Author Topic: Chewey Pizza Dough  (Read 9404 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #25 on: September 08, 2009, 04:11:21 PM »
Franky,

Can you tell me what the two sets of numbers you posted relate to? And are the ounce numbers weights or volumes? As you will see from http://cache.dominos.com/homev8/docs/menu/dominos_nutrition_v2.21.00.pdf, a 14" (large) Domino's Hand Tossed Crust Cheese Pizza (I assume baked) weighs 8 x 113 = 904 grams, or 31.89 ounces. If one knows the amount of cheese and sauce used on that pizza, then it should be possible to come up with a reasonable number for the crust alone, and make an adjustment to compensate for losses during baking. We aren't trying to exactly replicate the Domino's pizza, just to get a reasonable number for crust thickness.

There were several questions in my last post that you did not answer. To me, the questions and answers are important because they relate to temperature, which, along with yeast quantity, are perhaps the two most important factors that govern the results you will get with your dough. I don't want to burden you with more math, but you might want to take a look at the following post, and the items linked therein, in which the importance of temperatures is discussed: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8341.msg73486/topicseen.html#msg73486 (Reply 41). At some point, you will perhaps want to calculate the friction factor value for your particular mixer and batch size, and also to measure finished dough temperatures on a regular basis. You can take these measures with respect to your current dough making practices or after using the dough preparation and management methods recommended by Tom Lehmann at Reply 18 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7499.msg64554.html#msg64554.

In terms of hydration, I was thinking of a value of about 56%, which would be pretty close to the situation you mentioned where you added three cups more water. I also think that you will need more yeast. Using more yeast while adjusting water temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80-85 degrees F might get you where you want to be.

Peter

 
« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 04:21:03 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline Franky99205

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2009, 05:01:37 PM »


                                     Medium 12"           Large 14"                Extra large 16"

Dough weight (Ounce)                  15                       21                                 27
Sauce Volume                              3                          5                                 6
Cheese          weight                     5                          7                                 9
This was what I remember we used in Dominos. All weight are in ounces.
I'll take your advise and add a bit more yeast. I'll keep you posted.



Online Pete-zza

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #27 on: September 08, 2009, 05:26:37 PM »
Franky,

Based on the Domino's numbers you gave, you would use around 15 ounces of dough for your 12" pizza and around 27 ounces for your 16" pizza if you want to get close to the Domino's crust thicknesses for those two sizes.

Peter

Offline Franky99205

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2009, 08:43:12 PM »
Pete,

That's right. I use 15 ounce for my medium, 21 ounce for large and 27 ounce for extra large.
My dad used to tell me "If you ask the right question, you will get the right answer".
So here is my question,
What makes the dough chewey?
 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2009, 09:30:44 PM »
Franky,

In Reply 6, you mentioned only two sizes, 12" and 16". I assume that the medium is 14". Is that correct?

As to your basic question, there can be several possible factors for a crust being too chewy. It can be because you are using a high-gluten flour, which has a relatively high protein content that can naturally result in a chewy crust. Some pizza operators use a weaker flour (one with less protein) or blend the high-gluten flour with a weaker flour in order to reduce the chewiness. A chewy crust can also be caused by a dough that is underhydrated for the particular flour used. That is why I suggested increasing the formula water from its current 52.9% to something higher that is closer to the rated absorption value for your particular flour. If a dough is overkneaded, you can also end up with an overly chewy crust. That is one of the reasons why I suggested that you use the dough preparation and management protocol as set forth in Reply 18 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7499.msg64554.html#msg64554. I believe that that protocol should be at the center of what you are doing, and adjust it if necessary based on your particular results. You might also end up with a chewy crust because of insufficient leavening, that is, too little yeast. That is why I suggested using more yeast. Lowering it to slow down the fermentation process is not the ideal approach in my opinion. It is better to get the proper amount of yeast for the window of usability you are after and to control the temperatures to get the finished dough temperature in the optimum range as noted below. If the pizza is baked too long and the crust dries out too much, you can also end up with an overly chewy crust.

If I think long enough, I perhaps can come up with another reason or two for getting an overly chewy crust, but the ones given above are the ones that come to mind at the moment.

Overall, what you should be looking for is balance in the formulation, including temperature control. That means having the right hydration and the right amount of yeast. The rest of the ingredients appear to be in order for the style of pizza you are trying to make, so I don't have any suggestions as to those items. With respect to temperature control, that means controlling water temperature to get the finished dough temperature in the right range (80-85 degrees F) if you are using dough boxes and a cooler (you would use a lower finished dough temperature if you are using trays covered with bags).

I hope that you will keep us posted on your progress.

Peter

« Last Edit: September 09, 2009, 09:47:20 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Franky99205

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #30 on: September 09, 2009, 10:02:48 PM »
Pete,

Your knowledge and sharing it with me and others is just great. I am going to read the thread posts that you have enclosed. I am sure I'll solve the mystry. I know sometimes I over kneat the dough, but I did not keep track of the outcome. I'll do that as well.
I have 3 sizes that I call medium or 12", Large or 14" and 16" or extra large.
By the way how many years have you been in the pizza making business?
You are right I did not communicate too well to begin with and that's why it took so many back and worth. I'll work on that as well.
 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Chewey Pizza Dough
« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2009, 10:10:42 PM »
By the way how many years have you been in the pizza making business?

Franky,

Zero. Pizza is a hobby for me.

Peter


 

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