Author Topic: NJ Boardwalk Pizza  (Read 254719 times)

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Online norma427

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #75 on: April 23, 2010, 05:19:09 PM »
The five test dough balls for the Mackís pizza were made this afternoon.  I used Kyrol flour and changed the formula to 59 % hydration.  The ambient temperature at market today was 62 degrees F.  I did mix the dough for a longer time than I usually do.  I first mixed the flour and water until they were incorporated, then mixed the IDY, then salt, and finally the olive oil.  The total mix time was 18 minutes.  I was surprised that the olive oil took so long to incorporate.  The dough did turn out smooth and was a lot different than my normal poolish dough.  The final dough temperature coming off the hook was 71 degrees F.  After the dough was transferred onto the bench the dough temperature then dropped to 70 degrees F.  I then weighed each ball and formed the dough balls. Then poppy seeds were placed on them to see how much they ferment.  I brought one dough ball home to try either Saturday or Sunday, depending how much they do ferment.

Since only my overhead light was on today, the pictures are darker than usual.

Norma
« Last Edit: April 23, 2010, 05:22:12 PM by norma427 »


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #76 on: April 23, 2010, 06:02:15 PM »
Norma,

One of the things that I discovered when attempting to reverse engineer a well known pizza, especially one that I have never eaten before, is that there is no clear benchmark. For example, when I did my research on Mack and M&M, the descriptors that I saw most frequently used to describe their pizzas were "thin" and "crispy" (followed by "oily", "too little sauce and cheese", and "expensive"). Their pizzas were said to "look" like a NY style but were not NY style pizzas, and they were not particularly "chewy". Some said that the pizzas were a cross between a NY style and a cracker style. I suppose that both descriptions can be correct. For example, a Mack's pizza right out of the oven will have slices that drip of oil and droop and can be folded and eaten like a NY style, as was noted in the YouTube video at . But, when the pizza cools off, the crust, and especially the rim, can become more cracker like, with greater rigidity in the slices

When I looked at photos and videos of the Mack's and M&M pizzas, I saw pizzas that had crusts that were light in color and pizzas that had darker crusts, and also darker bottoms. Some of the pizzas had distinct rims but others were almost rimless. Some of the pizzas showed signs of long fermentation whereas others showed little or none. Maybe Mack's et al have the same problems as we do with seemingly random, hard to explain blistering. Possibly some of the above factors can be explained away by noting that different pizza makers make the pizzas, in their own distinctive way, at different times of day, at different locations, and with oven temperatures that may vary based on ordering patterns and other factors. It's also possible that Mack's et al have emergency dough versions of their regular doughs and that the ingredients used to make the pizzas vary over a period of time. 

Like you, I noted certain parallels with the Trenton style as exemplified by the DeLorenzo's dough/pizza. Both use doughs that are quite extensible (see the DeLorenzo dough at the links referenced in Reply 155 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7841.msg58419.html#msg58419). It was reported several times at the DeLorenzo thread (at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7841.0.html) that the flour used by DeLorenzo's is all-purpose flour, although I don't recall that the skins were tossed. The sequence of placement of shredded mozzarella cheese and sauce used by DeLorenzo's to make a basic pizza is the same as used by Mack's et al. The DeLorenzo pizzas are considerably smaller than those made at Mack's et al, and they are cut family-style rather than the standard way. The cheeses and sauces are different also. DeLorenzo's uses deck ovens, but so did Mack's in the beginning (although the DeLorenzo ovens may run hotter). If I had to guess, the doughs made at Mack's et al are more hydrated than the DeLorenzo's dough and the crusts are perhaps thicker. At the DeLorenzo's thread, it was repeatedly noted that the DeLorenzo crusts have a distinct cracker like quality and that the pieces can be held out straight without drooping.

Since you know what a Mack's pizza should look and taste like, at least as you recall their pizzas, it will be interesting to see what you come up with.

Peter

« Last Edit: April 23, 2010, 06:05:41 PM by Pete-zza »

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #77 on: April 23, 2010, 07:25:00 PM »
Peter,

The pizzas I remember are thin, but not crispy in my opinion.  Maybe sometimes the rim was crispy, after it cooled down some, but I donít recall the rest of the crust being crispy.  The Mackís pizzas donít droop as much as some NY style pies, but there are other NY pies I have tasted that the crust are about the same as Mackís.  I have eaten in many pizza places in NY, in most of the boroughs, but they were just regular pizza places.  Every time I have been to NY, which has been many times over the last 12 years, I usually try another place, just to see what they taste like.  Maybe since ERASMO was just at Mackís last week, he can give some more opinions on how the crust was.

