ago Tom Lehmann didnít even know how to make a authentic New Style pizza and was paid to find out how to go about it.  Seems like Tom Lehmann did learn a lot from Evelyne.  I also see how Evelyne talks about mastering a same day dough.  Tom Lehmann trying to reverse-engineer a dough still has me laughing.

I have wanted to try a same day room temperature fermented dough at some point, but have never gotten around to it.  I was reading up on that subject, but wonít try that experiment with this Mackís clone dough. 

Do you have think I should just try higher sugar amounts and not more yeast to keep the fermentation bubbles down on the skin?  When looking at the Mackís dough, there doesnít appear to be any bubbles, when opening their dough.  I do believe Mackís is using refrigeration, while storing their dough balls.

I donít have enough experience in dough making to be able to decide, which the best approach might be.

Thanks for the links,

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #330 on: June 04, 2010, 01:13:37 PM »
Norma

Master foods near me carries a Wisc. White mild cheddar in a 40lb block.  I am going to buy a block.  Would you mind if I sent you some to try?  Free, of course.

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #331 on: June 04, 2010, 01:50:40 PM »
I also see Evelyne suggests for a longer dough she advises to use more sugar, not more yeast, if you are already using sugar in the dough.  Will have to think about that suggestion.

Norma,

I, too, noted Evelyne's comments on sugar, at Reply 39 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3443.msg29501.html#msg29501. Having worked for so long on Lehmann NY style doughs, my practice has been not to add sugar inasmuch as the fermentation period was unlikely to go beyond three days (cold fermentation). Beyond that point, I might add some sugar for the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation as Tom routinely recommends. Tom's concern about the use of sugar is that the bottoms of crusts might turn brown prematurely or even burn if baked in a standard deck oven. To a certain extent, it depends on the oven, Apparently, some deck ovens can tolerate 1-2% sugar without any problem. I don't know how tolerant of sugar the Roto-Flex oven used by Mack's is. I found that that sugar was less of a problem in a standard home oven using a pizza stone. 

I'm not sure whether using more sugar in a Mack's clone dough will lead to materially reduced bubbling of the dough. Ordinary table sugar (sucrose) does take quite a while to be broken down into simple sugars that yeast uses as food so maybe that will slow down the formation of the bubbles. Using more yeast would seem to be a faster approach to bubbling provided there are enough simple sugars in the dough from all sources (natural) to produce more carbon dioxide. I have a Lehmann NY style dough in the works to which I added 1.5% sugar. I added it because I wasn't sure when I would use it and viewed it as insurance in case I let the dough go beyond three days.

In your case, it shouldn't hurt for you to use more sugar rather than more yeast for the approximately one-day dough that you are considering making. Maybe we can learn something from your results.

Peter


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #332 on: June 04, 2010, 06:26:13 PM »
ERASMO,

You are too kind.  Do you have something you might want to use the Wisconsin mild white cheddar for?  In light of rayjockís last post, he said they used white longhorn cheese in Mackís pizza years ago.  I did a taste test yesterday and canít really tell much difference in the taste of 2 kinds of mild white cheddar I have here at home, compared to the Colby White Longhorn.  I did just tasted the Yanceyís cheddar cheese curds at market today, that I had in the Deli Case at market and the taste of them is a much better taste than any of the other cheeses.  It even left a taste in my mouth like mozzarella.  They even were a few strings like good mozzarella.  I really donít think Mackís would be using an expensive cheese like Yanceyís, but am confused whether to try a longhorn or one of the mild cheddar cheeses I do have.  I donít have any idea of how these cheeses will taste after baking a Mackís clone.  I found out before some of the cheeses tasted a lot different after the bake.

If you have other uses for the 40 lb. block of Wisconsin mild white cheddar let me know.  I donít want you to waste money for something you wonít use.

We are still trying to figure out how the crust might be made.

Thanks,

Norma


Peter,

I was just thinking about when I made the Papa Johnís clone and how much sugar was in that formula.

You said when you were going to try a Papaís Johnís clone again, you were going to lower the salt to .0.75 %  after you tried the Apple pie clone at your reply:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg80777.html#msg80777

Did you ever try Papa Johnís clone with the 0.75% salt?

Since the Papa Johnís clone is also a fairly low hydration, lower IDY, more sugar, and more oil amounts as you replied:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg58197.html#msg58197

Do you think this could help figured this Mackís formula out in any way?  In using this formula there shouldnít be much expansion in the dough for a one day dough or if it had to be used the next day.  This dough was docked, but I could see how the crust could be flatten by the rigorous ways Mackís uses in opening their dough. I the only thing that might not work out would be the sugar amounts.  Maybe I am all wet on this, but was just thinking about when I tried to Papa Johnís clone and the ingredients that were used.