The cheese always wanted to drip off the pizza, if you ate the pizza right in their place, just like the video you referenced in the link.  Your paper plate was always full of grease.  If you let the pie cool down, then the cheese changed, even if you reheated it.

I canít ever remember the crusts being light, but I could guess by having different pie makers manning the ovens, there could be different crust colors.  I can believe there even could be a difference in the crust if they let their dough ferment for a day longer or would have to make an emergency dough.  I just am trying to think about how they can store all those dough balls in some of Mackís or Mack and Mancoís that are smaller.  If they are storing them in the basement, they make many pies in a days time. Even with using racks and dough trays, some of the Mackís and Mack and Mancoís are small in size.

When I started making pizza at a lower hydration, I still had some doughs that seemed to stretch forever as seen in this picture at Reply #55 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8341.msg74713.html#msg74713 I sure didnít have much management with my dough back then.  :-D

I still wonder about the dough at DeLorenzo's being similar.  I read somewhere that a man commented on how he would like to have the pies together to compare, because he thought they were alike.  That made me wonder if he had tried all three pies, because he had commented on their similarity. 

I hope I can get down to Mackís in May and see what my opinion is now. I would observe a lot more. I still can remember the taste of Mackís pizza, so at least that might help me to know if the pizza tastes right, while doing the tests.  This is a pizza I never will forget.

I donít know how much the difference is in mild cheddar cheeses or what Mackís really uses.  Maybe we will find this out in time.

I can imagine how hard it is to reverse engineer a pizza.  You have done this with success.  :)  I hope with time we will get this figured out.

I am also anxious to hear how scott r experiment is going.  I wonder if his dough looked anything like mine?

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #78 on: April 23, 2010, 08:07:41 PM »
Norma,

I like to work the numbers. For example, I would be interested in knowing what a typical dough ball at Mack's weighs or, failing that, the weight of a typical fully baked pizza with only sauce and cheese. If I were to go to Mack's, I would bring a tape measure, scale and camera with me. In your case, since you are a professional from an alien land (Pennsylvania) and not a likely competitor threatening their enterprise, they might confide in you about their pizzas, including type/brand of flour used, dough ball weight and typical bake temperatures/times (you will also be able to view the temperature display for their oven). I'm sure that you would also survey the operation for signs of how they make their pizzas (e.g., mixer, coolers, etc).

The video you posted earlier, taken together with data like dough ball/pizza weight, would seem to be valuable to estimate the amount of sauce and cheeses to use. There is no exactitude on amount of sauce and cheeses used at Mack's, because of the free-throwing of cheeses and the hose method for the sauce, so a modest variation would not alter things in any material way. If you can get a sauce that is similar to what Mack's uses, and run a few cheese blend experiments, and use your oven at market, you might come pretty close to what Mack's does.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #79 on: April 23, 2010, 09:30:41 PM »


Peter,

I can always see you are about numbers, but this time is different.  If I get to go to Mackís I will take the needed equipment along.  I kind of doubt they would confide in me about their pizzas, but it is worth a try.  I will ask the questions and also note what is going on inside their pizza business.  The times I was there, I never saw a mixer, so that leads me to believe they are making the dough in the basement.  When scott r said he talked to his friend that worked there, he also might know the answers to those unanswered questions. 

I would like to know a starting point for the cheese, but canít estimate how much cheese they use.  When making the test pie on Tuesday, just to see how the cheese tasted on the finished pie, it didnít taste anything like Mackís.  I didnít measure how much cheese Steve and I put on that pie, but will weigh the amounts of both cheeses this time and also the sauce. I think my sauce was a little to thick on Tuesday.  I also use different herbs in the sauce for market, so that could have affected the overall taste.  I really donít think they use that much sauce on their pizzas.  I will use the cake decorator again to apply the sauce. 

I believe the best place to test the Mackís pizza is at market, also.  Hopefully the dough is okay Tuesday.  I can then try more pizzas at home to see what kind of results can be achieved in my home oven.  There are so many members on this forum that are very creative in their use of a home oven, so if we all ever get this figured out, then any member that wanted to taste a Mackís style pizza could.  We will all see what happens.

I have already checked the dough in my refrigerator 3 times since I came home from market.  :-D


Norma 

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #80 on: April 24, 2010, 09:04:35 AM »
I have been corresponding with the man that wrote about DeLorenzoís pizza being similar to Mack and Manco's pizza.

Here is some of what he wrote in the two times we have corresponded.  Maybe we can also get more information about DeLorenzoís pies.  ::)

I grew up about 1,500 feet from DeLorenzo's on Hamilton Avenue. I go there about ten times a year.It is superb. It is a thin very crispy crusted pizza that features a clean flavor of superior olive oil, and fresh tomato flavor. I must get down to Ocean City to taste Mack and Manco's soon. I always loved it's flavor in the past. Maruca's on the boardwalk in Seaside Park is also of high quality.
P.S. I had a very good pie this afternoon in Trenton: Papa's Tomato Pies, the second oldest pizzeria in America.

My family goes out to Lancaster County about once a year. I believe I know where you are, not far from Greystone Manor. I'll have to look you up if we come there this summer. I'll ask what type of flour they use, but one thing I do know is that their use of olive oil is of the highest quality; that is, it isn't just an ordinary blend it's pure olive oil, perhaps extra virgin, which costs more but tastes superior. I am not a baker but the aroma OUTSIDE DeLorenzo's is of the fine smell of good quality olive oil. That much I know. Are you Amish? We've been coming to Pennsylvania for decades. We love the Amish and we love your area.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #81 on: April 24, 2010, 07:07:54 PM »
Pinocchio is a fictional character that first appeared in 1883, in The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi,  Carved from a piece of pine by a woodcarver named Geppetto in a small Italian village, he was created as a wooden puppet, but dreamt of becoming a real boy. The name Pinocchio is a Tuscan word meaning "pine nutĒ.

The story of Pinocchio is fascinating. It goes along the story lines of... "Every time you tell a lie, your nose will grow. When you tell the truth, it will shrink," said the Blue Fairy.

In Disneyís production of ďPinocchioĒ, Jiminy Cricket watches Geppeto  finish the work on Pinocchio.  The Blue Fairy asks if Jiminy would serve as Pinocchio's conscience, a task he accepts.  There are many adventures in this Disney production, but in the end, the Blue Fairy decides that Pinocchio has proven himself unselfish and thus fulfills her promise to turn him into a real boy, bringing him back to life, much to the delight of Geppetto and Jiminy.

When Jiminy Cricket sings he song "When You Wish upon a Star", it reminds me of wishing for this dough to turn into a Mackís pizza.  Pinocchio and Geppetto are also standing over the dough wishing the same thing.  :)

The poppy seeds are expanding laterally, but Pinocchio and Geppeto said to wait until tomorrow to try and make the pizza.  I guess they know what they are talking about.  ::)

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #82 on: April 25, 2010, 03:54:35 PM »
This is the first attempt to make a pie like Mackís at home.  I ran into some problems today, while trying to make this pie.  I had planned out how I was going to make this pie.  The one problem was I took the dough ball out of the refrigerator this morning at 9:00 am to let it warm up.  I then should have grated the cheese at market, because my food processor or grater doesnít grate the cheese as coarsely. As a starting point with the cheeses, I used 5.5 oz. of mild white cheddar and 5.5 oz. of Mozzarella.  Since I am not sure if Mackís uses all mild white cheddar or what their blend is, this would give me a good start in deciding if I needed to go up or down with the mozzarella.
I used 10 oz. of the Full Red Sauce and added 1 gr of Garlic powder. This sauce seems to have a very fresh flavor. It looked like about the same consistency as what Mackís uses in their hoses. Next I measured out 1 gr of oregano to put on the top of the pizza, before going into the oven.   

The dough ball coming out of the refrigerator did look like the first two pictures, top and bottom.  I didnít expect any company today, but about 10:00 am, company came.  Of course I was happy to receive company, but didnít pay any attention to the dough ball on the table.  The dough ball stayed on the table about an hour more than I wanted it to. I then looked at the dough ball and by looking at the poppy seeds could see the dough was really starting to ferment more than I had planned. Third picture below. The dough ball was then put back into the refrigerator until I could heat the oven and get the other things out I needed. 