This was the formula I used when making the Papa Johnís clone:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg75889.html#msg75889

and what the finished crust looked like

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg76149.html#msg76149

Maybe I will add a little more sugar to see what might happen, I will think about all this. 

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #333 on: June 04, 2010, 07:43:39 PM »
Peter,

I was just thinking about when I made the Papa Johnís clone and how much sugar was in that formula.

You said when you were going to try a Papaís Johnís clone again, you were going to lower the salt to .0.75 %  after you tried the Apple pie clone at your reply:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg80777.html#msg80777

Did you ever try Papa Johnís clone with the 0.75% salt?

Since the Papa Johnís clone is also a fairly low hydration, lower IDY, more sugar, and more oil amounts as you replied:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg58197.html#msg58197

Do you think this could help figured this Mackís formula out in any way?  In using this formula there shouldnít be much expansion in the dough for a one day dough or if it had to be used the next day.  This dough was docked, but I could see how the crust could be flatten by the rigorous ways Mackís uses in opening their dough. I the only thing that might not work out would be the sugar amounts.  Maybe I am all wet on this, but was just thinking about when I tried to Papa Johnís clone and the ingredients that were used.

Norma,

I do not think that the Papa John's clone experience helps us divine the Mack's dough formulation. The Papa John's clone doughs contain over 7% oil and over 4% sugar. Also, the thickness factors for most of the PJ clones I made were over 0.14. The combination of these three elements will mean a fairly thick crust and crumb with a soft and tender characteristic. They do not encourage a lot of chewiness or cracker-like aspects in the rim of the crust. The last two Mack's clone doughs I made used much less oil and much less sugar than the PJ clone doughs and a thickness factor of around 0.08. Those efforts produced a result that did not remind me of PJ crusts, even considering that there are similarities of hydration and yeast levels. My thinking was more along the lines of a high-hydration version of DKM's cracker-style dough (see, for example, the last paragraph of Reply 3 in this thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9068.msg78465.html#msg78465) or the De Lorenzo clone doughs I experimented with, both of which include sugar and oil. With respect to the De Lorenzo clone effort, see the De Lorenzo clone dough formulation at Reply 117 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7841.msg45060.html#msg45060. The pizza made using that formulation had a more cracker-like character than a Mack's clone crust because of its lower thickness factor (a bit over 0.05) and resulting thinner crust.

With respect to reducing the salt in the PJ clone doughs to 0.75%, I did not proceed with that plan. If you read a few posts later than the one you referenced, you will see that member November challenged my math and ultimately convinced me that there was more than 0.75% salt in a real PJ crust.

Peter


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #334 on: June 04, 2010, 08:45:48 PM »
Norma

I did not realize the longhorn was NOT cheddar. 

I thought is was a type of white mild cheddar.

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #335 on: June 04, 2010, 09:06:44 PM »
Norma

I did not realize the longhorn was NOT cheddar. 

I thought is was a type of white mild cheddar.


ERASMO,

I think the longhorn is a kind of mild white cheddar, but am not sure.  It doesn't say on the label it is a cheddar.  I will have to look it up, but thought that the longhorn cheese is just cheddar that isn't aged. 

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #336 on: June 04, 2010, 09:12:37 PM »
Peter,

I didnít read far enough in your post before about you saying the pizza wasnít particularly cracker-like, but more a combination of a chewy, crispy and crunchy crust.  Then you said it was like a combination of a NY style and a thin and crispy style.  I just thought when you referenced that post before, that I sure didnít think the Mackís pizza crust was a cracker-style. I can now see there are some characteristics of a Mackís crust in those photos.

Your De Lorenzo clone looks promising, also.  I could imagine Mackís pizza being something like a De Lorenzoís pie, because before, I also noted that both the Mack family and Manco family apparently came from Trenton NJ and learn their pizza making skills there before going to the shore.

I remember November challenging you about the salt, but didnít remember what happened, because you were also posting about the Papa Johnís Applepie and the salt used in the Applepie. I sure didnít understand anything about nutritional data back then.

I still am not sure how to proceed, but your links and ideas will help me to decide.

Thanks,

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #337 on: June 04, 2010, 09:20:49 PM »
I think the longhorn is a kind of mild white cheddar, but am not sure.  It doesn't say on the label it is a cheddar.  I will have to look it up, but thought that the longhorn cheese is just cheddar that isn't aged. 