I must have had a duh moment when thinking about making this pizza and didnít plan very well.  I forgot I had taken my larger peel to market, incase my other one would spit.  I only then had an almost 14" peel to use.  Well..I proceeded. 

I took the dough ball out of the refrigerator and didnít give it anymore warm up time.  The dough handled well and I could even toss it.  Then another dilemma. Mission Control..we do have a problem. How do you put a 16" inch pizza on the smaller peel.  The sides draped over the two side edges.  I proceeded and dressed the pie.  When I went to put the pie on the stone, the edge of the one side stuck to the stone before I could get the pizza off the peel.  Well finally I got the pizza on the stone. Of course some of the cheese had to drip off on the one side and made a burnt mess in the bottom of the oven.  The pizza then baked.

When I opened the oven door it did smell like a Mackís pizza.  I was then anxious to taste it.  In my opinion it didnít have enough mild white cheddar and I will need to add more mild white cheddar and less mozzarella the next time.  The sauce did closely resemble the Mackís pizza.

The stars werenít aligned today.

Norma

Edit:  The sauce and cheese weren't placed to the edges as much as I had planned, because I wondered what was going to happen with the smaller peel.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 08:04:23 AM by norma427 »

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #83 on: April 25, 2010, 03:56:36 PM »
rest of pictures

Norma


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #84 on: April 26, 2010, 08:55:28 AM »
A slice of the pizza made yesterday was reheated this morning to see if I could detect the flavor of the white mild cheddar cheese.  I first sampled a small part of a slice cold.  Then reheated the rest of the slice.  What surprised me, was I couldnít detect much white cheddar flavor.  I sample the mild white cheddar cheese plus the 2 kinds of mozzarella when I grate them each week at market.  I am now wondering how much cheddar could be used or if Mackís might use a medium or sharp cheddar. I donít think there is much difference in cheddar in relation to color because they add a coloring additive to cheddar that comes from a plant extract of the achiote tree called annatto, which gives some cheddar the darker or orange color.  Since I want to try to make this Mackís pizza as authentic as I can, I donít want to use colored cheddar. 

When I talk to my supplier of the cheeses I use at market, I sometimes talk to him about what kinds of blends different pizza businesses are using around our area.  From what he has told me, there arenít a lot of businesses that are using a lot of cheddar in their blend.  I will have to ask him again about what kinds of cheddar they carry.  They do supply deli's with cheese, so they should also carry the mild or sharp cheddar.

I read somewhere on the web that Mackís might be using a stronger cheddar than the mild.  Does anyone have any opinions on this or have experiences in using a medium or sharp cheddar, when making a pizza? 

I am also curious about scott r made out with his pizza and how it looked and tasted.  ::)

I did edit my last post on why the cheese and sauce weren't put to the edges more.

Norma
« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 09:09:36 AM by norma427 »

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #85 on: April 26, 2010, 10:09:53 AM »
Norma,

When I was playing around with the Papa Gino's clone doughs/pizzas, I used a blend of low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese, New York sharp white cheddar cheese, and grated Romano cheese. The NY sharp white cheddar cheese was the only white cheddar cheese that I could find at my local supermarket that was reasonably priced. The ratios I tried were 70/28/2 (mozz/cheddar/Romano) and 75/23/2. I could detect the white cheddar cheese in both blends. Interestingly, when I later had a real Papa Gino's pizza, I could not tell that the cheese blend included cheddar cheese. I suspect that PGs was either using a mild white cheddar cheese or a stronger white cheddar cheese in small amounts.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #86 on: April 26, 2010, 10:40:42 AM »
Peter,

Thanks you for telling me what your experiences were is using the sharp white cheddar in the blend.  That is also interesting that you then didnít note the taste of cheddar when you tried the real Papa Gino's pizza.  I also notice when using my blend at market you canít detect the mild white cheddar in the finished pizza.

I think, but donít know, that whatever Mackís is using by the way of cheese,  this is why their pizza tastes so different.  The pizza I made yesterday had the smell of Mackís pizza, but not the taste in the cheese.  Even this morning when I ate some cold and then reheated, I couldnít really taste the cheddar that much.  I believed in time, this could be something that could be figured out.

Maybe someone else will also have an opinion on the cheddar cheese.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #87 on: April 26, 2010, 11:39:42 AM »
Norma,

You might recall from the video at that the young father held up a slice of the Mack's pizza to let it drip, at which point the cheeses started to slide off the slice, at about 1:15-1:22 of the video. Since the pizza was a basic cheese pizza without any other toppings, the dripping would have to come from either or both of the sauce and cheeses. I also recall from my reading that customers frequently complained that the Mack's pizzas were excessively oily, and I remember that one commentor blamed the cheddar cheese. As you know, different cheeses have different amounts of fat (e.g., whole milk versus part-skim and mozzarella versus cheddar) and can oil off differently during the bake. The amount of cheese(s) will also be a factor, as well as the condition of the pizza at the time of eating. For example, in the video, the pizza looked like it was hot right out of the oven and had not yet cooled as to allow the cheeses and fats to congeal.

When I checked the Nutrition Facts for the LMPS mozzarella cheese and the NY sharp white cheddar cheese currently in my refrigerator, the cheddar cheese has 50% more total fat than the LMPS mozzarella cheese for a same-size serving (one ounce). If you can replicate the cheese types and amounts so that a freshly baked slice drips of the fats and other liquids, you might be able to come closer to the cheese aspect of the Mack's clone that you are after.

Peter

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #88 on: April 26, 2010, 12:15:42 PM »
Peter,

Thanks you going over the video and also Nutritional Facts on the two cheeses you have.  That is interesting you have noted that the cheddar has much more fat than the mozzarella.  I will look on the Nutritional Facts on the white cheddar when I go to market today.  That will give another clue in what might be in the cheeses.  I will have to call my supplier and see if he knows any thing else about what kinds of cheddar he carries or also their fat content.  I will do that in the next few days.  I now 3 different cheeses in my blend at market and will also see what their fat content is.

As to the cheese sliding off the pies at Mack's, that is part of the experience in their pies being different.  When they are hot, you try to keep all the cheese on while taking a bite.  The cheese is really gooey.  If you look at ERASMOís pictures of the pie he purchased it appears the pie has cooled down some. The customers that complain that the cheese is too oily, probably arenít the ones that enjoy this type of pizza.

I have been corresponding with another person that is working at Wildwood this year.  This person has eaten Mackís pizza 4 times this year, so far. He has worked at Wildwood for the past few years. His only complaint was the one day he went to get a slice and it had to be reheated and then the slice wasnít good...hmmm

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #89 on: April 26, 2010, 02:54:01 PM »
norma, I wish I had a camera to show you the pizza I made, but I dont.   All I can say is that I am pretty sure the 59% hydration seems about right.   Also, my friend that worked at macs didn't remember there being two cheeses blended together.   I think you should try 100% mild white cheddar from wisconsin. 

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #90 on: April 26, 2010, 05:54:09 PM »
scott r,

Thanks for telling me the 59% hydration seems about right and also telling that I should try all white cheddar.  I had also wondered about that since you said in your other post, that your friend didnít remember unloading anything but mild white cheddar.  When I tasted the pie it seemed like there wasnít enough mild white cheddar.  I have the mild white cheddar from Wisconsin, but am not sure if itís the right kind.  I did just grate white cheddar today and have it in a separate container to try tomorrow.  This what my dough ball looked like today, from Friday.  I wish I could have seen your pie and also tasted it.  :)  Did you ever eat pizza at Mackís or Mack and Manco?  Did your friend give you an opinion on how he thought Mackís pies were?

Norma

Peter,

I did check on my cheeses today and found that 1 oz. of mild white cheddar had 9 gr. of fat, low moisture whole cheese mozzarella had 7 gr of fat, and 1950 Brand 127 low moisture part skim mozzarella had 5 gr of fat.  After reading what scott r just posted and seeing the amount of fat in the mild white cheddar, I could now believe how the cheese would get gooey and slide off, if this is what they are using in the Mackís pie.  This could then create part of the unique taste of Mackís and Mack and Manco.

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #91 on: April 26, 2010, 09:57:36 PM »
Norma,  without re reading the whole thread,  I remember you saying that the sauce went on top of the pizza at Mack's.  That would further suggest a 100% cheddar blend to me,  as the top sauce would keep the cheddar from burning up.  Also,  fwiw,  the sharper the cheddar,  the quicker it breaks and burns in my experience.  -marc


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #92 on: April 26, 2010, 10:19:19 PM »
widespreadpizza,

No need to re read this whole thread. There are two layers of cheese that go on the pizza.  If you look at this video it shows how the pies are dressed.
 