Norma and ERASMO,

Since I had not heard of the term "longhorn" as applied to white cheddar cheese, I did a Google search. As noted at http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/longhorn%20cheese!opendocument&startkey=longhorn%20cheese, it appears that the term "longhorn" applies to a particular shape and size of a block of cheese. The last sentence of the referenced article indicates that the actual cheese can be "mild cheddar".

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #338 on: June 04, 2010, 09:26:16 PM »
Peter and ERASMO,

This is what I found out about the Colby Longhorn I have here at home.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colby_cheese

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #339 on: June 04, 2010, 09:39:28 PM »
I just took a picture of the Colby Longhorn, the regular white cheddar and the Biery mild cheddar cheese.  The Colby Longhorn, just has more holes and is more creamy when eaten.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #340 on: June 04, 2010, 09:41:55 PM »
Your De Lorenzo clone looks promising, also.  I could imagine Mackís pizza being something like a De Lorenzoís pie, because before, I also noted that both the Mack family and Manco family apparently came from Trenton NJ and learn their pizza making skills there before going to the shore.

Norma,

I recalled that you mentioned the De Lorenzo's/Mack's/Manco connection, but until you brought up the subject of sugar and oil earlier today I hadn't thought to look at the De Lorenzo dough clone formulations, although I vaguely recalled using sugar and oil in the De Lorenzo clone doughs. The challenge then was to get pizza cuts that were stiff from the edge to the center (i.e., not floppy), without a crackery overall crust but with a hard rim that gave one's jaws a workout. The Mack's clone pizzas I made did not have those characteristics even with the similarity of dough formulations. It's possible that with the much larger size (18") of the Mack's clone pizzas and the thicker crusts (larger value of thickness factor), the Mack's clone pizzas had a much different character.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #341 on: June 06, 2010, 09:25:27 PM »
Okay, Pinocchio and Gepetto wanted to help me with the Mackís clone, again today.  I asked them if they are willing to help today and guess what they said!  No, we just want to watch.  Well...I had to do something about that, since they also want this pizza to turn into a Mackís clone.  I said since they only wanted to watch I am going to pick the song today and also have a clone Pinocchio join me, since he was willing to help.  Clone Pinocchio and I picked the song today. Maybe all this will help, but again, maybe not.



I mixed the clone dough earlier this morning to try and simulate how the dough might be made in the morning and used some time during the day or possibly the next day. 

This is the formula I used.


Flour (100%):    284.47 g  |  10.03 oz | 0.63 lbs
Water (55%):      156.46 g  |  5.52 oz | 0.34 lbs
IDY (0.35%):      1 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.33 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
Salt (2%):                 5.69 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.19 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
Olive Oil (6%):    17.07 g | 0.6 oz | 0.04 lbs | 3.79 tsp | 1.26 tbsp
Sugar (2%):                   5.69 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.43 tsp | 0.48 tbsp
Total (165.35%):     470.37 g | 16.59 oz | 1.04 lbs | TF = 0.08252

For this attempt, I increased the yeast, oil, and sugar.  I forgot to add a bowl residue, but got the bowl fairly clean.

The flour was sifted and the dough was mixed by hand.  I left the dough sit on the counter for an hour before putting it into the refrigerator.  I took the dough ball out of the refrigerator today at 4:00 pm. and left it warm up for until I just made the pie about an hour ago.  I didnít want to let the dough out that long, but other things preoccupied me. 

Seems like there is always a problem with something I try.  O well, I did weigh the dough ball and it weighed 1.01 lb.  I also weighed the Beiry Mild White Cheddar and it was 6 oz.  I weighed the Gangi sauce and it weighed, 7 oz.  I pressed hard on the skin and it opened nicely.  I then got the cheese I had grated out of the refrigerator and started to put the first layer on the pizza.  I donít know why, but the grated white cheddar wanted to stick together.  Next the Gangi sauce.  I started to put it on the pizza and realized I forgot to add water to thin it down.  Well no use adding water now, because I already started.  I had to weigh out another 1 oz. of sauce.  That is the reason the sauce looks so thick and blotchy.  I sprinkled the remainder of the cheese over the pie.  My big peel at market was left on top of my oven and Friday when I went to market, it must have rained and came down my vent.  Well the peel was warped, so I thought I would bring it home and try to get it straightened out and also use it today.  I loaded the pie onto the pizza stone.  After it started to bake, I looked though the window of the oven.  Low and behold there were big bubbles just forming on the one side of the pizza.  Quick grab the fork. 