I appreciate the information how sharper cheddar breaks down and burns.  :) I never tried sharp cheddar on a pie, so my experience is limited. 

Thanks for your help,

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #93 on: April 26, 2010, 10:51:28 PM »
Norma,

I went to Bova today. I have a can of Gangi for you. I'll bring it along tomorrow.

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #94 on: April 26, 2010, 10:57:34 PM »
Norma,

I went to Bova today. I have a can of Gangi for you. I'll bring it along tomorrow.

Steve,

Great news to hear!  ;D  We will get to try the Mack's pizza tomorrow.  With all the help the forum members are giving, hopefully we will someday get this pizza right.

Thanks so much,  :)

Norma


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #95 on: April 28, 2010, 09:03:08 AM »
Steve brought the Gangi Supreme with basil to market yesterday as can be seen in the picture below.  We both tasted the sauce right out of the can.  Since I had also tasted the Full Red right out of the can, I didnít like the taste of the Gangi near as much.  We had to add water to the Gangi to get as near as we thought would be the consistency of Mackís sauce.  We then decided the sauce needed a extra kick, so we added Ĺ tsp. sugar and 1/4 tsp. garlic powder. This was added to 18 oz. of the Gangi sauce. We put 18 oz. of Gangi sauce in the cake decorating kit to apply the sauce.  Of course some of the sauce stuck to the bag of the cake decorating kit and not all was applied to the pizza.

We used 12 oz. of mild white cheddar that was grated with the Pelican Head.  When I had grated the cheese on Monday, it had seemed to coarse, so I put it though the grater, again. 

While we were making the pizza, I was anxious to try the finished product.  I kept smelling to see if I could detect the smell of Mackís pizza, but I couldnít. 

I should have applied more sauce to the edges. 

This dough was very easy to open and it could be twirled many times in the air.  Although I am not a professional twirler like Mackís piemen, I had fun twirling the dough.  The dough didnít tear, after repeatedly throwing into the air.  Steve commented that you could keep stretching this dough almost forever.

Although the cheese was gooey, runny and did have a lot of grease like Mackís pizza, in my opinion the taste of the cheddar wasnít strong enough.  Wonder what kind of cheddar cheese Mackís uses. ::)

When Steve and I tasted the finished pizza the Gangi sauce in baked pizza did taste like Mackís pizza in my opinion.

I gave Steve a dough ball and froze the other two to experiment with.

Any opinions on what kind of cheddar to try next?  ???

I was talking to Steve about wondering since I am now making pizza, if this pizza isnít a fantasy in my mind because it was my favorite pizza for so many years.  I will have to wait and see if I get to taste the real Mackís pizza, if this just stuck in my mind for so many years or if it is something that is still special to me.  Steve and I both enjoyed the gooey, runny, greasy cheese.

At least I didn't have the problems of the peel not being the right size and the pizza sticking to the stone today.  The stars are getting better.  :-D

Norma
« Last Edit: April 28, 2010, 09:12:36 AM by norma427 »

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #96 on: April 28, 2010, 09:06:27 AM »
rest of pictures

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #97 on: April 28, 2010, 09:44:39 AM »
Norma

What was your final dough formulation?


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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #98 on: April 28, 2010, 09:51:30 AM »
Norma

What was your final dough formulation?



ERASMO,

This is what I used for the formula.  Are you going to give the Mack's pizza a try, also?

Mackís test-5 dough balls 59% hydration



Flour (100%):        1569.32 g  |  55.36 oz | 3.46 lbs
Water (59%):          925.9 g  |  32.66 oz | 2.04 lbs
IDY (0.20%):             3.14 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.04 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):           27.46 g | 0.97 oz | 0.06 lbs | 5.72 tsp | 1.91 tbsp
Olive Oil (2.5%):        39.23 g | 1.38 oz | 0.09 lbs | 8.72 tsp | 2.91 tbsp
Total (163.45%):   2565.05 g | 90.48 oz | 5.65 lbs | TF = 0.09
Single Ball:   513.01 g | 18.1 oz | 1.13 lbs

Thanks for your help with the Gangi sauce.  :)

Norma

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Re: NJ Boardwalk Pizza
« Reply #99 on: April 28, 2010, 09:58:12 AM »
Norma

My espionage will continue.  I am down  the shore every weekend and will continue my "Research".