When the pie was almost finished baking, I remembered I forgot to rig up some way to weigh the baked pizza.  Well I tried different ways and none of them were working with my metal peel in combination with something else. Quick check the pie again.  It was finished, but I still didnít have my metal peel and something else to weigh the pie.  Until I found something the pie was a little overbaked.  The freshly baked pie weighed 1.69 lb.  Some of the cheese dripped off the side of the baking stone, again.

I even had my beachfront property I purchased in Wildwood to help.

O well, just another day in pizza making.

Norma


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #342 on: June 06, 2010, 09:27:13 PM »
more pictures

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #343 on: June 06, 2010, 09:30:57 PM »
2 more pictures..said file size too large  :-\

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #344 on: June 06, 2010, 09:32:17 PM »
last two pictures

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #345 on: June 06, 2010, 10:04:25 PM »
Norma,

I think you very nicely captured the Mack's look of the rim and bottom crust. Also, it appears that your unbaked pizza weight was in line with what I calculated using the numbers for my last 18" pizza. Based on your before and after weight numbers (30.16 ounces and 27.04 ounces, respectively), the weight loss was about 10.3%.

How did you like the pizza? And do you have any other assessments or observations?

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #346 on: June 06, 2010, 10:27:39 PM »
Peter,

Thanks for saying the rim and bottom crust looked like Mackís. Good to hear my numbers were in line with yours.

The pizza was good, but over baked, as I said in my last post.  The mild white cheddar I used still didnít taste like a Mackís pizza.  I think the next time I give this a Mackís clone a try, I will use longhorn and see how that goes.  The sauce did taste like Mackís, but then it is the same sauce Mackís uses.  I added just oregano and grated black pepper to the sauce.  The skin didnít have as many  bubbles this time and although I just made the dough today, the crust still had a good flavor.  Even with using a lower hydration, the dough still worked out well.  I donít know if I left the dough out to warm-up to long or what happened with the big bubbles on the one side of the crust when baking.  I used the infrared thermometer and the oven was 500 degrees F.  I don't know why the white cheddar cheese wanted to stick together, either.  After I grated it, I put it right back into the refrigerator until I was ready to use it.  Maybe the mild white cheddar I did use today would have tasted better if the pie wasn't over baked.

Do you have any other suggestions on how to approach this Mackís clone in terms of the dough formulation? 

I was really warm and humid here this morning, but they were calling for a cool front to come though this afternoon, so I thought I would give the Mackís clone another try.  At least the kitchen didnít get hot and just with the windows open, the temperature was okay.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #347 on: June 06, 2010, 10:51:43 PM »
Do you have any other suggestions on how to approach this Mackís clone in terms of the dough formulation? 

Norma,

After I have had a chance to revisit things I may have some new ideas. But, for now, I don't have anything new to offer. As I noted before, I was considering doing something along the lines of what you did although I hadn't decided on whether to make a same-day dough or a next-day dough. In some respects, a next-day dough provides greater flexibility from a planning and inventory management standpoint than a same-day dough although, as I noted before, it should be possible to come up with a dough formulation that can be used both same day and next day. In fact, that could help explain the many different looks we have seen for the Mack's pizzas.   

No doubt the 6% olive oil added to the crust flavor. You perhaps also got the wheat flavor of the high-gluten flour.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #348 on: June 07, 2010, 11:50:27 PM »
Looks really great  ;D Bet it tastes even better!

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #349 on: June 08, 2010, 06:19:30 AM »
hotwawce,

Thanks for saying the Mackís clone looks great, but I over baked it.   The taste of the crust was good, but we are having problems with finding a mild cheddar cheese that tastes like a real Mackís pizza.  Even if we found out what brand of mild white cheddar the real Mackís pizza uses, it would be a problem for members to find their brand, because it is probably purchased in 40 lb. blocks.  That is why we are trying different brands that can be purchased at a regular grocery store. I am trying different kinds of mild white cheddar, that can be purchased at a regular grocery store to see if any of those mild white cheddars might have the same flavor as a real Mackís pizza.  This is a continuing journey, just as the video I posted in reply #341.  When the elephant is flying with the monkey and searching for a shooting star to wish on, we really know elephants canít fly, but we can dream of something happening, which it might not.  I donít know if we will ever be able to find a mild white cheddar that will compare with a real Mackís pizza, but I can wish.

The crust is coming along okay, but still needs some work.  Trying to clone a pie is difficult.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:21:50 AM by norma427 »